Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1994, France, English"

See other formats



CJ- 1 AT. ', '*' F r,j I 11 *. 

I.> _ “ Uf 

•*!-!,> . ,, '»f i. J'V 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


! M!-2 ■- "‘•'J .- • 

! 

! 

! ~:r*C£& 

- M .'!> 5*. 
! , ..; ,|,; '*k> 

! i:; - . • ;:S; 


■■ - ! “: 1 '. W "Sr v . 

. • " l; - r i.'* 

1 1 ■ " ■ ialj< 


'i: u - 



tribune 


% 

*SL T, 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


, 0 ?/ 


An Unpleasant Echo 
From a U.S. Name 

Brooklyn Origins of Killer Feed 
An Anti-Americanism in Israel 


*• -U- ^ 

■y.! 


i., ■ • ?cv I 

sr— • ; •-•>1 

tan*-,. 

. . : :. ryl 




• • -■••>■ (Vij 




*VTF.s{\\7iy^ 

< S-V\SIFI0 


joratiiis C 


;v 

ic 

! ■ 

rn, J s;v 

j-i necsIi-.M 

•■fv, 

:-r iodcd 
■L-i. J. ... 


By Clyde Haberman 

\ew York Times Stm» 

JERUSALEM — In some Israeli circles, a 
new dirty word has popped up in the last few 
weeks: Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn produced Benjamin C. Gold- 
stein. who as Baruch Goldstein of the Kiryat 
Arba settlement massacred at least 29 Pales- 
tinians in Hebron on Feb. 25. And Brooklyn 
of course, is part of the United Stales. That 
has been enough to touch a certain anti- 
American streak that lies just below the sur- 
face for many Israelis. 

These are far from the best of times for 
American-born Jews who made oliya, the 
complimentary Hebrew word for immigrat- 
ing to Israel. 

If they wear yannulkes and are on the 
s political right — a group filled with former 
New Yorkers and constituting a clear major- 
ity of the 2,000 to 3,000 Americans now 
immigrating here each year —they sense they 
are now automatically vulnerable to criti- 
cism. And if they live in Judea and Samaria, 
the names of biblical origin widely used here 
for the West Bank, they feel it even more 
strongly, especially from the government. 

“We’re all tagged as ‘settlers,’ and with that 
word alone we’re already put two pegs below 
everybody else," said Btib Lang, originally of 
Nanuet. New York, who lives south of Beth- 
lehem in the settlement of EfraL Roughly 
one-third of the 5,000 residents of Efrat are 
from the United Slates. 

“After the massacre, those of us who are 
Americans dropped down another peg,” Mr. 
Lang said. “Now we’re all seen as Baruch 
Goldsteins." 

Even American-born Jews who are secular 
and lean politically leftward find this an 
uncomfortable period. Not that anyone has 
been physically attacked or subject to blatant 
discrimination. And the United Slates is, at 
heart, an admired ally and Israel's main 
source of political solace, financial support 
and pop-culture guidance, from Big Macs to 
Madonna. 

Still, Stuart Schoffman, a screenwriter and 
magazine columnist who attended the Yeshi- 
va of Flatbush. in- the New York City bor- 
ough of Queens, about a 'decade before Dr. 


*b. v?.' -r . 

Ar*r:-_ s : : 
11* 

*••... 

- 

-F —r •• 
*rr 

-.i 

- ? /■ 



s Jim Hofiaoder/Rnm 

i Dan Tor, left a Jewish settler from Kiryat Arba, sitting with Ms father in the Supreme 
' %L j'. Court at Jerusalem before being called to testify about the Hebron massacre. Page 4. 

The 'Peace of the Brave’ 
j Will Win, Arafat Predicts 


iOi NTFA 


C*'n*=*‘ 






By Youssef Ibrahim 

,V<sw York Times Service 

TUNIS — Hours before a team of Israeli 
negotiators arrived Sunday in Tunis to revive 
peace talks with the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization, Yasser Arafat signaled his conviction 
that an accord might be readied in the next few 
weeks on an Israeli withdrawal from parts of 
the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. 

Mr. Arafat, appearing relaxed during an 
houriong interview Sunday, said that months of 
negotiations could not be swept away, although 
heconceded that his persistence in talking with 
Israel over the past few months had cost him 
dearly in terms of his popularity among Pales- 

■ dt r\ 

“What we have done is not a joke, the flu 
leader said. “This is the peace of the brave and 
the peace of the brave is a difficult tiling, with a 
heavy price to pay. We cannot yield under fire, 
otherwise we cannot continue." 

N pwssto nd Prices 

Andorra 9.00 FF Lu xar0xw rg60 L.Fr 

Antilles 11.20 FF 

Cameroon..l^OOCFA {** • 11j2 off 

EFVPt ftp.™ SStttJM 

France 9.00 FF Senegal 960 CFA 

Gabon. 960CFA £pain .20QPTA5 

Greece 300 Dr. Tunisia ...-1.000 Din 

Ivory Coast .1.120 CFA Turkey -T .L 15,000 

jorcian 1 JD UAE. gfrj 

Lebanon ...U5$ 1-50 U.S. Mil (Eur.) 9U0 


Mr. Arafat balanced that hopeful note by 
insisting on more concessions from Israel on 
the issue of security for Palestinians. He said 
these would include measures to restrain armed 
Jewish settlers in areas heavily populated with 
Palestinians before a formal resumption of 
peace talks begins. 

Among the proposals expected to be dis- 
cussed in Tunis between the Israeli delegation 
and the PLO include joint Palestmian-Isradi 
patrols in Hebron, where a Feb. 25 massacre by 
a Jewish settler led to the death of at least 29 
Palestinians and wounded nearly 200. 

The delegations will be joined mi Monday 
when by an American specialist on the peace 
talks. Dennis Ross. 

While Mr. Arafat would not discuss the de- 
tails of what the talks might deal with, senior 
PLO officials and West European mediators 
said the two parties would consider a Norwe- 
gian proposal that attempts to solve the prob- 
lem of assuring Palestinians they will be insu- 
lated from further violence by Jewish settlers. 

The officials said key points in that proposal 
included establishment ofjoint Isradi-Palestin- 
ian patrols in Hebron, a stepped up schedule 
for the posting of Palestinian police forces in 
Jericho and Gaza, and the presence of represen- 
tatives of the International Red Cross to fill the 
role of independent foreign obsovers. 

The proposal was delivered by Tejje Roed 
Larsen, a deputy foreign minister who has been 

See ARAFAT, Page 4 


Paris, Monday, March 21, 1994 


Goldstein, found liuu "Israelis were too hasty 
to blame this on an American." 

“it reminded me of how marginal we are to 
Israelis," Mr. Schoffman said, talking about 
an altitude that many Americans sense in 
secular native-born Israelis — that anyone 
who gave up life in the United States cannot 
belaying with a full deck of cards. 

“It's a common perception that if you 
come from America you have to be crazy," 
Mr Schoffman said. “Over and over, you 
hear I&aelis ask. ‘Why did you comer" 

Anti-American, and specifically anti- 
Brooklyn, sentiment surfaced immediately 
after the massacre, and although it was aimed 
primarily at Americans on the religious and 
nationalist extremes, it was sufficiently scat- 
tershot to hit other targets as well. 

The newspaper Ma’ariv complained about 
American parents who “send their lunatic 
children to Israel" 

“In Kiryat Arba,” it said in a commentary, 
“the raw material is American, the money is 
American. We have to do the work.” 

Immigration Minister Yair Tsaban singled 
out Brooklyn, wanting about “that gang" 
there, meaning people like Dr. Goldstein who 
are rooted in the Arab-loa thing ideology of 
another Brooklyn product. Rabbi Men Ka- 
hane. 

Urging the government to outlaw Kahane- 
spawned movements, an action taken last 
weekend against the Kach and Kahane Chai 
groups, Mr. Tsaban said, “If we don’t declare 
them ille gal, we will have no legal basis to 
prevent the immigration of then brethren 
from Brooklyn." 

Yitzhak Rabin contemptuously rejected 
that militancy as “a foreign implant," and 
even though aides later insisted that the 
American-oriented prime minister was talk- 
ing about views alien to Judaism, some Amer- 
icans. took it personally and found it a disso- 
nant observation in a nation of immigrants. 

In fact, Americans account for barely 1 
percent of Israel's 5 million people. Olga 
Rachmilevitch, national executive director of 
the Association of Americans and Canadians 
in Israel, estimates that since the creation of 
the state in 1948 not more than 80,000 North 
Sec ISRAEL, Page 4 



JAPANESE IN BEIJING —Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa of Japan and Ins wife, Kay oka, paying their re^ecSstm^ym-Ihe 
Monument to the People's Heroes in Tiananmen Square. Mr. Hosokawa later held talks with the Chinese prime minister, U Peng. 

Ready to Revert to Cold War , China Says 


By Patrick E. Tyler 

Nnv York Times Service 

BEIJING — Foreign Minister Qian Qicben 
said this weekend that the importance of Chi- 
na’s trade with the United States had been 
overstated and that China was prepared to 
return to the Cold War status of zero trade 
relations with Washington if the dispute over 
China's human-rights record cannot be solved. 

Sri?! combative a week after China's brusque 
welcome and censorious treatment of Secretary 
of State Warren M. Christopher in Beijing, Mr. 
Qian said President Bill Clinton had “en- 
meshed himself in a web of his own spinning” 
over the June deadline he has set for China to 
make “overall significant progress" on human 
rights. 

“If a politician always sets such deadlines," 
Mr. Qian said, “then he will only have his own 
hands and feet bound." 


Mr. Qian made his remarks in an interview 
Saturday with Howell Raines, the editorial 
page editor of The New York Times. 

[Mr. Christopher said Sunday he remained 
optimistic that China would meet Washing- 
ton’s demands for improvements in h uman 
rights and avoid loss of U.S. trade privileges. 
Reuters reported. 

[Mr. Christopher said in a broadcast inter- 
view that China’s reliance on the U.S. market 
for some 40 percent of its exports gave Wash- 
ington substantial leverage. But Ire held oat 
prospects that the United States may move to 
separate its human rights and trade policies in 
the future. 

[“I still have high hopes they are going to be 
doing enough so we can find them in compli- 
ance" and renew most-favored-nation trade 
status, be said. But be suggested that the United 
States might soon turn to other ways of influ- 


encing Chinese behavior. "There are many oth- 
er tools we can use down the road if we get past 
this year,” he said.) 

Mir. Qian’s tone, and that of other senior 
Chinese officials interviewed in recent days, 
raised questions of whether Beijing is reconsid- 
ering itspledge to “make an effort" to respond 
to Mr. Clinton's demands on human rights this 
year, as President Jiang Zemin said in January; 

Mr. Qian said China still believed “progress 
can be made" on its differences with Washing- 
ton. provided that discussions take place “on 
the basis of equality" and mutual respect 

But Mr. Qian, other Chinese officials and 
Western diplomats were at pains to describe 
bow the negotiations will proceed in the 10 
weeks before the June 3 deadline. 

Most analysts here remain somewhat baffled 
over China's sudden decision to bristle and 

See RIGHTS, Page 4 


Clinton Policies: Pacific Allies Are Anxious 


By Clay Chandler 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — When President Bill 
Clinton gathered leaders from the fast-growing 
Pacific Rim economies for talks in Settle in 
November, he proclaimed the event to be a 
turning pdnt in U.S. history. 

“Once in a great while, nations arrive at 
moments of choice that define their course and 
their character for years to come," he declared, 
referring to the Declaration of Independence 
and the containment of communism. “Now we 
have arrived again at such a moment." 

But four months later, the Asian-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum — the 18-nation 
body Mr. Clinton has embraced as the vehicle 


Kiosk 

A Strong Aftershock 
Hits Los Angeles Area 

LOS ANGELES (AF) — A strong earth- 
quake rocked downtown Los Angeles on 
Sunday, lasting about 30 seconds. There were 
no immediate reports of damage or injuries. 

The Cab/omia Institute of Technology’s 
seismology laboratory described the quake as 
an aftershock to the Jan. 17 earthquake. The 
magnitude was initially reported to be 53. 

The quake struck about 1:20 P.M. and was 
felt in a range of 15 to 20 miles from down- 
town. It was fd t in Santa Monica, to the west, 
at the Santa Anita race track to tbe east, and 
in Valencia, about 20 miles to the northwest, 
near the epicenter of the Jan. 17 earthquake. 
That quake, of magnitude 6.7, was centered 
in Nonhridge in the San Fernando Valley 
and killed 61 people. 

Books Page 4. 

Bridge Page 4. 


for strengthening ties between tbe United 
Slates and the dynamic economies of East Aria 
— is in trouble. 

Recent U.S. clashes on trade issues with 
Japan and China, the organization's two big- 

NEVS ANALYSIS 

gest powers, have alienated leaders from many 
of tbe other forum nations and rekindled early 
fears that tbe United Stales planned to use the 
forum as something of a pulpit, according to 
officials from several of the Pacific nations. 

Although there is some support from other 
forum nations for U3. efforts to pry open 
Japanese markets, many of these export-driven 


economies fear they, too, are potential targets 
of America’s new get-tough stance on Grade. 
And leaders around tbe Pacific have protested 
Clinton criticisms of China’s human rights poli- 
cies as meddlesome and naive. Those concerns 
overshadowed Saturday’s meeting in Honolulu 
of finance ministers from the forum countries, 
although the formal agenda was international 
finance and macroeconomic policy, not trade 
or human rights. 

Tbe discussion Saturday focused on issues on 
which most of tbe nations had relatively little 
disagreement: economic policies to promote 
growth, creation of more opportunities for fi- 
nancing Aria’s infrastructure and development 

See APEC Page 4 


No. 34341 

U.S. to Seek 
UN Measures 
To Pressure 
North Korea 

Christopher Predicts 
China Would Not Block 
Punitive Trade Action 

By Stephen Barr 
and Lena H. Sun 

U'asAinpm Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State War- 
ren M. Christopher on Sunday predicted that 
China would not block U.S. efforts to prevent a 
nuclear weapons buildup by North Korea de- 
spite tensions between Washington and Beijing 
over American attempts to link trade to human 
rights issues. 

North Korea will very likely be censured 
Monday by the International Atomic Energy 
Agency for refusing access to nuclear sites, Mr. 
Christopher said, leading Washington to seek 
United Nations action to force compliance, 
perhaps even sanctions. 

“We’ll be seeking a resolution," Mr. Christo- 
pher said in a broadcast interview, “f think 
we’ll be preparing for trade sanctions, but ex- 
actly what happens in the UN. well have to 
wait and see." 

Mr. Christopher, noting that the United 
Stales and North Korea were at an impasse 
over the nuclear inspections, said that “unless 
conditions change in the next day or two” 
Washington would hold talks with South Korea 
on resuming military exercises and sending Pa- 
triot anti-nussOe batteries there. 

Mr. Christopher stressed that “patient diplo- 
macy" would be required for the United States 
to prevail in the dispute with North Korea. 

“1 think China has the same interest that we 
have in haring a nonnuclear p eninsula, " he 
said. “1 would say that if we work at it carefully 
and patiently in the Uuited Nations and bring 
the Chinese along, that they trill not block the 
imposition of sanctions. That’s maybe a little 
different from agreeing to them, bnt ihey11 not 
block them." 

Mr. Christopher said that be had no assur- 
ances from Beijing that it would abstain on a 
sanctions vole, but be said: “What we do have 
is their encouragement to pursue patient diplo- 
macy." 

He said that even though Washington and 
Beijing were at odds over linking trade to hu- 
man rights, be believed that China would “sup- 
port us on the Korean questions because it’s in 
their own self-interest." 

In a later Interview, he said, “Frequently we 
have relations with nations where there is a 
tender issue on one subject and we have to have 
their cooperation on another subject, and we 
gel it because it’s in their self-interest and 
0015 ." 

China remains the only significant ally of its 
Communist neighbor, but Chinese leaders have 
consistently resisted playing a role as interme- 
diary on the nuclear issue. 

In Beijing on Sunday, Prime Minister Mori- 
hiro Hosokawa of Japan said he had strongly 
urged China to persuade North Korea Co accent 
full international inspection of its nudear facil- 
ities. 

“I have very strongly expressed my request 
for China to exert some of its influences," Mr. 
Hosokawa said, “so North Korea will not move 
toward a negative direction.” 

But China indicated there was little it could 
do. “China has only a small role to play," said a 
Foreign Ministry spokesman, Wu Jianmin, 
adding that the issue should be settled by tbe 
two Koreas, the international inspecting agency 
and the United Slates. 

Mr. Wu signaled that China preferred dia- 
logue rather than confronting North Korea 
with UN Security Council sanctions. 

“We hope that parties concerned express 

See KOREA. Page 4 



FLYING HIGH — Jarosl 
185-roeter jump Sunday in 


v'-v 




Rohcri Rjjoc'Agrnct Prance- Pit** 

ring to victory with a 
inPiantca-Sjorema. 


The Man Behind Britain 9 s Juiciest News 


By John Damton 

New York Times Service 

LONDON —Three flights above New Bond 
Street, over a beauty parlor, is the office of Max 
Gifford, PR agent in the raw. 

It is decorated with stories that he has mas- 
saged, maneuvered and leaked onto front pages 
of the tabloids. They are mounted behind glass 
and pinned to the wall like trophies: “Fancy 
Seeing You Here," “Di’s Cousin Dates Derek," 
and — one of the most famous headlines of 
British journalism — “Freddie Starr Ate My 
Hamster." 

Mr. Gifford is in the midst of an interview, 
expounding on his skill in "directing traffic," as 
he calls the art of planting and suppressing 


stories, when in walks a motorcycle' messenger 
wrapped in red leather and bearing a package 
from the News of the World with another 
mounted trophy: “Chief of Defence in Sex and 
Security Scandal.” 

It is the latest bombshell to rock the estab- 
lishment, a lurid tale involving Sir Peter Har- 
ding, the 60-ycar-old Royal Air Force marshal, 
chief or Britain’s armed forces and a hero of the 
'Gulf War, and Lady Bienvenida Buck, a Span- 
ish-born parvenue in her 30s who sold the story 
of their three-year affair for more than 
$ 100.000. 

By the time Mr. Clifford got hold of the case, 
tbe affair had already ended. So Lady Buck, 
who met Sir Peter when she was married to a 


former navy minister. Sir Antony Buck, needed 
more than his love letters. She lured him to 
lunch at the Dorchester. Their conversation 
was taped by a reporter at a nearby table, and 
their farewell kiss was picked up by the zoom 
lens of the paper’s photographer. 

Sir Peter, married for 39 years and the father 
of four, resigned within hours of the story’s 
publication a week ago. ' 

Something about the saga has plucked Brit- 
ish heartstrings: a ramrod-straight, honorable 
elderly soldier Tailing for a femme fatale who 
was bom, not as she claimed into the Spanish 
aristocracy, but “in a squalid back-street flat 
over her peasant dad’s knife-grinding shop" in 

See TABLOIDS, Page 2 


UN Aid Convoy 
Breaks Serbian 
Siege of Enclave 

Conpikdty Our Staff Fran Dispatcher 

MAGLAJ, Bosnia - — A United Nations aid 
convoy entered the Muslim enclave erf Maglaj 
on Sunday, the first such aid shipment since last 
fall and an important step on the road to ending 
the Bosnian fighting. 

People shouting “Food! Food!" ran into the 
streets as nine trucks arrived under a heavily 
armed escort, including armored personnel car- 
riers. NATO planes roared overhead, ready to 
strike in case of any moves by hostile Serbian 
forces. 

In the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, residents 
took another step of their own toward normalcy 
when the home team beat UN peacekeepers, 4- 
0. in the city’s first soccer match in two years. 
Such an open-air event involving thousands of 
people would have been unthinkable there only 
a few weeks ago. 

The convoy that reached the shattered and 
hungry community of 20,000 people at Maglq 
was only the second since last June. 

Three other trucks headed for the adjoining 
Muslim town of Tesanj, part of the Maglaj 
pocket under Serb artillery siege since last sum- 
mer and one of the few active combat zones left 
in Bosnia. The region is home to 103,000 peo- 
ple; most of than Muslims. 

“The Serbs had pulled bade from the south- 
ern access road,” a spokesman for the UN High 

Commissioner for Refugees said. “There wwe 
no more checkpoints on it" 

An official said the nine-truck convoy carried 
80 tons of food and medical supplies as weD as 
doctors from the World Health Organization. 
After unloading, it was to evacuate some 20 
seriously wounded and sick people to 7*^ 

Serbian fire into the enclave had slackened in 
the last few days. Armed Serbs for months 

See AID, Page 4 


a& B.g g:s-2' E-s.b'* » v. <* 




A Choreographer Takes Ballet as Far as i We Can Go* 


By Lawrence M alkin 

Iniemukmai Herald Tribune 
HARTFORD, Connecticut — 
When Kirk Peterson was a dancer, 
he once threw an ashtray at Lucia 
Chase, grand dame of the Ameri- 
can Ballet Theater, after she 
passed him over for a plum role. 
Now, as a choreographer, his im- 
petuous days behind him, he is so 
known for careful planning that 
his dancers refer to him as “The 
Mathematician." 

But he is still a man in a hurry. 
Within six months after he took 


An occasional series about v 
the ittJineJC in limiram'! headlines. 


speed, his airy and above- the- 
grotmd movements, and his intel- 
lectual construction, and Martha 
Graham's visceral and earthy re- 
sponse to dance," Mr. Peterson 
says. "I'm trying to see if aB that 
can be married, and then take it 
farther.” 

He took it a fair distance with 
the premiere in January of “A 
Quicker Blood,” in which five 
dancers examined the physical ap- 
proaches and rejections by men 
and women of each other. It was 
danced to urgent Hungarian 
themes with the force of rough 
sex. 



Mr. Peterson choreographed 
the first section of the nine-minute 


up his duties full-time as artistic 
director or the Hanford Ballet last 
July, Mr. Peterson had revamped 
the corps de ballet with dancers 
trained, like himself, in the classi- 
cal tradition. 

He had also redesigned and 
simplified “The Nutcracker," 
which is every American ballet 
company's Christmas moneymak- 
er; attracted innovative guest cho- 
reographers “to see how far we 
can go with ballet techniques"; 
choreographed a new ballet of his 
own, and presented two programs 


work io only two days, following 
his characteristic pattern of block- 
ing out exactly what he wants on 
stage, based on a close analysis of 
the music. He usually arrives for 
the first rehearsal with a single 
sheet of paper containing the key 
musical phrases of the score num- 
bered in sequence. He turns this 
into choreography by a process he 
describes as “putting day on a 
wire, as if you were building up a 
sculpture. 

But for this, his first original 
ballet for his own company, be 
permitted the dancers to impro- 


of relentlessly contemporary v * se 3°®® of toe movements dur- 
dance that brought the local audi- “8 rehearsal and adapted their 


ence to its feet. 


emotional feedback to the chore- 



The ballet was in need of some ography. 
shaking up. Hartford has a long Although this meant be had to 


Kirk Peterson has revamped Hartford Ballet’s dance corps. 


artistic tradition — among other 
things, it boasts the oldest an mu- 
seum in the United States — but 
the city is going through hard 


throw out his original conception 
of the second pan and start again, 
he still imposed his own strong 
physical style. He found the exer- 


times. its landmark insurance in- else difficult but satisfying, and so 
dustry in decline. And as the city did the audience and the local 


dustry in decline. And as the city did the audience 
suffers so does its ballet company, critics, 
hurling from a long drought of “Kirk’s ballets are very hard to 
private patronage. learn, but the dancers fit it into 

As Mr. Peterson explains his their bodies and it feels good," 
ideas, it becomes dear that he’s up said Francia Russell of the Pacific 
to the challenge. “Our American Northwest Ballet in Seattle, where 
choreographers have made an Mr. Peterson choreographed a 
amalgam of Balanchine, with his ballet set to the minimalis t music 


of Philip Glass. “He does strong 
choreography for men. It is rigor- 
ous and intensely musical” 

His range is also wide, and he 
regards it as essential to keep it 
that way for a regional company 
that must be many things to its 
audience. This spring, the compa- 
ny will do two romantic chestnuts, 
Fokine's “Spectre of the Rose" 
and Tudor’s “Lilac Garden," sup- 
plemented by “Hearts," a ballet 
by Mr. Peterson's former col- 
league at the San Francisco Ballet, 


Michael Smuin. The work is based 
on the French film classic “Les 
Enfants du Paradis" and is set to 
songs by Edith Kaf. 

Mr. Peterson’s arrival has also 
strengthened the company's alli- 
ance with the Hartford ballet 
school which had been turning 
out classical students for a compa- 
ny whose former focus was largely 
in modern-dance. 

“Kirk comes from, the classical 
tradition but be is going on with it 
instead of getting stuck," said 


Truman Finney, a Hanford 
teacher who spent years teaching 
at companies in Stuttgart, Ham- 
burg, Copenhagen and London. 
“He hasn’t discarded the past but 
he's not asleep in it.” 

Mr. Peterson comes by his 
eclecticism naturally. His mother 
was a professional tap dancer on 
the nightclub circuit. After Mr. 
Peterson's birth in 1950 sbe set- 
tled in New Orleans, where at age 
4 he began ballet training with 
Lelia Haller, an American who 
had beat a premiere danseuse 
with the Paris Opera in the 1920s. 

Given a scholarship to Mr. Bal- 
anchine's School of American 
Ballet at 16, be chose instead to 
study at the Harkness Ballet 
School because it emphasized 
dancing for men. He has also 
studied modern, Indian and fla- 
menco dancing and choreo- 
graphed for Broadway. 

His performing repertoire in- 
cludes the full-length classics and 
works of Mr. Balanchine, Antony 
Tudor, Frederick Ashton, den 
Tetley, Jerome Robbins and 
Twyla Tharp, for whose American 
favorite; “Push Comes to Shove" 
he was cast as the lead following 
Mikhail Baryshnikov at the Amer- 
ican Ballet Theater — until the 
Russian megasiar pushed him out 
of the company. 

The episode obviously still ran- 
kles when, without naming names, 
he says: “One wonderful thing 
about American dance is that 
there is a kind of freedom and a 
lade of the formalized, old-fash- 
ioned, stodgy approach. One of 
(be worst dancers to work in con- 
temporary choreography are 
those trained in the Soviet scbooL 
They know the basics but they 
have blinders on. 

“1 have a kind of professional 
loathing for Russians in general 
because they get away with their 
arrogance, coming from the Val- 
halla of dance. People buy into it 
so easily, especially in America 


where we have such insecurity 
about the arts." 

Ballet in America lacks the 
court tradition of Europe but still 
depends on patronage. Regional 
companies sprang up 30 years 
ago, seeded by grants from the 
Ford Foundation. By the flush 
1980s, ballet had become big busi- 
ness. 

But by the end of the decade, it 
had also become a victim of its 
own success. The profusion of re- 
gional companies means a crowd- 
ed market, which makes it diffi- 
cult to make money touring. 
Hartford does most of its travel- 
ing inside Connecticut, and loses 
money on it. 

like many regional ballets, 
Hartford has temporarily dis- 
pensed with an orchestra, and the 
company performs to a pianist or 
to music on tape. The dancers 
have gpt used to it and so, appar- 
ently, has the home audience, 
which was up about 20 percent 
during the season — mainly on 
the new “Nutcracker" — but con- 
tinues to climb for its contempo- 
rary programs as wdL 

Mr. Peterson took over a com- 
pany that grasses about S2 million 
a year and is working to draw 
down a debt of 5185,000, and nei- 
ther his nor any other company 
can expect much official help. 
Federal and state subsidies ac- 
count foe only 3 percent of the 
budget. Five percent is the nation- 
al average, but the money matters 
most as an official seal of approv- 
al to encourage private donors. 
Such funds typically make up half 
of a company^ revenues, but only 
a third in Connecticut’s depressed 
economy. 

Competition is fierce. The Na- 
tional Endowment for the Arts 
regards all dance as equal so bal- 
let and break-dandng share limit- 
ed subsidy money. 

“Right now,” Mr. Peterson 
says, “survival is the most impor- 
tant thing." 


Pope Condemns Slaying of a Priest 

ROME (Combined Dispatches) — Pope John Paul II on Sunday 
condemned the murder of a 36-year-old pnest by suspected underworld 
gnnmen as he donned his vestments in the sacristy of his church north of 

I « I irtlfltP VfUl fA II 111 if* Tlflt n mp lit 


■ f.st ' 


for the feast of San Giuseppe, when two gunmmerept mto the Church of 
San Nicola di Bari in the town of Casal di Principe — a haunt of the 
Neapolitan criminal organization known as the Camorra —and shot hir? 
twice in the head. Father Diana has publicly opposed the Camorra. 

Local immediately associated the slaying Saturday with the 

nationa l election on March 27 and 28, in which campaigning has been 
overshadowed by accusations that the Mafia is backi n g the newly formed 
Forza Italia party, led by the media magnate Silvio Berlusconi. On 
Sunday, Mr. Berlusconi called the charges “base and shameful lies" at a 
rally in Palermo, the capital of Sicily- (NYT, AP , Reuters) 


2 Italian Journalists Die in Somalia 


MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP) —Two journalists for an Italian televi- 
sion network were shot and killed on Sunday when bandits apparently 


tried to hijack their vehicle in Mogadishu. They are the sixth ana seventh 
journalists to die in Somalia since the United Nations took over last May 


journalists to die in Somalia since the United Nations took over last May 
from a United States-lcd multinational force that arrived in December 
1992. 

Daria Aipi, 28, a RAI-3 reporter, and Miran Krovatm, 45, a camera- 
man, were gunned down in their pickup truck near the former Italian 
Embassy in the heart of this capital. They were traveling with a Somali 
driver and three aimed guards, none of whom were hurt Major Chris 
Budge, a UN militar y spokesman, said the guards had tried to resist the 
holdup. 

Ms. Aipi spent weeks in Somalia last year covering the Italian role in 
the UN peacekeeping mission. She was sent back two weeks ago to cover 
the withdrawal of the I talian, American and other Western contingents. 


German Police Battle With Kurds 


BERLIN (AP) — More than 80 German policemen were injured in 
battles with Kurds demonstrating for an independent homeland during 
the Kurdish spring festival tire police said Sunday. 

The dashes took place Saturday in Berlin and in Bavaria. At least two 
Kurds were injured in Berlin when their dotbes caught fire as they 
handled firebombs, and in the Bavarian city of Augsburg, two Kinds 
were injured, one seriously. Altogether, 24 Kurds faced riot charges. 

In Bavaria, trouble broke out when policemen stopped buses earning 
about 6,000 Kurds toward a banned demonstration linked to Monday’s 
spring festival known as Newrus, on which Kurds often have hddft 
independence demonstrations. The police said several hundred Kurds 
blocked the Munich-StuUgart autobahn, overturning several vehicles and 
setting fire to improvised barricades. 


CrPrsss; 


Rebel Planes Attack Kabul Palace 


Q & A: Parliament Union Casts a Tolerant Eye on Democracies 


President Francois Mitterrand 
will open the spring meeting 
Monday of the Inter-Parliamen- 
tary Union representing elected 
{man or less) assemblies in 125 
countries ranging from North 
Korea to the United States. 
Pierre ComiUon of France, the 


secretary-general, discussed the mentaiy Union do anything to re- 
work of the 105-year-old body verse this state of affairs? 


with Barry James of the Interna- A. We can try by promoting real 
tional Herald Tribune. democracy, by ensuring that m ev- 

ery country there is a parliament 
Q. Everywhere you look these elected by the freely expressed wiB 
days, democratic institutions are in of the people, and by helping those 


tional institutions and associations ay to unite and foster cooperation 
which can in the future organize among all those who exercise legis- 


and monitor their own elections so lative functions. There is, however, 


that they wi 
Q. Will ye 


will be free and fair. a large consensus on a certain num- 


you be taking any part in ber of criteria for democracy and 


the South Africa elections? 


yes, we promote them. If some of 


trouble, and politicians are deeply parliaments to work seriously. We 
disrespected. Can the Inter-ParUa- also encourage the creation of na- 


A_ That wiD be decided in this our members have not yet achieved 


conference. Since there will be be- those criteria, we encourage them 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 



tween 11,000 and 12,000 interna- to do so. but we do not ten them to 
tional observers, we may question stay out In fact, the international 


whether sending five or six persons community up to now has never 
more wiU make any difference. But defined what are these criteria for 


we see the election as part of a free and fair elections. There may 
process that includes institution- be a lot of common ground, but 


baflding, and we win certainly there is no internationally ap- 
launch a project to help the newly proved text. 


smnably. P arliamentarians are of- 
ten in the first line of fire. 

A. And we are here to defend 
them. We have a committee that 
studies allegations rtf violations of 
the human rights of parliamentari- 
ans. starting with harassment and 
ending with arbitrary imprison- 
ment, or even extra-judiciary exe- 
cution. This committee is very ac- 
tive. It acts as a moderator between 
the victims or the alleged victims 
and the authorities, in the first 
place confidentially bat publicly if 
it doesn't get satisfaction. 


KABUL (AP) — A rebel general’s jet fighters dropped bombs near the 
presidential palace on Sunday, and rocket fire between rival factions left 
at least 100 people wounded elsewhere in the capital. 

The bombing raids by pilots loyal to General Abdul Rashid Dustam 
marked the first air strike on the capital in about six weeks. General 
Dustam has a limited number of planes, and they have not bees 
particularly effective daring his efforts to oust President Burhanoddin 

The president's army has been under attack since Jan. I by the 
combined forces of General Dustam and the renegade prime minister, 
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. The president stQl bolds most of the capital 
despite fighting that has left more than 1,000 people dead and 12,000 
wounded. 


Bomb Wounds 5 in South Thailand 


BANGKOK (Reuters) — A bomb exploded in the southern Thai city 
of Hadyai on Sunday, wounding at least five people, the police said. 

The blast came three days after the discovery of a truck bomb that 
police say they suspect was intended for use in an attack on the Israeli 
Embassy in Bangkok. That attack was foiled. 

The bomb on Sunday was concealed in a box and planted by ao 
unidentified man in front of a bookstore in central Hadyai 1,200 
kflometere (745 miles) south of Bangkok, the police said. It blew up while 
a policeman was inspecting it, wounding him and four other people. 


elected parliament and its members 
to work property. 


Q.-So what are your criteria? 

A. Wdl, our executive committee 


a. wehavTtodto deal ueforut- Liberal Spanish Socialists in Control 

-Ak ... -n. - _ *■ 


Q. You have, however, played a is working on a long list of them, 
fairty important role in other dec- starting with the registration of vot- 


tions, for example those in Cambo- ers, arid including such thi ng * as 


dia and Namibia? 


freedom from intimidation during 


A. Yes, but in both cases we also the campaign, the secrecy of the 
saw the elections as part of a pro- ballot and the way the votes are 


cess. In Cambodia we not only ob- counted. I hope there will be a large 
served the elections, from the regis- consensus to approve these criteria 


tratiou of voters to the counting of at this meeting. 


votes, but we embarked on and are Q. So race elections are over and 


continuing with a large technical you have a parliament in place, 
cooperation project to enable this how does the Inter-Pariiamentaiy 
newly elected assembly to function. Union go about helping? 


Q. You talk of free and fair dem- 


parli aments 


ocratic process, but you couldn’t structure themselves, for example 
describe many of your member by having good documentation and 


countries as democratic? information systems and good staff 

A. The Inter- Parliamentary to help the parliamentarians. We 


Union go about helping? Q. Doesn’t it bother you that in 

A We ay to help parliaments parliaments around the world, even 
structure themselves, for example m the most democratic countries, 
by having good documentation and there is such a small participation 
information systems and good staff of women? 


Union tries to promote values but also promote the idea of pariia- 
it does not have criteria for mem- meats and their members as guard- 


MADRID (Reuters) — Prime Minister Felipe Gonzhlez’s Socialists, 
COTumttee has bem wotteng ance divided over policy issues, named a new 36-member executive committee 

W n^LT 11 " o° Sunday that put the liberal wing firmly in control but still left more- 
died more than 700 cases. Between orthodox members with a substantial voice. 

■.“? a “ Bvt Th* 5 33d national congress of the Socialist Party, in its final day of 
beta solved satisfactory. In many deliberations, was expected to accept the executive list, headed by Mr. 
cases where mcmberaofparnament Gonzilez, who has been secretary-general for 20 years and the standaid- 
haye been put in jail we were the bearer for the liberal camp, 
only organization allowed to go 

Opposition to Get Seats in Tunisia 

we are effective. TUNIS (Reuters) — ’Tu ni s ian s voted in presidential and parliamentary 

• elections on Sunday, and opposition parties were guaranteed seats in 

Q. Doesn’t it bother you that in pariwment far the first time since independence from France in 1956. 
parliaments around the world, even President Zine Abidine ben All running unopposed, is certain to retain 

in the most democratic countries, office and his Constitutional Democratic RaJQy was expected to win all 
there is such a small participation freely contested parlia m entary seats. A change in the electoral law 
of women? means an additional 19 seats wflf be distributed among six opposition 

A Indeed it does. But we have ^sed on their share of the vote, A total of 623 candidates are 

been very active in this fidd al- seekin 8 P 1 *" 3 toe 163-seat National Assembly. 


we are effective. 


bership. Because we have a univer- ians of riv3 rights, 
sal mandate, we gather together all • 

the parliaments m the world. We Q. Starting with 


Q. Starting with their own, pre- 


been very active in this fidd al- 
ready, and at this meeting in Paris 
we hope to approve a plan of action 
to correct gender imbalances in po- 
litical life. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


TABLOIDS; The Man Behind Juiciest British News AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — The dream^rf^high speed rail link 




Continued from Page 1 


You too could win Dh.500,000 
(approx. US$ 138,000) in the world’s 
W^r greatest Duty Free raffle. Only 1 ,200 tickets 
per draw, priced at Dtu500 (US$ 138) each, 
available to bonafide departing, arriving and transiting 
passengers. 

The prize money may be collected in cash, banker's 
draft cheque, or paid directly into your bank account. 
Buy vour t icket the next time you fly through Abu Dhabi. 

For more information telephone 706 5690 


Valencia, as The Sun so delicately 
pul it. 

His printed love letters made 
people ache at the pure humiliation 
of it all. 

“My darling, my little one, my 
love Nothing has ever happened to 
me like this. ( love you to distrac- 
tion. I find you utterly captivating, 
enchanting, intelligent, practical 

determined, overwhelmingly beau- 
tiful and desirable.” 


Mr. Ctifford, representing Lady looking 50-year-old merchant of 
Buck, is pulling levers and pressing sleaze, has gone too far. He has 
buttons like a sweating disc jockey, been called a lot of names in the 


He appears on radio shows to de- last few days, none of them nice. 


fend her, tries to steer a reporter 


minutes from the woman in ques- 
tion. She is, as agreed, holed up ata 
secret location abroad awaiting a 


„ t .l j , t . Mr. Clifford, like liberate, is 

away from the angle that she was crying all the way to the bank. He 
an undercover agent for an Arab gets® pereentofthe action. But be 
ccnmtry and fields calls every 10 „pseu people by cloaking his ac- 
tions in an aura of higher purpose. 
The story of Lady Buck and Sir 


rcwct luuiuon aoroao awaiting a Pe tCT Harding was politically im- 

POrtant became it might have in- 
^whrjshephuuto vofced a risk to natSl security, 
return in a blaze of television inter- 


AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — The dream of a high speed rail link 
unbroken from southern France to the northern Netherlands has come a 
step closer with Dutch cabinet approval for a key 1 10-kilometer part of 
the route. 

Tk 5 -7bjfiion guilder (nearly $3 billion) Dutch line is to be ready by 
the year 2003. Trams running 300 kilometers an hour will slice the tune 
from Fans to Amsterdam from six hours to just over three. 

The Dutch have decided to build a new straight route rather than 
upgrade the existing line. The remaining stages of government review 
eouJd be stormy because of the powerful Dutch environmental move- 
ment. But no major political party has made an issue or the route. 

Die airport in the northern Pfaffippine dtv of Lamp n*onpn«t tnrwmlar 




Sl f1f y 'vS fat yem “ lt was closed to prevent the 
unauthorized return of the body of the deposed dictator Fentinand E 
Marais. Last year. President Fidel V. Ramos allowed the body to be 

Fft u rriotfvi 



| bjJSJI&SJMMJI. . Irto 

jAbu Dhabi 
Airport Duty Free 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 1 

BMraOflS • MASTERS • DOCTORATE 
For wart. Ufa —I Acahalc 
Esparim * Ha Ctarnon 
JxWSJvk ABanSnec RapM 
fkeS&P (310)471-0306 
FAX: (310)471-6456 
Cig or T ft« far i atarHaa 
ar Sana doioABd nnoa for Era EvsfaaltaB 

Pacific Western University 

600 N Scpufaedi BM . 0 ep( 23 
. us Angelas CA 9 TO 49 


views. 

“I don't understand this,” Mr. 
Gifford booms into the receiver, 

I bolstering his client’s resolve — 
and keeping the story going. 
“They’re coming out and saying the 
most terrible thing s about you, and 
you’re just supposed to say noth- 
ing? Is that right?" 

After be hangs up, he smiles: 
“You don't have to fuel 


things. They keep going by them- 
selves.” 


But there are those who say that 
this time, Mr. Ctifford, the boyish- 


he has claimed. repatriated. “ (AFP) 

Anyway, his client was worried . 
that others would bred; the story. 1 1118 Week’s Holidays 

bow ihaithe? storywaito^ damage ^ be . doscd or recces curtailed in 

saar&sSS — — - 

world of quasi -journalism that wirnNircnAV. > ' 

pays big money for scoops and ex- WHWESDAY. tran, pension. 

P05&. Competition among tabloids iblikwjai: Iran, 

is razor sharp these days. Pmiers FRIDAY: Cyprus. Greece. 

sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. 


money." 

The episode is only the latest in a 
world of quasi -journalism that 
pays big money for scoops and ex- 
poses. Competition among tabloids 
is razor sharp these days. Papers 
wfl] pay $200,000 to $300,000 tor a 
story with legs, Mr. Gifford claims. 


■W.r. - 


Or<\ • - 



With MCI CALL USA and MCI WORLD REACH services, 
reaching around the world has never been easier. 


Tb reacn around the world, use your MO Card or call collect. 0 Just select the number next to the country you're calling from An Eneiish- unkM 
operator will put your call through to anywhere in the 50 States as well as a growing list of participating World Reach countries?^ 


Austria 

Belgium 

BolMa 

Brazil 

Ome 

Colombia 

Cyprus 

C*ectiRep 

Denmark 

Dominican Repuoiic 


022-903-013 

Ecuador 

170 

Italy 

172-1032 

078-11-00-12 

Egypt' 

355-5770 

Kenya** 

080011 

0-800-2223 

Finland 

9800-102-80 

Kuwait 

eOO-MCI (800-6241 

000-8012 

France 

19*00-19 

Lebanon 

425-056 

00*0316 

Germany* 

0150-0013 

Mexico* 

95-800-674 7000 

980-16-0001 

Greece 

00-800-121? 

Netherlands 

06-022-91-22 

080-90000 

Hungary 

00* 800 0V.H 

Norway 

050-12912 

00-42-000112 

India** 

000-127 

Peru' 

001-190 

8001-0022 

Ireland 

1-800-551-001 

Poland 

0*01-04-800-222 

1-800-751-6624 

Israel 

177-150-2737 

Ftortugal 

05-017-1234 


Saudi Arabia 

Slovak Rep 

Spam* 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

turkey 

DAE 


1 -800-11 
oo -a 3-0001 r? 
900-99-00K 
020 735-923 
155-0222 
99-8001-H77 

800-in 


f\L, 
_c « i];r- ■ 


Urmed Kingdom 0800-89 0222 


Uruguay 

Venezuela' 


000-412 

800-1IW-0 


*Cnurarv-w-rou>wy tatagrTtyntttK salable roMrcmaiMQ CALL USA toot urn Cerramittintiionsapjsy "Ww lor stand dal tone. *7UartaMe Ihrni ntw mamr «ie^ 

W^ClUlinjDinsxfaofCwo <M0?faV n«!ienaiataieouOi(teolimxite4aeMiijiTt»f* im _ 
tn some countries. puOK ohonei m» nwjisip defiOM al com or phone caid lot cU [one tferwee horn public reMmons ms» De med 
Rare depends on can ongn n Meaco "Sen** *wuole on a lumea rusa n eastern Germany OMO hwmaiKXiat H I99J 

MrittslQfn^atanerMOpitiqucisanflservKiiSniertioriedhpm jeprtipnetarvniafksotMGCotTirnuiicaionsCotporjtm 


Now it’s easier than ever to chew the fat. 


MCI 


Imprimc par Offprint. 73 rue de I’Evangile. 75 (UX Paris. 








) cjr A 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


Page 3 





THE AMERICAS/ THIN KIN 



.'%2t 



NOVEMBER 


*■ *t>® t* - »uC c?apl!; * 

‘WC Cl Cas5 c f *^PI i'n, e| % 
*w Kaotr^-Pna^ '^h£f 

ksiLtl'u ® hj. \ 



POLITICAL NOTES 


?;>. haadj. 

4rr *ed m !*=■ 

xponer. ar.c M **f 

» lis&r picLas -n^ 1 ^ 

s capital. Ths, : “ Cjr ! ^c fcJ* 
trdi. none o: ■*«■, !rale, *m*?k 



£?£.?**«* 

Tours for a :: : ^Ver 
UK pciKc Sic S T.V; ,l 
iurda> m Bcrli- 1-J7- k,. 
ba ’*hen. tj-w- • .•„ 11 
the 9iVjr.Jr' - ’"' l '.- r ; * u *ta fi*r 
■^lonether 

i bacr.exl ier.or^-’.’I 

ft au*oh»nr -•, rrturr.T > 


imcace^ 


' rr -u hunowj 

^ Willi*! 


Lttaek Kabul PaU 

general' 1 ; i-t r — — -.. 
icbewhsrr - - . -•il:“ 


oSs :.'• <_-rr.r:_ 
m the *.\ip:L;' - "■ 
nbrr rf r : - r . 

; fa* 

a brer. r- 
!X.or r 

s p:s-cder.: .-:.. ■■ 

£ Hr.-TJ :h_r. ' *• 


Ri-aci 
•V' :*K- 

^ < 1 S; bj;;;g. 

-■‘ftwdsr.i Brc. 

* . l i" •■ 

v‘^ cs :r ®t 

-• ~ ,, M Mi !is- 
" ■ " •> -j;‘ 


5 in South Thailaiii 


-L-JtStE. 
’ - ! rj;i Vr 

;/ l A 

. - n:J« 

•-.J |:pe»e 


A N‘ir: ?tr _.- 

i! ■ ■ ■. - 

v dfir’ in; : - 
vexer-itz ■ .... 
itLzc'i. ' . . 
is .- 

of a Xvi. : *. 

B^gk-k .• : 

L :vr*z 

it Social Uts in Contr. 

?jjpc Msr; r : -: 

nse^ a ::r.. 

jI . -- v*s- Jf 

S:stl_ ••- .-. 

> k>i i?S 

W J-'-'S?’ V ■ ■•':•- • • 

' ' I -r?- - 

icl Scab in Tunisia 


UJjji l-.llZC - 
TJVA.L*. ^ •' 

wr.ee 


-j-jr' 


• rier.vtj 1 ’. r— 

i j 

ic: ’■* •• * ■ 

i Nap.-- 1 ' — v-r. 


- ■ - — 

'r ' 


SL ITDATE 

High-Speed RnB 


si >'■•• 

;!•* L\.»- - • - 

>1 s. »‘r. .■••'■ - 

t! i‘.K ' 

- ^ ! - 

■; rrr . -■ ■■.- V: 

^ . 
«rti W- ' : .— 

UMfip-- «■» «-*' L ' i1 ' 
frf" - - ~- 

■u"- -■- ry " 


*C “ — 



Gun Lobby Suffers 
Mounting Deficits 

. WASHINGTON — The Na- 
tional Rifle Association, long 
considered one of the richest and 
most powerful lobbying groups 
in the nation, has run znulti- 
million-dollar deficits for the 
past three yean and has been 
forced to use S4Q million in ™<h 
reserves, according to associa- 
tion officials. 

The overspending has had no 
effect on the group's Washington 
lobbying, although it ate up 
nearly half of the organization's 
savings. 

Critics attribute the defid t to 
the difficulty of maintaining the 
huge membership that is the or- 
ganization's source of strength. 
Association membership fell 
from 2.9 million in 1989 to less 
than 15 million in 1991. 

Today, after a membership 
drive that cost more than $6 mil- 
lion, the organization claims 
about 3 3 million members. 
Association executives said 
that although they had operating 
defirits of as much as S37 million 
a year, the group still had about 
550 million in the bank. 

“We are going through a peri- 
od of change,” said Neal Knox, a 
member of the board of direc- 
tors. “When you do that, it costs 
money. The important thing is 
that the NRA is extremely viable 
and is not going to spend itself 
into bankruptcy." (AP) 

Clinton on Press: 
‘Herd of Cattle’ 

WASHINGTON — After 
weeks of negative press, Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton had a chance to 
size up media coverage of his 
administration, and his choice of 
metaphors was not very flatter- 
ing. 

At a children’s town hall tde- 
vised by ABC. one teenager 
asked Mr. Clinton bow he was 
able to focus on important poli- 
cies amid “all the unfavorable 
press that you have been receiv- 
ing.” 

“Well, what I do is answer the 
questions the best I can,” Mr. 
Clinton said. “And I recognize 
that the press is like a herd of 
cattle sometimes — they just get 
swarming on some issue and they 
become obsessed with It" 

Mr. Clinton said the American 
people, meanwhile, were “ob- 
sessed with their own lives.” And 
he noted that the youngsters 
themselves had asked questions 



Rotai Gtmu/Agaicr FrucffTcue 

AUTHOR AND FRIEND — Zlata FiHpovk, 13, whose diary 
of life in Sarajevo is a worldwide best-seller, talking with 
President Bill CEntoa during an intermission in bis televised 
“Children’s Town Hall Meeting” at the White House. 


focused on policy matters like 
crime, health care and jobs. 

The program's moderator, Pe- 
ter Jennings, noted there was not 
one question about the Gimons’ 
Whitewater land deal. (AP) 

Rose Firm Seeks 
Hubbell Inquiry 

WASHINGTON — The Rose 
Law Finn has asked the Arkan- 
sas state bar association to inves- 
tigate posable client overbilling 
and expense irregularities by 
Webster L Hubbell, who re- 
signed his post in the Justice De- 
partment last week because of 
the dispute with his former law 
partners. 

All 28 partners of the Rose 
firm agreed to send a complaint 
to the Arkansas Supreme Court 
Committee on Professional Con- 
duct, according to a source dose 
to the firm. The committee over- 
sees the state's legal profession 
and has the power to discipline 
lawyers for ethical transgres- 
sions. 

Rose lawyers contend that Mr. 
Hubbell owes them and his for- 
mer clients, including the federal 


government, hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars, sources said. 

Tn announcing his resignation 
as associate attorney general last 
week, Mr. Hubbell said he had 
done nothing improper and 
characterized the issue as a pri- 
vate financial dispute among for- 
mer colleagues. 

Rose officials have been inves- 
tigating whether Mr. Hubbell 
wrote checks on an account used 
for client expanses to pay for his 
personal nips, credit card bills 
and other items. The inquiry, 
which sources said began formal- 
ly last year, examined cases and 
records going back to 1988. ( WP) 


Quote/ Unquote 

Vice President Al Gore, ad- 
dressing the audience at the 
Gridiron G ub's annual satirical 
review in Washington, on his 

reputation as a stiff politician: 

“AJ Gore is so boring his Secret 
Service code name is Al Gore.” 

On his rede in the Clinton ad- 
ministration: “When people ask 
me what it's like to be number 
two at the White House. I say, 
*She seems to enjoy it' " (AP) 


Democrats Bracingfor an Election Bruising 


By Richard L. Berke 

Net? York Turns Serwrr 

Washington — Facing up to the 

near-certainty of major losses at even.- level 
in mid-term elections this year. Democrats 
are increasingly looking to the passage of a 
health-care bill this fall as their best hope for 
limiting the damage. 

But even as they set to work to overhaul 
health care. President Bill Ginton’s top poli- 
cy priority. Democratic candidates for the 
House, the Senate and governorships are 
more and more concerned about a spillover 
from the president's political troubles, par- 
ticularly the Whitewater investigation. 

The nervousness among Democrats is not 
simply prompted by their having more 
House and Senate seats to defend than the 
Republicans, and more governorships, or the 
historical pattern that the party in the White 
House pays the price in the next midterm 
election. There are several factors making 
their task tougher this year. 

For one thing, the Democrats are losing a 
particularly high number of incumbents and 
having a hard time recruiting strong candi- 
dates to replace them. At the same time, 
those remaining in office face the same anti- 
incumbent anger that fueled Ross Perot's 
1992 presidential race. 

The danger sign s are most pronounced in 
the Senate, where Democrats are bracing for 
hard-fought races in suites where they now 


luding Ari 

gan. New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Ten- 
nessee and Virginia. 

Although few analysts predict that Repub- 
licans will pick up the seven seats needed to 
give them a Senate majority, most Demo- 
crats expect their working majority in the 
chamber to be eroded. 

That is a significant problem, given the 
closeness of Mr. Clinton s victories on issues 
like the budget last year, which was rescued 
when Vice President Al Gore broke a tie in 
the Senate. 

Complicating all this for the Democrats is 
the growing preoccupation in Washington 
over the investigation of the Clintons and the 
Whitewater affair. While polls show that the 
case has not greatly affected public attitudes 
toward the president or the Democratic Par- 
ty, party officials acknowledge that it has 
knocked them off stride. 

Already, the party chairman, David C. 
Wilhelm, sounds defensive when he warns 
Democratic candidates that it would not be 
in their best interest to distance themselves 
from the White House. 

That tactic was used by House Republi- 
cans who disavowed President George Bush 
after he broke his pledge of no new taxes 
before the 1990 election. (The Republicans 
lost eight seats that year, which was fewer 
than many in the party had predicted.} 

Although a presidents coattails do not 


often extend to local races, those contests are 
a way for voters unhappy with the White 
House to vent their frustrations. 

A poor showing also is bound to be cast by 
Republicans as a referendum on Mr. Clinton 
and could weaken his influence with Con- 
gress. 

Charles Cook, editor of apolitical newslet- 
ter that analyzes elections, said the situation 
looked as dire for the Democrats as when 
they last lost control of (he Senate when 
Ronald Reagan was elected 14 years ago, 

“In 1980, there was always the suspicion 
that Democrats could get hammered, trnt it 
wasn't obvious that it was going to happen,” 
Mr. Cook said. “Deep down nobody any 
idea of the magnitude of the losses that 
would be suffered. There are more dark 
clouds on the horizon this time.” 

November, of course, is a long way away, 
and the Democrats say that they can weather 
Whitewater and other controversies that 
may lie ahead and demonstrate to voters that 
they can pass important legislation, like revi- 
sions of health care and welfare. They have 
also successfully begun to seize Republican 
issues like crime as their own. 

No one can predict the forces that will 
come into play beyond partisan politics. If 
the economy continues to rebound, that 
would probably do more for Democrats than 
any strategy from the White House or Dem- 
ocratic Party. 


“There's no single factor that is as signifi- 
cant in 1994 as the state of the economy." 
said Senator Bob Graham of Florida, chair- 
man of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign 
Committee. 

But in recent weeks, the party has seemed 
to suffer only setbacks: Senator George J. 
Mitchell of Maine, the majority leader, unex- 
pectedly announced that be would retire, 
giving Republicans a good shot at what was 
considered a safe Democrat seat 

In Texas, the acquittal of Senator Kay 
Bailey Hutchison on charges that she mis- 
used her office dashed the hopes of most 
Democrats that they would retake the seat 
that had been held by Treasury Secretary 
Lloyd Bemscn. 

There is also great uncertainly among 
Democrats in the House because of the huge 
turnover in their ranks. More than 40 mem- 
bers. most of them Democrats, have already 
announced their retirements or plans to run 
for other offices. 

Since the Democrats lost 10 House seats in 
1992, even a gain of 17 Republican House 
members would give Republicans their high- 
est level since the 1958 elections. 

That could markedly till the ideological 
balance of power in the House, giving the 
Republican minority far more influence. 
There are now 257 Democrats in the House, 
176 Republicans, one independent and one 
vacancy. 


Revised Whitewater Loss Expected 


By Douglas Jehl 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — A review 
being conducted by President Bib 
Clinton's personal lawyer is likely 
to conclude that the Gimons lost 
less money from their Whitewater 
investment than they have claimed 
and may therefore have underpaid 
their income taxes, associates of 
Mr. Clin ion said. 

The review, by accountants 
working for the lawyer, David E 
Kendall, may be concluded this 
week, the associates said. They said 
the Clintons were considering 
whether to make the findings pub- 
lic after sharing them with Robert 
W. Fiske Jr., the special prosecutor 
in the Whitewater matter. 

Mr. Clinton's associates said 
they did not know by how much the 
Clintons might have overestimated 
their investment loss, which they 
claimed as a tax deduction, or un- 
derestimated their tax liability. But 
they said it appeared that the re- 
view would reach both conclusions. 

Mr. Clinton moved late last week 
to preempt criticism by telling re- 
porters that any mistakes made on 
his family's tax returns “certainly 
were not intentional.” 

He said he was ready to pay back 
taxes if necessary. 


“I don't think we owe any extra 
taxes, but I'm not sure yet,” he said. 
“If we do owe. well make it good." 

Until now, the Clintons have 
cited a review prepared by a Den- 
ver accounting mm in 1992 in 
maintainin g that they had lost 
568,000 from their investment in an 
Arkansas land venture known as 
Whitewater Development Co. 

But Mr. Clinton and his wife, 
Hillary Rodham Clinton, have cho- 
sen not to repeat that claim in re- 
cent days, and Mrs. Clinton has 
said that the couple might have 
underestimated their tax liability. 

A tax return prepared for 
Whitewater last year at the direc- 
tion of Vincent W. Foster Jr., the 
deputy White House counsel and 
forma: law partner of Mrs. Clinton 
who killed himself in July, also sug- 
gests that the enterprise had been 
closer to breaking even than the 
1992 report asserted. 

That review was commissioned 
by James Lyons, a Denver lawyer 
who was a campaign adviser to Mr. 
Clinton. 

Mr. Fiske, who is looking into a 
broad range of issues connected to 
the Clintons* investment in 
Whitewater, is similarly expected 
to review the tax records. 


■ ^Perfectly Legal’ Profit 

Mr. Clinton said that his wife 
had engaged in “perfectly legal" 
business practices when she earned 
5100,000 on an investment in the 
commodities market in 1978, news 
agencies reported. 

Mr. Clinton said his wife had 
benefited from the advice of “one 
of our best friends” in an entirely 
ethical manner. The friend was 
James B. Blair, who then was the 
primary outside lawyer for Tyson 
Foods Iihl. of Springdale, Arkan- 
sas, the nation's biggest poultry 
company and a major supporter of 
Mr. Clinton's gubernatorial cam- 
paigns. 

Asked about a New York Tunes 
article, published in the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune on Saturday, 
detailing the transaction, Mr. Clin- 
ton said that his wife had “made a 

r fectly independent and perfect- 
legal investment, made money 
and paid taxes on it.” 

“That’s all there is," he contin- 
ued. “There is nothing else.” 

In Little Rock, Arkansas, a 
spokesman for Tyson said the com- 
pany had done “absolutely nothing 
that's illegal, improper or unethi- 
cal" and had not benefited from 
the friendship of its lop executives 
with Mr. Clinton. (NYT, Reuters) 


Away From Politics 


• A man smd to be the mastermind of an international drug-smug- 
gling network has been arrested in Oregon by deputies or the U.S. 
Marshals Service. The service said the suspect, Peter Christopher 
Scou Macfarlane, 47, a native of Glasgow, was arrested on Saturday 
at a remote residence in Applegate, Oregon. 

• Two World War II-era airplanes touched wings in midair and 
crashed near downtown San Antonio, Texas, killing all four people 
aboard. The two planes were flying in formation with a third vintage 
plane, which landed safely. No one on Lhe ground was injured. 

• A Los Angeles woman accused of severing her deeping husband's 
testicles with scissors has been acquitted of uie main charges against 
her. The juiy felt that the woman, Aurelia Macias. 35, had been 
systematically abused by her husband. Jaime; and was likely in fear 
of her life when the castration occurred, the forewoman said. Mrs. 
Macias was found not guilty of mayhem and assault with a deadly 
weapon — charges that could have brought an 1 1-year prison term. 
The jury was unable to reach a verdict on a lesser charge of battery, 
and prosecutors said they would seek another trial on that count. 

• Pennsylvania's 1989 Abortion Control Act has gone into effect after 
five yean of legal challenges and a confused two-day enforcement 
effort last month. The statute requires a 24-hour waiting period, 
counseling by a doctor on alternatives to abortion, and. for girls 
under 18, parental consent. 

• The first legal battie^onnd to address the health consequences of 
cigarette smoke on nonsmokers has been created by a unanimous 
decision of a state appellate court in Florida. A three-judge panel in 
Miami has ruled that a suit brought in 1991 by 30 former flight 
attendants of various airlines against eight major cigarette makers 
could proceed as a class action. 

• Massachigetts has tamed over 15 schools to private management, 
including the first schools to be run by the for-profit Edison Project. 
This is the widest experiment yet in the United Slates in letting 
private groups run alternative public schools. 

^ Reuter, AP. LAT. NYT 






COMMODITIES IfflIR, SPRING ‘94 
Session) 


Th3 Fairw 
f Dreign efconomic 
t ureaus) 
dir sctly un 
Well as bj) 


Session 


Sponsor 




der the Sta 


Foreign 
Organizer 


e economiq 
central mihistries and 
will resunfie the comprehensive fair 
de enterprises from all 


reign trade 
izer: China 


pril 15 - April 30 

be composed of 45 trading delegations orga 

J lations and 

rovinces, autonomous regions, mu 


lized b^ 
rade commissions (dej: artmen 

ipicipaliti^ 
ic zones 
The 6 
5 days. 


plan, 5 special econorrf 
national corporations. 


Business peopfa from all ovkrthe world 


Foreign Trade Centre (Group) 


Tel: B 


Cable: CECFA GUANGZHOU Fax: 


Trave 
agencies 


678000 (switchboard 


nego iate import and export trade, 
lace: 117 jLhihua Road, Guangzhjou, China 


r and last 
over thel 


kre welcome to 


Telex: 44465 FAIR 


(020) 6665851 


the 

fs, 

s 

as 

9 


country 


CN 


ravel 


ling services have bee t entrusted to China's 
in Hongkong, the Unit 3d States, Thailand, Singapore 
Germany and other countries and regions 





♦ * 



Australia 

Canada 

Netherlands 

Germany 

|apan 

United Kingdom 
United States 




neb. and powerful countries above will attempt to 
retain the ‘right’ to dump their toxic wastes on the peoples of the Third World and Eastern 
Europe. Even though another 120 nations are overwhexningly against this, the 7 may still ‘win’. 
They will do this by trying to prevent a vote. It's a tactic that we think stinks. Only a vote will 
finally ban this offense against humanity and the environment. PfeOSG DSC JOIIT fide. 



I 


j 


i&ci 


a: s- s' tra.*** h x « 







4 . 


r 





Paris and Bonn Try Protest Vote 
To Defuse Dispute k Strong 


Compiled bp Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand said Sunday that he 
had spoken with Chancellor Hel- 
mut KobJ in an attempt to defuse a 
diplomatic dispute that arose last 
week between France and Germa- 
ny. 

A “dialogue" was under way be- 
tween advisers to the two leaders, 
the French president said in a state- 
ment. aimed at mending fences be- 
tween the two normally close allies. 

In a move highly unusual be- 
tween friendly nations, Klaus Kin- 
keJ. the German foreign minister, 
summoned the French ambassa- 
dor. Francois Scheer. last Thursday 
to explain remarts he apparently 
made about the German attitude 
toward the European Union. 

Mr. Scheer had spoken earlier to 
German journalists on condition of 
anonymity. 

Relations between the two coun- 
tries also became strained after Mr. 
Kohl was omitted from celebra- 
tions for the 50th anniversary of 
the Allied landing in Normandy, 
which will lake place on June 6. 

Mr. Mitterrand moved to play 
down the dispute, saying he had 
discussed ‘Ihese issues by tele- 
phone with the chancellor last 
week." 

He added: “Our advisers have 


Mr. Mitterrand said Mr. Kohl 
had not asked him for an invitation 
to the D-Day memorial ceremo- 
nies. He said that he and Prime 
Minister Edouard Balladur were 
considering what would be the best 
way to celebrate the 50th anniver- 


In German 
Elections 


Ream 

BONN — The Social Democrats 
retained tbeir overall majority 
week to hold ajoint farewell parade ahead of Chancellor Helmut 
for the Western allies that defended Kohl s Christian Democrats m lo- 
west Berlin during the Cold War cal elections in Schleswig-Holstein 


" 2 S 


ermany abandoned plans Iasi 


a smaller 
e departing 


met. The dialogue is continuing^ 


He said he would meet Mr. 
kel on Thursday “as has been 
scheduled for a long time." 


and wfl] instead 
military pageant for 
troops. 

“Stating, as I have read here and 
there, that the German government 
had out of resentment canceled the 
Berlin ceremonies is not only un- 
true but it is also an insult to the 
dignity of a great country like Ger- 
many, Mr. Mitterrand said. 

Military sources said the idea of 
a big senaoff was abandoned after 
Russian troops stationed in East 
Berlin said they wanted to join in, 
an idea opposed by the Western 
allies and West Berliners. 

Recalling that cooperation be- 
tween the two countries had led to 
the creation of a French-German 
military corps, “a European 
corps," Mr. Mitterrand said: “We 
remain in this spirit." 

Mr. Mitterrand said that he and 
Mr. Kohl had done “lots of work 
together in the best spirit and we 
shall continue to do so in the inter- 
est of both our countries and Euro- 
pe." (AFP, AP) 


state on Sunday, according to com- 
puter forecasts. 

But the big winners of the vote, 
the second of 19 in a marathon year 
of German elections, were the 
Greens and protest parties as vot- 
ers showed their dissatisfaction 
with mainstream politicians. 

Projections provided by N-TV 
news indicated that the Social 
Democrats had won 38.7 percent of 
the vote, down more than 4 per- 
centage points from their showing 
in the 1990 local election in the 
northern state. 

The Christian Democrats won 




Massacre 
A Lone Act, 
Testimony 
Indicates 




i-lf “ 




j I’ySl'-fitfif*- 


f '*»•>(* 


Sogri S iyn it i /Ayacc France-Pieac 


37.6 percent, a drop of nearb^4 


WELCOME TO UKRAINE — A soldier stabflizmg a carpet at the Kiev airport Sunday before the arrival of Defense Secretary 
W THfam -l Perry. Mr. Perry is on a trip to try to spur deraffitarization in four nudear-armed republics of the forma- Soviet Urnon. 


percentage points over 1990, 
the liberal Free Democrats, Mr. 


Kohl's coalition partners in Bonn, RIGHTS: China Plays Down Importance of Trade Relations With U.S. 


The Socialists Rebound 
In French Local Voting 


Reuters 

PARIS — Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur's center-right 
coalition took a comfortable lead 
in French local elections on Sunday 
but the opposition Socialists, swept 
from power in a landslide defeat a 
year asp, made a modest come- 
back. 

In its first electoral test after a 
year of recession, rising unc 
ment and social unrest, Mr. 
dur’s coalition won about 45 per- 
cent of the vote; slightly improving 
on its score in the March 1993 gen- 
eral election. 


The Socialist Party and its allies 
won more than 29 percent, up from 
20 percent last year, mainly be- 
cause of a sharp swing by young 
voters away from the faction-rid- 
den ecologists. 

The Communist Party took 
about 1 1 percent, tbe extreme-right 
National Front 10 percent and 
ecologists less than 4 percent, ac- 
cording to television computer pro- 
jections. 

Mr. Balladur called the result 
very encouraging and said it 
showed that despite a difficult situ- 
ation, “Ihe French people believe 
die government is doing everything 
in its power to get the country back 
on its feet" 

“Some people wanted these elec- 
tions to be a test for the govern- 
ment" he said on French radio. 


“Well, tbe test has been made. It is 
not negative, it seems to me it is not 
negative." 

Bat the Socialist leader, Michel 
Rocard, bailed “a very clear reviv- 
al" of the left and said voters had 
begun to express their discontent 
with. Mr. Bahadur's policies. 

“The good times are over for tbe 
right the bad times are over for the 
left" Mr. Rocard said. 

Political analysts said tbe result 
was heartening for the Socialists 
without being worrying for the co- 
alition of tbe conservative GaoQfat 
Rally for the Republic and the ceo- 
ter-right Union for French Democ- 
racy. 

About 60 percent of the 18.5 mil- 


lion eligible voters tamed out to 
t2J)28 


elect 2,028 local councilors in met- 
ropolitan Fiance’s 95 departments, 
in charge of public services mainly 
in rural areas. 

Ihe two-ballot vote, with a run- 
off next Sunday, was tbe first elec- 
toral test for Mr. Balladur after a 
year in power, nearly half way to 
the presidential election next year. 
France win also hold European 
Parliament elections on June 12. 

Cantonal elections are usually 
dominated by local issues, but the 
Socialists had hoped to cash in on 
trade muon and student mobiliza- 
tion against a new law that allows 
employers to pay young people less 
than the minimum wage on “train- 
ing contracts.” 


won 4.8 percent, down 1.3 percent- 
age points. The Greens took 10.6 
percent, up 4.6 percentage points. 

Norben GanseL a Social Demo- 
crat from Schleswig-Holstein, said 
there was no question that the So- 
cial Democrats “had lost lots of 
votes while the Greens have made 
major gains." 

“The big winners are the Greens 
and the protest parties,'' he said 

A record 1,266 protest parties — 
about 70 more than in 1990 — 
vying for mayors' offices and seats 
on town and community councils 
chalked up 3.6 percent, a gain of 17 
percentage points. A Danish mi- 
nority party received 2.7 percent 

Section officials reported a 
turnout of about 70 percent 

Although the election was domi- 
nated by local issues, party strate- 
gists in Bonn will be analyzing tbe 
results and possible impact on the 
overall political dimate in an elec- 
tion year culminating in the general 
elections on OcL 16. 

Mr. Kohl, threatened by a strong 
Social Democratic challenge in the 
general elections, is seeking to re- 
verse a slump in popularity. 

In last week’s state election in 
Lower Saxony, the Social Demo- 
crats resoundly defeated the Chris- 
tian Democrats. 

Tbe latest vote was also a test of 
the Social Democrats' standing in 
the state after the embanassing res- 
ignation of Bjdrn Engholm as the 
Social Democratic Party head and 
Schleswig-Holstein premier last 
year. He quit over a scandal that 
has bung over the state since 1987 
when the premier at the time, Uwe 
Barschd of the Christian Demo- 
crats, ran a “dirty tricks" stale elec- 
tion campaign a gains t him 

Mr. Bazschei was found dead, 
assumed to have committed sui- 
cide. shortly afterward Mr. Engh- 
olm won a repeat of the election on 
a wave of sympathy. 

Mr. Engholm was brought down 
by the belated admission that he 
concealed advance knowledge of 
his opponent’s smear campaign. 


Continued from Page I 
confront Washington over its ad- 
monitions tha t time is r unnin g out 
before Mr. Christopher must rec- 
ommend whether to withdraw Chi- 
na’s most-favored- nation trade sta- 
tus by June 3. 

In the wake of Mr. Christopher’s 
visit, analysts here see these two 
possibilities as the most likely ex- 
planation for Chinese behavior 

• China's leadership is seeking 
to demonstrate its strength inter- 
nally by showing a determination 
to stand up to me United States. 
From such a position of strength, 
any concessions on h uman rights 
wQl be easier to sell to hard-liners 
at home. 


• China's hard-liners have al- 
ready persuaded Mr. Jiang that be 
does not have to make any conces- 
sions to Washington, because a 
combination of political and eco- 
nomic pressures at home will force 


Mr. Clinton to renew China's pref- 
erential trade status in June even 
without evidence of significant pro- 
gress on rights. 

Another factor in China’s deci- 
sion to pull up and re-evaluate its 
dialogue with the Clinton adminis- 
tration is the unfolding Whitewater 
investigation in Washington, some 
analysts bare suggested 

A senior Chinese Foreign Minis- 
try official spent much of his time 
during a luncheon with a visiting 
New York Times editor last week 
seeking to understand what poten- 
tial the Whitewater matter holds 
for weakening Mr. Clinton’s presi- 
dency and his ability to conduct 
foreign policy. 

In the interview on Saturday. 
Mr. Qian appeared to be softening 
his earlier criticism of Mr. Christo- 
pher’s mission. He said the meet- 
ings during the secretary’s four-day 
visit had “yielded some results" 


and were not a waste of time be- 
cause they afforded Mr. Christo- 
pher a chance to reacquaint himself 
with C hina after an. absence of 10 
years. 

Mr. Qian and other senior Chi- 
nese officials have began to play 
down the consequences of losing 
preferential trade privileges in the 
American market. 

A senior economist and research 
director for China’s State Council, 
the cabinet-level body under Prime 
Minister Li Peng, said in an inter- 
view last week that a loss of China’s 
preferential trade status in the 
United States would seriously af- 
fect only 10 percent of China's ex- 
ports. 

The research director, Snn 
Shang qm g, said that all of the af- 
fected exports could be redirected 
to Asian markets. 

Addressing tbe same point, Mr. 
Qian said: “The United States of- 


ten says that in its trade with Chi- 
na. China r uns a 520 hiTlirtn sur- 
plus. However, such a conclusion is 
not all that correct." 

Much of that trade originates 
with Hong Kong, Taiwanese and 
other foreign-funded enterprises, 
including American joint ventures, 
set up in China to expert to the 
American market, he said. Thus, 
econo m ic damage from a cancella- 
tion of China’ s trade privileges 
would have a significant impact on 
Hong Kong, Taiwan and on the 
American investor community in 

China. 

“That is why when Secretary 
Christopher met with representa- 
tives of the big companies of the 
United Stales" during his visit to 
Beijing, “all of them voiced their 
strong opposition to the revolting" 
of China’s trade status “because 
that would undermine their eco- 
nomic interests,” the foreign minis- 
ter said. 


APEC: t/.S. Policies Leave Pacific Rim Allies Nervous KOREA: 

UN Action Sought 


Continued from Page 1 
of financial markets around the Pa- 
cific. 

In a speech Friday in Los Ange- 
les, Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bent- 
sen, chairman of the Hawaii meet- 
ing, offered words of reassurance. 
“I don’t plan to go in and twist 
arms and biiQy people around," he 
promised. “There will be none of 
that " 

Bat suspicions still run deep. If 
U.S. relations with Japan and Chi- 
na worsen in the next several 
months, as many analysts expect, 
leaders from the forum countries 
may have little to talk about when 
they gather for their second summit 
meeting this fall in Indonesia. 

Japanese officials have been cyn- 
ical about the forum from the be- 
ginning, although they have been 
too polite to say so publicly. At the 
Seattle meeting Japanese diplo- 


mats struggled to keep a straight 
face as they described their vision 
for the forum's proper role. 
“Creeping incremental gradualism 
by consensus,” they called it. jab- 
bug at Mr. Clinton's more grandi- 
ose vision. 


China’s leaders have viewed the 
forum with ambivalence, according 
to U.S. analysts. They have relished 
the opportunity for broader con- 
tact with potential trade partners, 
but chafed at attempts to use tbe 
body as a vehicle for talking about 
their policies on trade or human 
rights. 


Many analysts predict that Chi- 
na will quit the forum if Mr. Clin- 
ton revokes its most-favored- na- 
tion trading privileges in June to 


protest C hina ’s policies on human 
rights. Such a move would “poison 
the relationship” between China 
and tbe United States and deal a 
crippling blow to the forum, said 
Hoang Yao-sheng, a specialist on 
Chinese politics at the Umversty 
of Michigan. 

The Chntoo administration’s in- 
sistence that Japan agree to quanti- 
tative measures of its progress in 
opening its markets to foreign 
goods — an approach officials m 
Tokyo decry as managed trade — 
has lessened Japan’s already scant 
enthusiasm for the forum. China’s 
fierce resistance to U.S. meddling 
on human rights strikes a sympa- 
thetic chord among most forum na- 
tions. many of whom have been 
subjected to similar U5. criticisms. 


BOOKS 


AID: UN Convoy Reaches Maglaj 

been largely holding since Feb. 10. wfcdi wasn't hdped any by 

The Serbs agreed to the cease- Christopher's visit." He was 
fire after the North Atlantic Tj 


Continued from Page 1 
patience and adopt a constructive 
attitude in the talks and treat other 
parties as equals," he said. 

The administration’s decision to 
increase tbe pressure on North Ko- 
rea was endorsed Sunday by two 
leading members of Congress. 

Richard A. Gephardt, Democrat 
of Missouri and tbe House major- 
ity leader, and tbe Senate Republi- 
can leader,' Bob Dole of Kansas, 
suggested that the administration 
might want to add to the 37,000 
UJ5. troops in South Korea. 

“I think we ought to have air- 
craft carriers in the region," Mr. 
Gephardt said. “We aright ulti- 
mately send more troops to beef up 
the South Korean side.” 

Mr. Dole said that the North 
Korean issue had been “complicat- 
ed because of our problems with 


jVtw York Tunes Service 

JERUSALEM — A settler whtil 
drove Dr. Baruch Goldstein to the 
Hebron mosque where he massa- 
cred Muslim worshippers last 
month dampened speculation Sun- 
day that tbe killer bad an accom- 
plice. He testified that the doctor 
had carried the same type of rifle 
that the army has said was used in 
the assault. 

The settler, Motti Unger, told an 
Israeli commission investigating 
the Feb. 25 slaughter that in his last 
conversation with Dr. Goldstein, 
the doctor had given no hint of 
what he was about to do. 

Tbe possibility of an accomplice 
was raised in testimony last wed: 
by three Israeli soldiers who had 
been guarding the Tomb of the 
Patriarchs shrine, which contains 
the mosque. The soldiers said they 
had seen Dr. Goldstein carrying an 
“American-made M-16 rifle, not an 
Israeli-made Galil, the weapon that 
the army says was used by the kill- 
er. Another settler, who arrived al- 
ter Dr. Goldstein, had carried a 
Galil, two of the soldiers said. 

But Mr. Unger, a security guard 
at the settlement of Kixyat Arba, 
said he was sure that Dr. Goldstein 
had carried a Galil a claim also 
made last week by an army officer 
who was also on duty at the tomb. 

On the morning of the massacre, 
Mr. Unger said, he was called on 
his jeep radio to pick up Dr. Goid-£ 
ston at a local clinic. 

“He looked like he was dressed 
for army reserve duty, and when I 
went in he was getting organized,” 
Mr. Unger testified. “He asked if 1 
could take him down to the cave. 
He had a small gray bag and a 
mini -Galil. There were two at- 
tached dips in the gun, and be had 
two or three other clips.” 

After driving home and parking 
his car. Dr. Goldstein dimbed into 
the jeep for the short ride to the 
cave, bur. Unger said. 

“He didn't say anything, he 
talked little — usually he was not a 
big talker." he recalled. “He left his 
car keys and asked that I leave 
them in iris mailbox." 

When asked whether the doctor 
mentioned a revenge attack on Ar- 
abs, Mr. Unger said no. 

Dan Tor, a settler who had been 
praying that morning at the tomb, 
said that he had run into Dr. Gold- 
stein briefly during the services. 
Tbe doctor had been wearing an 
army uniform, a pistol and “it 
seems to me that he had a nrim- 
Galfl," Mr. Tor testified 

He said the doctor had appeared 




V. 


“agjtated” and had asked him why 


WATER AND POWER: 
The Polities of a Scarce Re- 
source In the Jordan River 
Basin 

By Miriam R- Lam. 291 pages. 
$49.95. Cambridge University 
Press. 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


Reviewed by 
John K. Cooley 


O WHERE is the need to hus- 


band the Earth’s remaining 
water resources, to ease thirst and 
grow food for its exploding popula- 
tion, more urgent than in the Mid- 
dle East. If a specialist or a general 
reader had time to read only one 
book to understand why the re- 
gion’s future, in peace or war, de- 
pends so heavily on water, Miriam 
LowTs “Water and Power” would 
be the book. Professor Lowi, cm 
the Princeton University faculty, 
tells bow during her graduate stud- 
ies, her teacher, Charles Issawi, the 
eminent economic historian of the 
Mideast, chuckled when she told 
him that she wanted to explore the 
place of water in the seemingly nev- 
er-ending Arab-Israeli confronta- 
tion. “Thai" be told her, “should 
keep you busy for a while.” 

It has, and this book is the proof. 
Lowi, before exploring the sub- 
stances of the long and continuing 
Arab-Israeli contention over the 
Jordan River basin, the book’s 
main focus, briefly analyzes other 
cases of riparian dispute: tbe Eu- 


• Ute Lemper, German-born 
singer who Eves in London, Paris 
and Berlin, is reading "Mein Leb- 
en" by Alma Mahler-WerfeL 
“This is an incredible story and 
Fm thoroughly enjoying reading 
about the numerous husbands tbe 
author managed to collect, from 
Gropius to Gustav Mahler. I also 
admire the witty style in which this 
is written.” 

(Michael KaJJenbach, IffT) 



American water experts and diplo- 
mats have bed closely involved in 


map^ingout regional water plans 


' Mideasl These came to cen- 
ter on the imaginativ e and patient 
work of Eric Johnston, who under 
orders from President Dwight Ei- 
senhower in 1955 authored the wa- 
t ex plan that still goes by his name. 

Though Israel Jordan, Syria 
and Lebanon never all agreed at 
the same time on the Johnston an- 
nual water quotas — Jordan began 
complaining at the 1990 Madrid 
peace conference and is still com- 
plaining that the 100 milli on cubic 
metera it was to receive have 
shrunk to zero — Israel and each 
neighbor for a time used the John- 
ston numbers as rough guidelines 
to pursue their own water goals. In 
1964, pan-Arab plans to divert the 
Barriyas and Hasbani rivers, so that 


Israel would receive no water from 
either, brought Israeli military 
strikes against its neighbors. Had it 
not been for the fact that the Arab 
League was unprepared to fight 
over the issue and that President 
Nasser of Egypt was enough of a 
realist to point this out, the 1967 
war might nave erupted three years 
earlier. 

Unfortunately for aO concerned, 
Jordan's need to dam the Yannuk 
River on its frontier with Syria, and 
build water-storage facilities that 
would benefit Israel and Syria as 
well, has never been realized, de- 
spite serious 
oil backing from the United States 
and international finandal institu- 
tions, including the World Bank. 
The elaborately planned but never 
constructed Maqarin Dam and 
predecessors have foundered, basi- 


cally, on Jordan’s unwillingness to 
support Israeli settlement on the 
west Bank and Syria’s fear of the 
plans of Turkey, its upstream 
neighbor on tbe Euphrates, to cur- 
tail its Clow into Syria and onward 
into Iraq. 

All the region's states, except 
Turkey, which is stiD playing with 
the idea of rating its healthy water 
surplus southward and selling it, 
suffer from growing water short- 
ages. Pollution is also increasing. 
Jordan, Syria and Lebanon all 
have periodic water and power cuts 
and rationing. Israel's planners are 
mindful of the desertification of the 
densely populated, Israeli-occu- 
pied Gaza Strip and the growing 
salinity of its own and West Bank 
water sources. They weigh the ne- 
cessity of diverting more and more 
water away from agriculture, one of 
the country's pillars, to drinking 
water and home and industrial use, 
and wonder where the incremental 
Wats' is going to come from. 

There are many lessons, hydro- 
logical political and h uman, m this 
valuable boot Perhaps the most 
important for Western planners is 
that is useless to seek utopian or 
even logical solutions to water 


Continued from Page 1 

blocked UN efforts to send land 
aid to civilians in the government- 
defended Maglaj pocket who had 
been surviving on supplies dropped 
by U.S. planes. 

The mountain settlement has 
been under sustained Serb artillery 
and rocket attack since cease-fires 
were declared in central Bosnia and 
Sarajevo last month. 

The isolation of Maglaj residents 
from the outside world was finally 
broken four days after UN military 
officers vowed a “more muscular 
approach to breach the Serb siege 
cordon. 

Serbian forces appeared to have 
yielded to a combination of tough- 
er UN resolve, demonstrated by 
the airborne arrival of British sol- 
diers last week, and pressure by the 
Russian peace envoy. Vitali I. 
Churkin. 

In Sarajevo, the UN peacekeep- 
ing commander. Sir Michael Rose, 
who was at the soccer game, said it 
was evidence that normalization 
was “an irreversible process” in Sa- 
rajevo after two years of war. 

In a letter sent to UN officials, 
the Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan 
Karadzic, promised that besieging 
Serbs would honor the cease-fire 
around the Bosnian capital that has 


the door separating the Jewish 
prayer area from the mosque was 
closed even though it was me Jew- 
ish holiday of Purim. The door was 
bolted shut because of the Muslim 
holy month of Ramadan, although 
usually it was opened on Jewish 
holidays. _ -• 

Die five-man inquiry commte 
son has repeatedly questioned wit- 
nesses about Ihe possibility that 
Dr. Goldstein entered the mosque 
through that door. 


treaty 

Organization, reacting to a Feb. 5 
attack on a marketplace, gave them 
10 days to withdraw their heavy 
guns from Sarajevo or ride air 
strikes. Die Serbs subsequently 
pulled back some heavy guns and 
put others under UN control 

In another development during 
tbe weekend, the Umted Nations 
disclosed a detailed account of 
events on March 12 that allowed 
Serbian gunners to escape NATO 
fighter planes. 

The report admitted that three t» ,i • i 

hours elapsed from tbe first call for JflpRfl HGfJilTljKjS 
air support from French peace- 


referring to ihe secretary of state’s A • 

trip to Beijing last weekend to press * A M A m 

China on human rights questions. T\J n « . tit \ 

President Bfll Clinton will prob- 1 VCU? Ditty Word 
ably decide in June whether B«jing ^ 




has made enough progress on hu- 
man rights — such as ending the 
use of prison labor and resolving 
questions about political prisoners 
— to renew the low tariffs and 
other benefits that accrue to coun- 
tries accorded most-favored-nation 
trade status. 


Continued from Page 1 

Americans have immigrated to ls- 
rael and stayed. 

But the Americans often have a 
disproportionate influence on the 
national political and social a genda 
— from the left as well as the right 
— because the/ bring an activism 
that many other Israelis lade. 

On the right, American accents 
are unmistakable not only at the. 
Kahane-inspired fringes but also 


au ouppvji uwu noiui fjeate- -r* , __ _ — . — , — uw 

keepers in the eastern Bosnian Jl eaCekeCDCT Hole s V non ^ . nK ? e mod crate ® 

town of Bihac to when the air a the territories. 


strikes were finally approved. 

But it said that two hours of the 
delay were caused by the UN mili- 
tary, partly because of a changing 
situation on tbe ground. Yasushi 
Akashi, tbe UN chief representa- 
tive in the Balkans, took another 
hour to give his consent. 

The March 12 events have result- 
ed in sharp criticism against tbe 
United Nations from Washington 
and Paris about tbe time taken to 
protect UN troops in trouble. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Agence Fnmce-Prene 

TOKYO — Japan’s defense 
chief, Kazuo Airtu. said Sunday 
that his country should contribute 
more to United Nations peace- 
keeping activities. 

“Tbe role of Japanese self-de- 
fense forces to contribute to world 
peace and stability through ihe 
United Nations will become big- 
ger,” Mr. Aichi said in a speech 
during graduation ceremonies at 
the National Defense A 
Yokosuka, southwest of T< 


uku ut- ~e — - ' TT “~ J A n * m 

bomthe United Slates Srical ones first ^ ARAFAT: 'The Peace of the Brave,’ PLO Chief Says 


John K. Cooley, an ABC Newt 
correspondent and author based in 
Cyprus, wrote this for the Interna- 
tinted Herald Tribune. 


Continued from Page 1 


ghrates basin conflict, among Tur- 


Syria and Iraq; the Indus ba- 
sin. between India and Pakistan, 
and the Nile basin, between Egypt, 
Sudan and seven other African 
states. 

The Jordan dispute, reflected to- 
day in the difficulty Israel would 
have in giving up the water sources 
it captured from Jordan (West 
Bank wells; Jordan and Yannuk 
river runoff) and from Syria (the 
Baniyas, one of the Jordan’s main 
sources, in tbe Golan Heights) in 
tbe 1967 war, is the book’s center- 
piece. Among a few points of tight 
in the controversy have been the 
unpubticized but important multi- 
lateral meetings on sharing and 
planning of water resources, held 
among Israel Jordan and the Pal- 
estinians — the Syrians and Leba- 
nese give primacy to overcoming 
the political deadlock with Israel 
before talking seriously about wa- 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

g TUDY tbe diagramed deal 


ter^and haw staged away. 


From the earnest years of pro- 
state planning by Israels founding 
fathers, the United States and 


and conader how Sooth should 
play in six hearts after an opening 
trump lead. If you can solve it, your 
card play is of a high order, and you 
do not need lessons, even from Bill 
Root of Boca Raton, Florida, often 
described as the weald’s leading 
bridge teacher. 

He provided the deal but it win 
not be found in his series of b ridg e 
videotapes. 

South's final kangaroo leap to six 
hearts is overly aggressive, since 
North is likely to have cither three 
poor trumps or a doubleton. Bui 
the contract is a good one, because 
north’s trumps are decidedly better 
than they might be. 

After a trumps lead, woo with 
dummy’s jack. South must plan to 
make use of the club suit. All nor- 


mal attempts mil fail and the solu- 
tion is unexpected. At tbe second 
trick South must lead a low dub 
from dummy. 

It does not matter what the de- 
fense does, but assume East wins 
and leads a diamond. South wins 
with the ace, crosses to the heart 
king, and ruffs % low dub with a 
low trump- The dubs are now es- 
tablished, so be can draw the miss- 
ing trumps and claim the slam, us- 
ing dummy’s spade king as an 
entry. He makes five trump tricks 
in his hand, four dubs, two spades 
and one diamond. If the defense 
shifts to spades. South must win in 
hand to preserve ihe crucial entry 
to the dummy. 

An alternative plan appears to 
work, but does not. If South imme- 
diately cashes two club winners 
and ruffs a club, pennitting an 
ovemiff, he can establish clubs but 


vrill have only 1 1 tricks. It takes an 
original spade lead, attacking 
South's communications, to defeat 
the slam. 


in Tunis for more than a week. 

Recommendations for measures 
to assure the prolection of Palestin- 
ians and tbe presence of foreign 
observers in the occupied territo- 
ries were also inducted in a United 
Nations Security Council resolu- 
tion passed Friday. It was one of 
several conditions sought by the 
PLO for the resumption of talks. 

Palestinian officials had also de- 


manded that 42 Jewish settler fam- 
ilies tiring in six different sites in 
the center of Hebron, an otherwise 
Arab dty of 110,000, should be 
moved. 

Israel's position, so far, has been 
to assemble the settlers into one or 


would they blame? I am their lead- 
er and they have no one else to 
blame. We have been talking about 
peace for seven months, but all we 
have is broken promises. People 
have the right to be furious.” 

But he put much of the responsi- 


two locations. But it has main- bility for failing to implement the 
tained that tbe fate of any Jewish accord signed by the PLO and Isra- 
settlements should be the subject of el in September, which includes the 


NORTH (D) 

♦ K S A 
5KJ 
O 10 6 

*A K8732 

EAST 

* J 10 9 
<7 63 
O 9532 

* Q 10 9 4 
SOUTH 

♦ A863 
9AQ542 
<* A Q 7 

♦ 5 

Both sides are vulnerable- The Wd- 


WEST 

* Q7 2 
<7 109 87 
O KJ84 

* J 6 


ding: 

North 

East 

South 

West 

1 * 

Pass 

1 0 

Pass 

2 0 

Pass 

2* 

Pass 

30 

Pass 

e«3 

Pass 

pass 

Pass 




West leads tbe heart ten. 


DEATH NOTICE 


PHILUP Paul Karrh 


53, of Albuquerque. New Mexico 
, died une 


and Paris, died unexpectedly ir 
Paris, February 25th, 1994. 

He is survived by his mother, 
Maudine Karrh. sisrers, 
Paula Fisher and Phyllis Karrh, 
and brother in law, Hon Fislier. 

Because of his lifelong interest in 
literature and a recent visit to a 
literacy project in Africa. 


die family requests memorial 
contributions tie made 1 


to the 

Guardian Angels of Conakry, 
Guinea African ynulh literacy 
program, c/o Mrs. Judy Smith. 
54% 31S Street N.W.. 

Washington DC., 20015. 


further talks after implementation 
of the first phase of the peace plan, 
the withdrawal of Israeli troops 
from Jericho and the Gaza Strip. 

Mr. Arafat's somewhat optimis- 
tic comments were echoed by Uri 
Savir, the bead of the Israeli delega- 
tion and director-general erf the k- 


withdrawai of Israeli troops from 
Gaza and Jericho, on Mr. Rabin. 
He said the Israeli leader had “re- 
peatedly broken promises." 

M r. Arafat said bis strong im- 
pression from negotiating with Mr. 
Rabin and his foreign minister. 
Shimon Peres, with whom Mr. Ara- 


raeli Foreign Ministry. He spoke fat has established a warm rapport, 
before his departure from Tel Aviv is thar* there is a problem between 


for Tunis, where he arrived Sunday 
evening. 

“If the Palestinians want to im- 
plement the declaration or princi- 
ples. farad is ready," Mr. Savir 
said. “That is our main message lo 
their leaders." 

Die Palestinian leader conceded 
that much of the Palestinian anger 
over the Hebron massacre and the 
slow pace of peace talks had been 
directed at him. 

“Definitely they are blaming 
me, Mr. Arafat said. “Who else 


them.’ 

“Peres agrees with us on one 
thing and the next thing we know. 
Rabin vetoes it,” Mr. Arafat said. 
“Rabin keeps saying there are no 
sacred dates about withdrawals, 
about implementation of agree- 
ments, even after Peres makes a 
commitment." 

“This fa not a personal issue for 
me. but we have to remember what 
has happened." be said. “Agree- 
ments are sacred or they are not 
worth anything.” 


According to some estimates,-^ 
percent of the roughly 130,000 set- 
tlers are originally from the United 
States, many of them people who 
went straight from New Yoik'to 
the West Bank and who have 
best a tenuous connection to main- 
stream farad. The average Israeli 
on Saturday fa generally less inter- 
ested in the weekly Bible reacting 
than whether the Maccabi Haifa 
soccer team won yet a gain 
But while precise figures are hard 
to come by, American-Israelis are 
also prominent in disproportionate 
□umbers in leftist or liberal groups 
like Peace Now, Ae New law 
Fund and the Association for Civil' 
Rights in Israel. 

"Americans tend to fed that 
each person can make a difference, 
and so when they come here many 
gravitate to grass-roots movements 
akin to the ones they knew bad: 
home," said Galia Golan, a politi- 
cal scientist at Hebrew University 
who immigrated in 1966 and is a 
leader of Peace Now. 

Pan of whai separates the Amer- 
icans from others is that, as a 
group, they did not come here in 
desperation. In that sense, they live 
on a different plane from the hun- 
dreds of thousands of Moroccans, ■ 
Russians, Ethiopians, Romanians 
and others who simply wanted onl 
whether because of economic hard* ‘ 
5 ^P or religious persecution. 

“To leave America, you have to- 
be exlrerndy committed to your 
rision of society," said Leri Wei- 
man-Kelman, who cam e 12 years ■ 
ago from Manhattan and is a rarity . 
m Israel a Reform rabbi. 

Zeev Chafers, a Michigan- born ' 
writer and 15 years ago a spokes- 
man for the government of Mena- • 
diem Begin, said: “People who ' 
move here are highly motivated 
ideologically. They want to fed 
that there's a deeper purpose, 
whether it’s religious or Zionist. So . 
it s not surprising that there’s this * 
activism among the Americans.” 











Massa^ 

^ Loiie i 

Testi m« n 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


Page 5 


Indi 


ic ate 8 ’ 


MIA Search Ends in Vietnam Prosecutors 

23-Day Operation Turned Up Many Remains Weigh Deal 


c5 R iM L ;;r v, 

cr? -- m •■S ie.ff 
non;'-, • _ " 

da-, 

L ,ii . •. ‘Tilai. ^ 


Eh'- «= 

•l,. ■ ... 

. * Je:: ' ll, -afc, 

:n?rr- ;••. ." '!'* 

:hr :v . 1 ‘'t- rJ>, 

Th, r . * 

&V :r 

-■ At. ,r- bit 

if ^ 

' 0 V'- • -s, 

i! :r,r ...-. -.■£*, 

: ^d hr .. ' * Vn«S 

K «••'«'; 

n.’.j- ...: L “"" * J*,. 

'.i h, ..... •’ ■‘"’•^iir.J 

Or nih,. 

M: 

h!> irc-'-i'- V Ci * 
-*.> .- •• 

:;v r * 

, k vV\ r ;. *■*■■** 

y. 

. : ': r r ' 

jKV.'-' 

: v; :• 

•'. *’ ’ 25 

v.. . : 


- -r.-i; 

"Hrs 


• ■’ 2; 

- --- N 
-■ 'i <s 


- . ir. .. 

:•: . :•! 


The Associated Pros 

HANOI —The United States on Sunday ended the 
biggest recovery operation since the Vietnam War for 
_ Americans missing tn action, one that will weigh 
heavily in future relations between Washington and 
Hanoi. 

on added significance because it was thefirst search 

Pr “ d “ t Clinton 
hftea the U.S. trade embargo against Vietnam on Feb. 

The president said the United States wanted “more 
cooperation and more answers” before it established 
diplomatic relations with Vietnam. 

“Preliminary reports from team leaders and based 
on my two visits to the field in both the North and 
South “that cooperation continues to be excellent,” 
Colonel Cray said, “They continue to work with us.” 

Colone l Cray said the joint U.S.-Vietnaracse teams 
recovered remains believed to be those of missing 
Amc ncana at crash and burial sites on this operation, 
the 28th joint search since the fall of 1988. 

Inkeeping with U.S. policy, Colonel Cray would 
not disclose how many sets of remains were recovered 
pending a joint U.S.- Vietnamese forensics review in 


early Api U to determine whether they are American or 
Asian. 

More than 200 Americans and Vietnamese, about 
equally divided, covered a record 23 provinces. Colo- 
nel Cray said 14 sites were excavated and more than 60 
cases investigated. 

A similar operation is scheduled for April. 

The United States lists 2^34 Americans missing in 
action, in Southeast Asia, including 1,643 in Vietnam, 
505 in Laos, 78 in Cambodia and 8 in C hina. 

■ Hanoi Arrests Dissident 

Vietnamese authorities have arrested a leading dis- 
sident. Vietnamese sources said Sunday, Agence 
France- Pr esse reported from Hanoi. 


in the southern city said. 

Mr. Ho. a former Viet Cong guerrilla, trade union 
leader and party figure, had penned and circulated an 
article calling for greater democracy and respect for 
human rights in Vietnam, according to the uA-based 
human rights group, Asia Watch. 

Mr. Ho, who is in his 70s, was held under house 
arrest from September 1990 to May 1993 after trying 
to form a veterans' association independent of the 
Communist Party. 


Sayra Fischer Lebenthal, 95, Dies; 
A Co-Founder of Wall Street Firm 


Sew York Tima Service 

NEW YORK - Sayra Fischer 
Lebenthal, 95, a Wall Street legend 
who was a co-founder in 1925 of 
the investment-banking firm Le- 
bentbal & Co. and remained active 
in it for 67 years, died here Thurs- 
day after a long illness, her family 
sauL 

Mrs. Lebenthal was a newlywed 
when she and her husband, Louis S. 
Lebenthal. set up shop in a tiny 
office with second-hand furniture 
and no nigs. They sought their 
niche as bond traders and found it 
They looked for odd lots of small- 
denomination bonds from estates 
and other neglected sources and 
offered them to relatively modest 
savers. 

The company thrived, continu- 
ing to do so after the death of Louis 
Lebenthal in 1951. Mrs. Lebenthal 
decided to stay in business. She 
specialized in tax-exempt munici- 
pal bonds for small investors, and 
watched the market for them soar. 

Mai Zetterfing, 68, Swedish 
Actress and Director, Dies 

LONDON (Reuters) — The 
Swediah-born actress and director 
Mai Zetterfing, 68, has died of can- 
cer Thursday m London. 

Miss Zetterling made her stage 
and screen debut at 16 in Stock- 
holm. After appearing in several 
Swedish films, she was invited to 
Britain in 1946 to star m the film 
“Frieda.” 


She co-starred with Anjelica 
Huston in Nicholas Roeg's 1989 
film “The Witches" and appeared 
in the 1990 film “Hidden Agenda,” 
directed by Ken Loach. Earlier no- 
table roles were in “Knock on 
Wood” with Danny Kaye, “Des- 
perate Moment” with Dirk Bo- 
garde and “Only Two Can Play” 
with Peter Sellers, hi the early 
] 960s, she made her directorial de- 
but with a documentary, “The War 
Game,” which she co-wrote with 
her second husband, David 
Hughes, and which won first prize 
at the Venice Film Festival in 1963. 
Junnosuke Ofusa, 86, Dies; 
Worked for New York Times 

TOKYO (NYT) — Junnosuke 
Ofusa, 86, who managed the Tokyo 
bureau of The New York Times for 
nearly six decades, died of a heart 
attack Saturday, said his son, No- 
buo Ofusa. 

Mr. Ofusa was faired in 1930 by 
the first bureau chief for The Times 
in Tokyo, Hugh Byas. The Japa- 
nese government, which in prewar 
days suspected he was a spy, later 
honored him. In 1982, Emperor Hi- 
rohito decorated him with the 
Fourth Class Order of the Sacred 
Treasure. 

Joseph Barry, 76, Is Dead; 
Wrote on French Culture 
Joseph Barry, 76, an American 
writer, journalist and critic of 
French culture and history, died of 
cancer Tuesday in Paris. 


Mr. Barry's books included: 
“Left Bank, Right Bank” (1951), 
“The People offiris”( 1 966), "Pas- 
sions ana Politics, a Biography of 
Versailles” (1972), “Infamous 
Woman: The Life of George Sand” 
(1976), and “French Lovers: From 
Hdoise and Abelard to Beauvoir 
and Sartre” (1987). 

Vladimir Alexandrovich Tik- 
honov, 66, a pro-reform economist 
and a member of President Boris 
N. Yd tain's advisory council, died 
Wednesday in Moscow. 

Inin Flores. 69, a Puerto Rican 
nationalist leader and one of four 
independence supporters who at- 
tacked the U.S. Congress in 1954, 
died of cancer Saturday in San 
Juan. 

The Third Eari of lncfacape, 76, 
who was bom Kenneth James Wil- 
liam Mackay and who shaped his 
family's global trading empire into 
Inch cape and Co. and ca ptained 
dripping giant P and O Steam 
Navigation Co., has died. No time 
or cause of cteath was given. 

Norman F. Dacey, 85, an author 
whose book “How to Avoid Pro- 
bate” infuriated many lawyers in 
the United States, died Wednesday 
in London of complications from a 
circulatory disease. 

Lewis Grizzard, 47, a newspaper 
columnist and author of “Daddy 
Was a Pistol and Pm a Son of a 
Gun,” died Sunday after heart sur- 
gery in Atlanta. 


Weigh Deal 
In Spy Case 

Washington Pat Secrlit 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
lawyers and prosecutors in the case 
of the spy suspect Aldrich Kazan 
Ames and his wife have agreed to 
delay any indictment of the two, a 
move that indicates the couple may 
be negotiating guilty pleas, accord- 
ing to legal sources. 

A two-page agreement, signed by 
attorneys and the couple, was ap- 
proved by a judge in U.S. District 
Court in Alexandria, Virginia. It 
delays an indictment for at least 30 
more daw, from the previous dead- 
line of Wednesday, and provides 
for prosecutors to give defense law- 
yers an early look at the evidence 
they have accumulated. 

Guilty pleas are frequently 
reached in nugor spy cases. The 
government sometimes can offer 
consideration at sentencing in re- 
turn for the help of the accused in 
identifying others who have en- 
gaged in espionage, the sources 
said. 

“If Ames can give up four or five 
pepple, particularly if they are U.S. 
citizens m this country, the govern- 
ment will at up and take notice,” 
one lawyer sain. 

Prosecutors also want to get the 
early cooperation of the couple so 
that the Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy con assess damage done to na- 
tional security and avoid a cumber- 
some trial in which information 
about covert activities must be de- 
classified before it can be discussed 
publicly. 


Inkaiha Denies 
Collaborating in 
Police Violence 

The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — The 
Zulu nationalist Inkatba Freedom 
Party said Sunday that allegations 
that it colluded with police to insti- 
gate violence were propaganda to 
discredit the group. 

Inkatha's central committee 
called on President Frederik W. de 
Klerk to admit that there was no 
evidence that the alleged violence 
campaign was officially sanctioned 
by the group. 

“This is another in the series of 
'dirty tricks,' ” designed to discred- 
it Inkatha and its leadership, the 
central committee said. 

Nelson Mandela, leader of the 
African National Congress, said 
Sunday that he supported Mr. de 
Klerk’s call for an international in- 
vestigation of the “very serious and 
very grave” allegations. 





l«ri Kithaoih'Acmcc F ram e- Ptum 

COUNTDOWN —Posters marking the seat locations of actors and actresses at the Los Angeles Music Center in preparation for 
the 66th Annual Academy Awards program on Monday night Steven Spielberg’s “Schindler's List” is the leading contender. 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


Alaska Recovering Slowly 
From Exxon Valdez Oil Spill 

Time and tides have been kind to Prince 
William Sound in Alaska in the five years 
since the tanker Exxon Valdez rammed a. 
charted reef, dumping nearly 1 1 million gal- 
lons (42 million liters) of crude oil. The Asso- 
ciated Press reports. 

Storms have scoured the 1 300 miles (2,400 
kilometers) of polluted e<*«tlinc. removing 
about half the ofl embedded in some places. 
Many beaches look dean. Population fore- 
casts for bald eagles are good. The tourists 
are back. 

Bui harbor seals, sea otters, pink salmon. 
Pacific herring and several kinds of birds 
show “little or no sign” of recovery, the state 
says. 

But in large part, “it's behind us,” said a 
spokesman for Governor Walter J. HickeL 
whose administration won a S900 million 
settlement from Exxon Corp- in 1991. 

It is not over for the people of Cordova, 
home port to the sound's commercial fishing 
fleet. Fishermen are among the plaintiffs who 
filed damage claims after the accident on 
March 24, 1989. Their cases are only now 
coming to trial. They blame the Valdez spill 
for bad salmon harvests in the last two years. 
And they blame Exxon for delaying tactics. 
The company denies this. 

A federal class-action suit, scheduled to 


start May 2, includes thousands of potential 
plaintiffs. Some estimates put the possible 
damages at Sl-S billion or more. 

Short Takes 

Not aO Japanese- Americans were sent to 
relocation centers after Pearl Harbor, Warren 
Tsuneishi recalls in a letter to The New York 
Times. After the United States entered World 
War II, hundreds of Nisei — native Ameri- 
cans of Japanese ancestry — were recruited 
for the 99th Regimental Combat Team, 
which fought in Europe and was awarded 
more decorations than any other American 
unit of its size. Mr. Tsuneishi recalls that even 
earlier, on Nov. 1, 1941, more than a month 
before the war, the U.S. Army set up the 
Military Intelligence Service (Japanese) Lan- 
guage School at the Presidio m San Francis- 
co. Faculty and students were mostly Nisei. 
About 6,000 graduates served throughout the 
war in Asia and the Pacific, translating cap- 
tured military documents, interrogating pris- 
oners and serving as interpreters. “We were 
credited with shortening the war," Mr. Tsun- 
eishi recalls, “and we were indispensable in 
the occupation of Japan.” 

Experts wonder whether doctors are over- 
prescribing the genetically engineered hor- 
mone that adds inches to children whose 
growth is lagging for lack of the hormone, 
The Washington Post reports. The drug does 
nothing for children who are short not for 
lack of the hormone but because of their 
genes. And the three weekly injections in the 
thigh are expensive, costing $10,000 a year or 
more. Only about 7,000 children in the Unit- 
ed States suffer from classical growth hor- 


mone deficiency, a syndrome that can leave 
them 4 feet (about 1.2 meters) tall os adults. 
But according to Med Ad news, a trade 
publication, the drug is now being given to an 
estimated 20,000 to 25,000 children. 


uviuvui hum ivyvu jyi ty-i/wmiw 

graffiti — the point just beads up ana slides 
off — is being developed by Dow Chemical 
Co. The surface is superior to Teflon because 
it is nonporous and easier to manufacture. In 
siickabihty, the new coating is between 1 1 
and 16, compared to 18 for Teflon, 40 for 
plastic and 80 for copper and steel. 

Four-leaf dorers are bang shipped all over 
the United States at S10 for a small pot by 
John Pieraross, who owns a plant nursery in 
Apopka, Florida. Mr. Piergross owns the ex- 
clusive rights to grow and market a strain of 
clover that grows with four leaves, an age-old 
symbol of luck, without fail. The strain was 
developed by two University of Florida bota- 
nists. David Wofford and David Ballen- 
sperger. 

Some recycling techniques have been 
around for a long time, Alan Them Doming, 
an envi ronmen talist, notes with approval: the 
public library, which saves people from buy- 
ing their own books, thus conserving whole 
forests; the corporate interdepartmental en- 
velope which can be used over and over, the 
bicycle, which gets you three times as far as 
walking on the same number of calories; and 
the backyard clothesline, which unlike the 
clothes dryer uses no electricity and gives you 
a chance to talk to your neighbors. 


Arthur Higbee 


-■ . • .■ 


Wr .• t . r ■ 

.. 

:>V 

! v - 

. 

."it 

£_’• - 



!5 

: ..y 


■ ’-1 


■..1, : s. . . 

• .-.•fllBD 


••Li ■- 


Fly the Toshiba T19-Series 


5 ISRAEL: 

.YrfC Dirty IW 

. ,-nn.n^ !rv>i Past I 


j <c--e 






a* 


In today's tough climate, every- 


- 


one is being asked to fly as far back in the 
plane as possible. But that doesn't neces- 
sarily have to mean coming off second 


best. With the Toshiba T 19-Series, econ- 


omy price means first-class performance. 


ALL MODELS 

• 8 KB cache. 4-20 MB RAM, 14.5 mm PCMCIA 2.0 slot, 
BallPolm* mouse 2,0 with QuickPort™, Toshiba MaxTime™ 
Power Management, graphics accelerator 

Toshiba T1910 (NEWT) 

• SL Enhanced !486*5X/33 MHz, 120 or 200 MB hard disk, 
9.5* Advanced (double-scan) STN monochrome LCD, 2.9 kg 

Toshiba T19I0C5 (NEW!) 

• SL Enhanced M86»5X/33 MHz. 120 or 200 MB hard disk, 
9.5" Advanced (double-scan) STN colour LCD, 3.2 kg 

Toshiba T 1 95 OCT 

• SL Enhanced i486™DX2/40 MHz, integrated XSpI 

co-processor, 200 or 320 MB hard disk, f Jgj 

8.4* active-matrix TFT colour LCD, local-bus ^ 

video. 3.2 kg 


YOU get Standard luxuries you won't find The Intel Inside logo Is a registered trademark of the Intel Corpora a or. 

on most entry-level models. All Toshiba there's even a choice of colour screens. 
T 19-Series notebooks come equipped with All this conies at surprisingly low prices. 


ft ■<: 


super-fast, energy-saving i486 processors. If you would like to find out more, call 






mm 


£\f 




m 2 : 




a large hard disk, a graphics accelerator, your local Toshiba reseller and get 
AutoResume and a direct-connect ready to fly — Toshiba class. 
ly BallPoint® mouse. With the PCMCIA Contact: Toshiba Europa (I.E.) GmbH, 
m slot the sky's the limit when it comes IPS Business Group, Hammfelddamm 8, 
* to expansion and connectivity. And D-41460 Neuss, Germany. 


In Touch with Tomorrow 

TOSHIBA 









a*. 


Hcralh 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribune 


FUBUSHtiU WITH THX NKW VORK TTMKX AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


A Clearing Over Bosnia 


Hie telling aspect of the new accords be- 
tween Bosnia's Muslims and Croats, and be- 
tween their new federation and Croatia, is that 
they were signed in the White House. The 
ceremony on Friday deepens the Clin ion ad- 
ministration's engagement with a crisis it bad 
earlier shunned. The key change came with the 
president's belated decision to confront the 
Bosnian Sobs and apply farce to relieve Saraje- 
vo. It worked, and this success gave bite to the 
next, diplomatic phase, by which the United 
States has now pointed two of Bosnia’s com- 
batants toward peace and provided leverage to 
deal with the third, jhe Sens. A third phase of 
extended peacekeeping, in winch the United 
Slates ought at least to match the example of 
France and others, is now opening. 

The White House agreements require par- 
ties that were successively allies, enemies and 
allies to rise above sheer ethnicity and return 
at least partway to the coexistence they prac- 
ticed before the war. This is meant to be done 
within a framework of respect Tor minority 
rights; bad this frameworit been worked out 
two years ago, a horrendous slaughter might 
have been averted. For the Muslims, the new 
arrangements promise to reverse some of the 
war’s “ethnic cleansing" and territorial con- 
quest; to reverse much more would take an 


unimaginable measure of foreign interven- 
tion. For the Croats, these arrangements are 
an essentia] ticket bask to Western favor. 

Bosnia's Serbs, the war’s chief tarorizers to 
this day, sit on their territorial gains but have 
been put on the political defensive. The Unit- 
ed States is finally in tbs gBme against them, a 
Uttle militarily, a lot diplomatically. Russia is 
newly in the game with them but, so far, is 
defining their interests in ways promoting 
accommodation. Their patron state of Serbia 
is hurting badly under sanctions. These 
should be eased only in phases. First, Bosnia 
most be patched up; this means substantial 
Serbian territorial withdrawal Croatia, which 
is partly occupied by Serbia, must also be 
patched up, with due concern for Croatia's 
own Serbs. War crimes must be prosecuted. 

If the prospect in the northern Balkans is 
looking up, it is still ominous in the southern 
Balkan s Further Serbian repression of the Al- 
banian majority in Kosovo could set things off. 
So could an uprising by ethnic Albanians there 
or elsewhere in the region. Greece’s dangerous 
and punitive hysteria about Macedonia needs 
to be addressed urgently by Athens’ NATO 
allies. The work done last week in (he White 
House was far from the last of it 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Why Whitewater Matters 


From President Bill Clinton on down, im- 
portant Democrats would have us believe that 
the Whitewater mess is a confection spun by 
Republicans with little else to talk about and 
media types with little else to da This argu- 
ment resonates powerfully with many Ameri- 
cans who, the polls say, find Whitewater im- 
possibly complicated and irrelevant to the 
major concerns in their lives. 

But there are reasonable people, including 
many who wish Mr. Clinton well who believe 
that Whitewater has raised serious questions 
that deserve serious inquiry. 

This quizzical cohort is not exclusively 
composed of frustrated Republicans and fe- 
brile reporters. Senator Daniel Patrick Moy- 
nihan railed for the appointment of a special 
prosecutor in January, just when Mrs. Clinton 
was saying that none was necessary. 

□ 

Thursday, the Senate voted unanimously to 
hold public hearings, “s tinctured and se- 
quenced" so as not to interfere with the 
Whitewater special prosecutor, Robert Fiske. 

House leaders, who have been stonewalling 
any hearings, should foDow suit. Representa- 
tives Dan Rostenkowski and Lee Hamilton, 
two influential Democrats, have now asserted 
a congressional interest in the matter. In this 
they agree with Representative Jim Leach 
(and that improbable champion of govern- 
ment ethics. Senator Alfonse D' Amato) that 
Congress has the right to hold hearings as long 
as they do not undermine Mr. Fiske. 

Thai has pretty much been our stance since 
Whitewater resurfaced in the news late last 
year. There are interesting and important 
questions here, and the best person to get to 
the bottom of them is the special prosecutor. 

That said. Congress cannot be restrained 
forever from examining issues in Much it has 
a legitimate interest — including posable 
abuses of power by the White House and the 
malfunctioning of government agencies that 
are supposed to protect the taxpayer. 

□ 

Whitewater raises at least two important 
policy issues that fall within the oversight 
authority of the House and Senate banking 
committees. One involves the integrity of 
the banking system, the other the integrity 
of its regulators. 

The banking issue arises from (he 1989 
collapse of Madison Guaranty, an Arkansas 
savings and loan. Madison's failure cost tax- 
payers $60 million in bailout funds, a huge 
loss for a small institution. 

About Madison, there are several ques- 
tions. One is whether a state regulator ap- 
pointed by Governor Clinton ignored Madi- 
son’s shoddy lending practices because it was 
owned by the Clintons’ political ally, James 
McJDougal who was also the Clintons' busi- 
ness partner in Whitewater Development Co. 

Another is whether some of Madison’s 
funds were used to retire a $50,000 debt 
incurred during Mr. Clinton's 1984 re-elec- 
tion campaign for governor, or otherwise ben- 
efited the Ctintons. A third is whether deposi- 
tors’ funds or campaign funds were used to 
shore up Whitewater. 

□ 

Even if all the answers turn out to be yes. 
Mr. Clinton himself may have been an inno- 
cent bystander. But Mr. Fiske and the rele- 
vant committees of Congress have a perfect 
right to find out what Madison was up to, 
both as a scandal in and of itself and as an 
illustration of the rot in the soul of the savings 
and loan system during the careless 1980s. 

Any investigation of Madison will inevita- 
bly touch on Whitewater Co. itself, not only 
because Madison money may have been tun- 
neled to Whitewater but because the Clintons 
owned half the business. 

Did the Clintons pay the same amount for 
their half-share as Mr. McDougal paid for 
his? How much money did Whitewater lose? 

These questions are important, at least to 
Mr. Fiske, because they boar on whether the 


Clintons received gifts or claimed undeserved 
tax deductions in connection with 
Whitewater. The hints from the White House 
that the Clintons may owe more taxes than 
they paid only fuel the interest 
Inevitably, too, the investigations will touch 
the Rose Law Firm. Mrs. Clinton represented 
Madison when it was struggling to stay afloat; 
Webster Hubbefl, who has resigned from his 
Justice Department post represented the gov- 
ernment in a lawsuit against Madison’s ac- 
countants after Madison went under. 

A key question is whether Mr. Hubbell 
told the government about the firm’s earlier 
advocacy of Madison, an apparent conflict 
of interest 

The second big duster of issues involves the 
integrity of the regulators who are supposed 
to protect the public against bad banking 
practices. The Treasury Department, through 
the Resolution Trust Corporation, is responsi- 
ble for cleaning up the savings and loan mess. 

A few weeks ago. Treasury officials re- 
vealed that they had given the former White 
House counsel Bernard Nussbaum and other 
senior aides "heads up" briefings on Resolu- 
tion Trust’s own investigation of Madison — 
including the RTCs decision to refer the 
case to the justice Department for criminal 
investigation. 

Given tire Clintons' close political and fi- 
nancial relationship with Madison’s owner, 
those meetings were improper on their face. 
Mr. Fiske wants to know why they were held 
and whether they compromised the RTCs 
independence — a polite way of asking 
whether justice was obstructed. 

The House and Senate Banking Com- 
mittees have a legitimate interest in the 
same questions. 

□ 

Mr. Leach has also expressed concern that 
the administration may have improperly 
quashed a field investigation by the Resolu- 
tion Trust’s Kansas City office. And on 
Wednesday, Stephen Labaton of Hie New 
York Times reported that Treasury officials 
rejected a request by Bran McCormally, a 
senior investigator in the Office of Thrift 
Supervision, to open a parallel probe of 
Madison. 

The thrift office has a larger staff and 
greater enforcement powers than the RTC; 
Mr. McCormally supervised the inquiry into 
a Denver savings and loan in which Neil 
Bush, President George Bush’s son, was a 
principal. Mr. Fiske and the banking com- 
mittees will obviously want to know wby 
the Clinton administration told Mr. McCbr- 
mally to go away. 

□ 

Those are some of the policy questions that 
make Whitewater a weightier matter than the 
“bunch of foolishness" James CarviHe says it 
is. But there is one more reason why a lot of 
disinterested people are curious to learn more, 
and that is the strange behavior of the White 
House over the past few months. 

If the White House has nothing to conceal 
openness is the obvious antidote. But from 
the beginning (he White House has been any- 
thing but open. 

Files disappear from the late Vincent Fos- 
ter’s office, some of them related to 
Whitewater. Regulators appear for secret 
briefings. The president's wife and Vice Presi- 
dent A1 Gore spend days trying to block the 
appointment of a special prosecutor. Senior 
assistants are diverted from policy-making 
to damage control. 

AU this from a White House crowd that 
rode into Washington proclaiming a new era 
of candor. Throw in the resignations of Mr. 
Nussbaum and Mr. Hubbell and the ques- 
tions begin to multiply and expand. 

One is this: What is the White House trying 
to hide? That lends an undeniable piquancy to 
what will inevitably be a complex, drawn-out 
but throughly necessary inquiry. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED tap 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cn-Churmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN. Publisher A Chief £mvrhv 
JOHN VINOCUR. Executive Edixr <£ Vk-e President 

• WALTER WELLS. NemE&or • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
CHARLES MTTCHELMORE. Deputy Ei&nn • CAW-OTWDGZAs»iciw£aBw- 

• ROBERT J- DONAHUE, EtMorcf the FiEmnd Pages • JONATHAN GAGE, Business emd Finance Editor 

* RENE BQNDY. Deputy Publisher* JAMES McLEOD. Advertising Direuar 
•JVANn’Al.CASPARLfrBemtainnaiDei'einiimenrDitmnru ROBERT PARREL GttMn Director. Europe 

Directeur de lit Pahboainn : Richard D.Snvnrmx 


IrtcmalKwil Hcnikl Tribune. 181 Avenue OariCfrdcGddte. 9252 1 NeuiBy-^ur-Scjne. France. 

TcL : | J 1 4637.93.0Q. Fax : Cnc, 46J7J165 1 : AJv. 463751 1 1 Irtcmct lHT@ajrokom.ie 
Editor Jot Ashe Mkhaet Rhhanhm. 5 Oatterfvrv RL Sneepatr 0511. TeL tOS} 472-77fA Fax: t65) 77J-? t U 
Mur. Dir. Asia. ttyl). KmtqvhL 50 Obverse: toL.HntRKtmtt.TfL XS2-9222-IIM. Fax: XS2-9222-IM 
Mint. Dir. V.K.. Picn Diucre. M Lana A err. Union WC1 Tel. Itffll XJ6-4SQ2, Fuk 240-2254 
Cm My. Gcniitn: IV Uvserhah Fnatridhsie. 15. H02J f-naifan/M. TeL WWl 726755Fuc fUWj 72 7J Hi 
PHsdL'hs Mkl M i Ciwin. X50 Thud Air. Nhr YurL A’ K ttJ/122 Tel. f 2I2f 7S2 JNW. Fol (20 755406 
S..t »M« ivpiiiil de /.’flftiMI F. RCS NtuUerfr B 7J2H2 1 1 2ft. Ctvnmii\itui Porhaire M«, 61.1.17 
t IW. bOcntiund Hnuki Trihtne. AH riifits rtvnvd. ISSN: MJWJW52 



Off-Camera, the Afghans’ Agony Goes On 


N EW YORK — Bombs are raining on Af- 
ghan civilians. Since January, heavy fight- 


in: 


r across Afghanistan as a 
itant fundamentalist prime minister and a 
former Communist general wage war with a 
fundamentalist presideuL 

This week. United Nations Secretary-General 
Bulros Butros Ghali will dispatch a newly ap- 
pointed personal envoy to try to negotiate an 
end to the fighting. 

The peace effort is long overdue. In Kabul the 
A fghan capital there are house searches, round- 
ups and rapes, many of them by former mujahi- 
din — the “holy warriors" who fought the Soviet- 
backed Communist regime during the 1980s — 
who are allied with one faction or the other. 

Militia fighters launch rockets behind a barri- 
cade of human corpses. A woman escapes her 
burning borne, leaving behind the bodies of her 
husband and 4-year-old son. 

A man flees bis devastated house where 15 
family members died, victims of mortar shells. 
As they try in vain to reach the Pakistani border, 
his 8-mcxuh-old baby freezes to death. 

A fundamentalist commander throws 14 peo- 
ple from the roof of a mosque; they were j 
incorrectly. Tens of thousands have ~ 
for refugee camps in Pakistan. 


By Charles Norchi 

But since January, Pakistan has turned away 
truckloads of desperate, hungry and shell- 
shocked Afghans at the border, and they are now 
camped outride the city of Jalalabad on a harsh, 
dry and windy plateau near the Khyber Pass. 

Local Afghans trained by the United Nations 
are still removing thousands of land mines and 
unexploded shells from this desolate place. 

Five years after the last Russian troops left, 
there is still a war in Afghanistan. 

The h uman rights abuses are horrific. Unlike 
those in Sarajevo, they are not captured by televi- 
sion cameras. The Afghans have been victims of 
indiscriminate bombing, torture and mutilation. 

Restrictions on the rights of women and on 
freedom of association and expression are on the 
rise; so is religious intolerance. Nearly 15 million 
land mines scattered throughout the country con- 
tinue to marm and kHL 

Afghanistan's prime minis ter, Gulbuddixi 
H ekmat yar. is an extremist and a dangerous 
opportunist who despises the West and for 
years has cracked the whip in the name of Allah. 
The United States, and other friends of Af- 
ghanistan, gave him that whip by a rmin g 


the mujahidin, his allies, daring the 1980s. 

For the first time, Afghanistan is becoming 
fertile ground for the breeding and export of 
militant Islamic fundamentalism. It is the ideolo- 
gy of a desperate people, and the seeds of desper- 
ation are taking fool With the virtual breakdown 
of law and order, radical fundamentalist training 
camps have been flourishing. 

As wdl as negotiating a solution to the con- 
flict. the UN’s new envoy needs to draw up a 
more complete long-term plan, including disarm- 
ing irregular forces, creating a salaried Afghan 
army, stepping up operations to disarm the 
mines, bunding schools and hospitals and train- 
ing Afghan human rights monitors. 
^Eventually, the United Nations should also 
sponsor free elections. 

Afghans are victims of the games superpowers 
mice played Collectively we bear responsibility. 

If something is not done to stop the killing, 
Afghanistan will only produce refugees, radical 
fundamentalists and terrorists. 

Then study, some day, Afghanistan will again 
be our war. 


The writer is executive director of the Interna- 
tional League for Human Rigfus. He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


Why Do North Korea’s Neighbors Look So Calm? 


S EOUL — The big news this week 
from Northeast Asia is not the 
latest nuclear- tipped wrangling be- 
tween Pyongyang, Washington and 
Seoul It is a series of visits involving 
leaders of the three most powerful 
East Asian nations. These visits say 
more about what is happening in the 
region than the overtyped scaremon- 

wgring muring nut nf W ashingto n, and 

indeed the Western press generally, 
over Kim D Sung’s nuclear program. 

On Monday, Prime Minister Moii- 
hiro Hosokawa ends a three-day trip 
to China; bade in Tokyo, he wmgreet 
the South Korean prcsdent, Kim 
Young Sam, who arrives Thursday. 
From Japan, Mr. Kim will go on to 
Beijing to see President Jiang Zemin. 

But the headlines in the Western 
press have been about U.S. fleet 
movements, debate over sanctions, 
and a probable resumption of U.S.- 
South Korean military exercises. 
Such drum-beating must be music to 
the ears of Kim II Sung, whose only 
card Is to persuade the world that be 
is both more powerful and more irra- 
tional than he really is. The press 
reports strengthen his ability to bar- 
gam for aid and recognition. 

In fact, Mr. Kim is an old man who 
fears the United States and South 
Korea. Meanwhile, the common in- 
terests of China, Japan and South 
Korea are growing by the day and are 
unlikely to be thrown off course 


By Philip Bo wring 


by the Noth Korean nuclear issue. 

So far, the cooler heads in the U.S. 
State Department recognize both the 
limits of Kim U Sung's threat and the 
limits of what can be done about it 
But there is no shortage of hawks 
_ this issue to the Cuban 
; crisis and thus rhallenging [he 
backbone of the administration. 

That is not to imply a lack of con- 
cern in Seoul or Tokyo about Pyong- 
yang's nuclear ambitions. Kim II Sung 
is not suicidal but be has miscalculat- 
ed before. President Kim of South 
Korea, like Mr. Hosokawa, will urge 
Beijing to try to persuade Pyongyang 
to desiSL But China has probably gone 
as far as it can, short of supporting 
sanctions orjoimng a blockade against 
the North, that looks unlikely, partic- 
ularly given the poor state or U.S.- 
Chrna relations. Without GWinwa* sup- 
port, sanctions against the 
impoverished and already isolated 
North would have limited effect 

For South Korea, Pyongyang’s nu- 
clear and missile development is not 
yet important enough to jeopardize 
its burgeoning economic relationship 
with China. Two-way trade is run- 
ning at $10 billion a year. Korean 
investment in China is already SI 
billion. This is mostly in light indus- 
try, but Korean giants are now study- 
ing large, long-term investments 


in cars, steel and infrastructure. 

Cultural affinity and industrial 
complementarity outweigh any mis- 
givings that Seoul may have over po- 
litical stability in China, or Beijing's 
attitude to Pyongyang. 

Perhaps more important for Seoul 
any mishandling of the irudwr issue 
could exacerbate South Korea’s big- 
gest future problem — the economic 
integration of the backward North. 
The sooner a sensible start can be 
made on helping the North, the better. 

Fra China, the South presents a 
trade partner with which it has few 
recent quarrels, one which tries not to 
mix business and politics. It is also a 
useful counterweight to Japan. 

China probably regards eventual 
Korean reunification as inevitable, 
and nothing to be feared. A strong 
Korea could be a useful ally. 

Meanwhile, for a chaouc Russia, 
Korea is a useful partner. The tie may 
be practical rather than warm, but it is 
better than Russia's relationships with 
Japan and China. There are no territo- 
rial issues; trade is growing fast Presi- 
dent Kim will visit Moscow in June. 

Japan has interests in developing 
ties with both China and Korea. It 
trails other nations in investing in Chi- 
na, but its deteriorating relations with 
America could change this. It wifl find 
a receptive audience in China. 


Troubling Signs of a Sense of Cultural Superiority 


W ASHINGTON — As if Bfll 
Clinton did not have enough to 
worry about, the UJ5. president has 
brushed into a diplomatic hornet's 
nest that pits the urban American 
teenager’s passion for graffiti against 
an Asian society's demand for confor- 
mity and rigid public order. 

Singaporean Graffiti is not a movie 
about rock and roll muse in Asia. It 
is a story about an exaggerated law 
and order reflex in a multiethnic city- 
state that fears for its physical and 
cultural survival. That reflex has in- 
flicted a draconian punishment on 
Michael Fay, 18, of Dayton, Ohio. 

But the drama surrounding Mr. 
Fay also reflects the continuing sense 
of cultural superiority many Asians 
(Chinese in particular) feel toward 
many foreign nations (America in 
particular). And h contains echoes of 
the newly ominous dash between 
China and the United States over 
hitman rights. 

Hie acts of vandalism of which Mr. 
Fay has been convicted represent ap- 
palling and dangerous behavior m 
straitlaced Singapore, which smugly 
covets the prosperity and calm it has 
achieved after the destruction of 
World Warn and the Malay guerrilla 
campaign. The authorities decided to 
make Mr. Fay a horrible example. He 
was sentenced to six lashes on the 
buttocks with a moistened rattan 
cane, four mouths in prison and 
a$Z230 fine. 

The colonial-era form of flogging, 
adminis tered by an official trained in 
mart lit arts usin g a half -inch (IJ2 
centimeters) thick cane, leaves per- 
manent scars and frequently throws 
prisoners into shock. 

The United States has registered a 
“strong protest" Mr. Clinton termed 
Mr. Fays punishment “extreme" and 


By Jim HoagLand 


is seeking clemency for the youth. 
Other UJS. officials said that Wash- 
ington would react sharply if the flog- 
ging was carried out 

In a confession that he subsequent- 
ly said was coerced and false, Mr. 
Fay admitted to spray-painting 18 
cars, throwing eggs at and swit 
license plates on other vehicles. 

In a society that frowns on chewing 
gum in public and bans foreign news- 
papas mat question minor aspects of 
the Singaporean way of life, these 
acts stirred outrage. 

“We do not have a situation where 
acts of vandalism are commonplace, 
as in cities like New Yoit, where even 
police cars are not spared the acts of 
vandals," (he Singapore Home Af- 
fairs Ministry said in a statement that 


vigorously defended the sentence 

But more is being expressed in 
such statements, and the flogging 
sentence itself, than a determination 
to let car owners and insurers sleep 
soundly at night in Singapore. In 
ways that make France's resistance to 
American cultural imperialism so 
much fun and games (which it is), 
Asian countries are assertively chal- 
lenging the encroachment of an 
enraging global culture on their 
traditional mores. 

It is possible to make too much of 
the clash of civilizations and cultures 
as the root of complex economic, 
strategic and political struggles. 
Theories that future world wars will 
spring inevitably from cultural dif- 
ferences do so. 



Sj HEW In Utaht Zm*m> [SiajjjMrel. CAW SpuMene. 


Now Let the Whitewater Show Begin 


N EW YORK — Let the hear- 
ings begin, and uy not to be 
distracted by the sideshow. 

There are flim-flanmras and ex- 
hibitionists and freak shows aplen- 
ty under the big top called 
Whitewater, a hyper-charged con- 
vergence of movers and shakers 
from the Ozarks with the power 
elite of the Washington Beltway. 

The New York Times tells us 
about a Mr. Bone, “who was known 
as Red," a professional poker player 
who served as Hillary Rodham Cun- 
ton's broker as she speculated in 
cattle futures. And there is Senator 
Alfonse D* Amato, a born-again eth- 
ics maven who has made a big splash 
as a pitchman whipping up interest 
in Whitewater with specious refer- 
ences to Watergate. 

Everyone is pointing fingers. 
President Bill Clinton lost bis cool 
in Boston over the fact that the 
Republicans are treating him so 
badly. At a Sl.OOO-a-plaie dinner 
on Monday, he pounced a lectern 
with his fist as be angrily asked, 
“Why ... are we confronted in 
this administration with an opposi- 
tion party that just stands up and 
says, ‘No, no, no, no, no, no, 
do. no, noT* 

The sharks in the Republican con- 


By Bob Herbert 

gressiona] delegation do seem to be 
perpetually chortling over the Gin- 
tons' discomfort. Others are less dis- 
creet Rachel Abrams, the wife of 
former Assistant Secretary of Slate 
EBiol Abrams, who was convicted of 
perjury in the Iran-Contra scandal 
wrote in The Washington Times that 
she understood (he pain the Clintons 
must be enduring and the difficulty 
they must have sleeping. She then 
added, “I know all tins and the 
thought of it makes me happy." 

The press is demanding u> know 
why the administration acts as if it 
were hiding something, and report- 
ers are rooting about wildly to find 
out what that something might be. 

And so. hearings. Once they get 
under way, somewhere amid the 
histrionics and the shenanigans, the 
stonewalling and the obfuscation, 
some truths should emerge about 
the widespread and corrosive rela- 
tionships between powerful govern- 
ment officials and powerful private 
interests. That is the essential prob- 
lem of Whitewater, and one of the 
essential problems of government. 

Representative Jim Leach, on 
Iowa Republican, is eloquent on this. 


Using tire savings-and-Ioan debacle 
as an IDustraiion, be said: “Alleged 
defenders of the little guy in Ameri- 
can politics found themselves ad- 
vancing the interests of a small num- 
ber of owners of finan cial institu- 
tions which were run as private piggy 
banks for insiders. The intertwining 
of greed and ambition turned demo- 
cratic values upside down." 

At the moment the interests of the 
Clintons and of the public conflict 
Bill and Hillary Clinton do not want 
to be embarrassed, or worse, by reve- 
lations about Whitewater. They say 
they have done nothing wrong, and 
that may be true. But Americans 
need to know that their government 
represents them, and not some cabal 
of big money interests and political 
insiders- Whitewater is about more 
than criminal wrongdoing. Jr is 
about whether Americans can trust 
the president and the first lady. 

If the Clintons come out of the 
bearings with minor bruises, they 
will be able to move ahead with 
renewed vigor, and the press and the 
Republicans will look foolish. If the 
Clintons do not come out of tins in 
good shape the crisis of confidence 
in government will be enormous. Ei- 
ther way, let the bearings begin. 

The New York Times. 


But it is more usual to underesti- 
mate the impact of culture and world 
history on international conflicts. In 
looking at this problem with Singa- 
pore, it is not incidental that this dry- 
state at the tip of the Malay Peninsu- 
la is essentially ruled and regulated 
by ethnic Chinese citizens who have 
not totally lost the Han emperors* 
disdain for non-Han cultures. 

The neighborly disdain of the Han 
for Mongols, Malays and Russians 
now extends further afield. Secretary 
of State Warren Christopher no 
doubt was viewed as one in a long 
Hoe of powerful but loathsome bar- 
barians come to Beijing to meddle in 
China’s affairs. Communist, post- 
Communist or whatever, cultural su- 
periority survives as a 
iron] the Middle . 
with the outside 
That reality is why much of the 
U.S. business community's criticism 
of the Clinton administration for 
pressing the Chinese on human rights 
is so misguided. Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Christopher are absolutely right 
when they insist that they are not 
trying to impose American standards 
of behavior on the Chinese. 

The reality is that the Chinese are 
arrogantly insisting that they do not 
have to observe even the bare mini- 
mums of international (not Ameri- 
can) standards of civilized behavior.. 
A Chinese social rebel acting 
chad Fay allegedly has wouk 
bfy not nave been caned in neymg, 
but shot through the bead, with his 
family receiving the bill for the bullet 
that killed him (a favorite gesture of 
the current regime). 

I have my problems with the now 
murin’ Clinton approach to China, as 
I out fined in a recent column (IHT. 
March 16). But it is unhelpful and 
dishonest for American business or 
anyone else to pretend that this con- 
flict is about American political or 
cultural imperialism. This conflict re- 
volves around thousands of years of 
institutionalized racism practiced by 
Chinese leaders, from the emperors 
to the chairman's commissars. 

The Washington Post 


as Mi- 


Someone 
Tell the 
Pentagon ! 

By Stephen S. Roeenfel^ 

■^■ASHINGTRON — The new 


Clinton Pen: 
to an old alarm — 


[onus reverting 
‘ are 


Meanwhile, in Japan's relationship 
with Korea at least some of the ghosts 
of history have been exorcised by the 
advent of new leaders. Japan's colo- 
nial contempt for Koreans has turned 
to concern about Korean industrial 
prowess. But c omm ercial rivalry is 
healthy enough and mutual interests 
are many. Both have global trading 
positions to be protected. And . some 
Japanese, rearing the combination of 
labor, capital and skill supposedly rep- 
resented by Greater China, see Korea 
as an aQy in preventing ethnic Chinese 
economic Awwmitj nn of Fast Aria 

Ultimately the United States re- 
mains the guarantor of peace on the 
Korean Peninsula. It may be so until 
after reunification. Seoul cannot take 
it for granted or let its chauvinistic 
attitudes undermine the relationship. 

But the United States also needs to 

recognize that the region is cow more 
stable because of tire better balance 
between the other powers. That is not 
to underestimate the dangers of arms 
races in East Asia and longer-term 
rivalries between a hegemonic China 
and Japan and the states bordering 
the South China Sea. 

But for now, multipolarity is help- 
ing the stability of the Korean Penin- 
sula, which explains why Seoul is so 
relaxed while headlines elsewhere 
suggest that it should be the most ■ 
tense city on the planet. 

International Herald Tribune. 


It is doing so in the absence of a 
showing that, in the classical military 
sense, the Russians are coming at alL 
While the American military groans 
of being a few billion underfunded, 
the Russian military is truly strait- 
ened. Its new budget of $22 bfllioo, 
less than half of what would keep it 

even with last year, is less than a tenth 

of the American level Its future is 
bleak beyond American imagining. 

A year ago, Les Aspm, then the US. 
defease duet was noting that Russia 
might go “ultranatioiunsik, hostile 
and authoritarian.’' But be drew no 
hard political conclusions from it. 
New Mr. Aspin’s successor, William 
Perry, las hooked cm to the undeni- 
ably souring Moscow political donate 
as an argument for the administra- 
tion's military purposes. 

In a speed] March 14, Mr. Peny 
said that Russia could yet emerge “as 
an authoritarian, militaris t^ imperial- 
istic nation, hostile to the WesL" He 
added, “In such a situation, we could 
indeed see a renewal of some new 
version of the old Cold War, Russia 
without the Warsaw Pact but still with 
a formidable nuclear arsenal.” 

On die premise that this prospect 
can be avoided, the Pentagon is push- 
ing a variety of cooperative security 
prog r am s — weapons dismantlement 
nonproliferation, safety, communica- 
tion — designed in the fust instance to 
reduce the nuclear threat The Perry 
signature is a heavier emphasis on a 
strategy of “hedges" against a worst- 
case outcome in Moscow. 

One American hedge is to slow the 
pace of strategic arms reductions un- 
der START-2 to the pace of Russian 
reductions, even while continuing 
unilateral reductions of less modern 
systems under START- 1. 

The “most important" hedge is the 
American defense program- Some 
spending items, concedes Mr. Perry, 
“cannot be justified by the current 
threats we see in the world today. 
And when I defend our budget a 
Congress, I am asked . . . how can 
we justify spending for threats that 
do not now exisL And the answer to 
that basically, is some military capa- 
bilities have such a long lead tune 
that we have to spend money on them 
now even though we don’t need them 
right away if we think there's some 
plausible possibility of needing them 
five or 10 years in the futures 
Research and development consti- 
tutes one such item. Another is main- 
tenance of “a minimum essential de- 
fense industrial infrastructure," 
particularly for nuclear weapons. 
Certain weapons are on the list — 
nuclear submarines. Trident missiles 
and tank improvements — to, again. 
keep the industrial base warm. 

R&D, an industrial base, produc- 
tion capabilities; The enrats win, 
one hopes, argue out the details. The 
rest of us are left to mull over the 
uigency of defense insurance when, 
as Mr. Perry acknowledges in regard 
to the submarines, “the current threat 
and our current replacement needs 
don’t justify building new subma- 
rines until the year 200O." 

A Russian military threat is being 
invoked rather arbitrarily. Is there not 
a more straightforward and contem- 


it Russia’s reformers are on the 
defensive is undisputed. The climate is 
indeed sour. Russian diplomacy is vis- 
ibly becoming more assertive. 

But there are brighter as wdl as 
darker colors on the Russian scene. 
No single outcome is ardnmed. Rus- 
sian foreign policy has its imperial 
aspect, but in the conspicuous in- 
stance of Yugoslavia it is proving 
responsive to Western concerns, and 
on the sensitive issue of Latvia it 
is shaping up, too. 

Mr. Peny does not address the cen- 
tral matter of how the Russian nnU- 
lary might manage to survive and re- 
yerse, in a form threatening American 
interests, the continuing decimation of 
its industrial base as well as of its 
uniformed forces. He makes a case for 
a vigorous and realistic American di^ 
plamacy, but not for greats’ American? 
military power with which to contend 
against a Russia again conducting “an 
antagonistic global rivalry.” 

In short, the United States may 
face an irregular pattern of Russian 

S^plomacy, but^signs are lacking, 
tbat it faces a drive by the Russian 
military to expand Russian influence 
beyond the gray areas of the “near 
abroad" — the non-Russian parts of 
the old Soviet Union. The United 
States needs a defense force suited to 
the real world — no less, no more. 

The Washington Post 


IN OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: An Imperial Bet 

BERLIN — At the last Parliamenta- 
ry dinner at Count Caprivi’s palace. 
His Majesty Depressed the conviction 
that the Russian Commercial Treaty 
would And a majority in the Reich- 
stag. This view Baron von Stumm, 
die German “Iron King," combated 
in the most decided manner. The Em- 
peror then colled out in his impulsive 
way, “Will you bet a dinnert" 
“Done!” And it was arranged that 
the loser should pay a dinner for the 
company. A few days later the treaty 
passed the Reichstag. The “Iron 
King" of course paid the bet and 
treated (he Emperor and his friends 
to a sumptuous meal. 

19X9: Qeaning Up Paris 

PARIS — - Owing to frequent com- 
plaints made by Parisians residing in 
the Montparnasse district, the police 
last night [March 20] started a dean- 
ing-up campaign and raided a num- 
ber of saloons, arresting many sus- 


pects. One place visited by the Paris 
police officials, who were assisted by 
American detectives, was the Cafidu 
Dome, in the boulevard Montpar- 
nasse, formerly a favorite resort of 
American art students. Here the au- 
tnonties scrutinized the papers of 
-00 persons, 1 50 of whom were for- 
eigners. Among the individuals ar- 
rested were 4 Russians. 

1944: Viciryhe Executed 

ALGIERS — [From our New York 
«tition:j Pierre Pucheu, onetime Vi- 
chy Minister of the Interior, was exe- 
cuted here at dawn today [March 20] 
fy a r,r j?g squad, in accordance with 
the verdict of a special military tribu- 
nal winch nine days ago found him 
gwlty of collusion with the enemy ifl 
sctvteg in the Vichy regime It was 
“ist execution by the French 
t-onunntee of National Liberation 
govern men t headed by General 
Cnaries de Gaulle, of a tnembe’ of 
the Vichy government and collabora- 
tionist wuh the Gomans. 






“■ ^ ryA 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, 


21, 1994 


Page 7 l 




Compaq and Microsoft. 

THE CONNECTION THAT’S MAKING 
"PLUG AND PLAY" A REALITY. 




J ust about everyone who's ever used a computer has 
experienced the same thought : Wouldn't it be great if 
setting up or upgrading your machine was as easy as 
turning it on ? The idea is called "Plug and Play". People 
have been talking about it for years. But now, an ongoing 
partnership between Compaq and Microsoft , working with 
other industry leaders, is actually making it happen. Plug 
and Play is the result of some very fresh thinking in both 
hardware and software - an accomplishment that tapped the 
combined engineering expertise of both companies. 
Together, Compaq computers and the next version of the 
Microsoft® Windows™ operating system (code-named 
Chicago) will deliver the long-promised benefits of true Plug 


and Play : easy setup, easy expansion and easy connection to 
peripherals. Which means no more configuration headaches. 
No more hidden switches, cryptic codes or mystery. Even 
today, Compaq is shipping computers that will take full 
advantage of Plug and Play technology as soon as the 
forthcoming version of Windows is available. So the 
Compaq &Windows combination will quickly become the 
standard for Plug and Play computing. A welcome 
reassurance for people who buy computers. 


COMPAQ. 

SHOWS THE WAY 



©1 994 Compaq Computer Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Compaq Registered U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Microsoft is a registered trademark of the Microsoft Corporation. Windows is a trademark of the Microsoft Corporation. 


§’&g.g a;s*a' h « «* *.&■< 










INTERNATIONAL 


WEEKLY INTERNATIONAL 


eseeiib 


Provided by Credit Suisse first 
Boston Limited, London, Tel: 
322 40 00. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. March 18 


Canadian Dollars 


135 

+a 

&11 

+99 

UO 

+76 

7JB 

+40 

645 

+39 

755 

+16 

647 

+65 

6J2 

+15 

7J1 

+36 

BUI 

+33 

14 

+C 

737 

+56 

BJJ7 

+55 

6-97 

+77 

7J1 

+» 

170 

+62 

171 

+61 

7Jt 

463 

649 

+45 

6J9 

+55 

158 

+42 

AM 

+51 

337 

+98 

742 

+7* 

7J8 

+86 

1H 

+71 

741 

+73 


Pnco YU T'Sf 


■ asj, 


Price YU Trc, 


3S I ECU Straights 



Hr» 


*J7 
62 9 +35 
-03* -6*7 
*74 +29 
(JO +3* 
670 +< 

(00 +15 

US 



+30 

+* e 

+2B Hi 
+33 Ei 

+ * B 

E 
El 


5ft 

94 

7 

M 

6 

01 

6ft 

98 

4ft 

90 

7 

95 

4ft 

97 

5% 

94 

5ft 

94 

5ft 

96 

4ft 

03 

4ft 

va 

6ft 

H 

6% 

01 

5% 

99 

<% 

97 

4ft 

03 

6 

02 

6% 

96 

5ft 

« 

4ft 

97 

6% 

01 

7 

96 

4ft 

90 


i 




Sales | 

Dtv YU 100s HUft Loo Ose On 5fcda 


Oft YU loas Hfch Law On due Stock] Uv YU 100s w Low dee Owe 


_ 979 9% 7% 9ft -2V, 
„ 2232 13V, lift 13'/* -l'A 

_ 147314% 13ft 14 -ft 

- 673 19ft 18% 19'A * V. 

20 IJ 111 15% 14ft IS 

_ 12181 UK 26 247.-1* 

.12a A 7324 71% 18% 21*4 *2Vi 

„ Ton 19ft 17% 18% — % 
_ 827 35% 34 34% — % 

- 6(28 40 38 38% -1 

„ 2773 1344 13 13% +% 

_ 43 9 ■% 8% -% 

M A 219321 II 20 *1% 

_ 2565 10% 9*4 10% -ft 
_ 5805 16'4 14 16 — % 

48t 1012308 23% 22 23 -% 

_ 723 11% 11% 11% 

-M .1 8034 44% 43% 43% — % 
1 £i ZB Trust 57 57% — % 

JO 2.9 18 28 26% 28 *-1% 

_ 2006 21% 20% 21% *1% 

- 715 4% 3% A 

Z 43232 24W & ££ 7*2 

- 571 S 4% 5 **A 

_ 159 TV- 2 2 — % 

JO 3-5 13139 8% 7 8% -1 

M A 11313% 12% 13% *% 
J6 3 91 13% 12% 13 — % 

zTBWY* WtV 

.11 IJ 4<fc6% 6% 6% 

13% 11% 12% -Vj 
4% 3% 4 +% 


_ 155 8% 7% 

1-8 4b6% 6% 

_ 51713% 11% .... 

_ 430 4 % 3% 4 + V 

- 42 4% 4% 4% + V 

jj/kmiK-i' 

- 491 12 11% 12 *V 

1.1 SS1S% 15 15% 7 9 

_ 2S 8% 8% 6% — * 
_ 1341 25% 34% 25% + 1 
_ 1157914% 17% 13% ♦» 

- 676 4% 4 4% -V 

_ 896 % % rVm -Vi 


- V'* 

- 407722% 21% 


4 4% -V 

% rVi* «-Vj 
21 % 21 % * _ 
21% 22% *1 


J8 4J 3191 12% 11% 11% — ’ 

Z233?5 21% »ft 7T% -V 

_ 5S7 17 16% 17 -V 

_ 46917% 16% 17% — « 

.16 A 203 26% 24% 36% -V. 

JO J 130302 34% 28% 2?%— 3*1 

- B01 2 1% 1«%| — V, 

- 155318% 16% 17 —1 

_ 1313 22V, 18 18% — 2 

_ 1681 13% 13% 13% — % 

_ 8921»/„ ]% 1% —Vi, 

_ 17580 7% 5% 7 *1% 

_ 2113 5% 4% 4>V b -ft, 

_ 8583 5% 4% 5¥i* .1%, 

- 2185 7% 6% 7 - _ 

_ 6249 10% 9% 10% _ 


_ 192 JH 3% 3Y» 


- 1494 16 

- 280 6 
>. 13177 9% 
A 18277 36 


16 

6 * Vi 

9% -ft 
35% +2% 
32 -H 


J4 A 6803 33V* 31 32 -ft 

- 311 26 25% 25% — % 

- 973 39|* 3V|* 3Vi* — % 

_ 538 8% 8% 8% -ft 

- 3096 10% 9% 10 -% 

_ 414 4% 3% 3% 

- 980 17% 14% 16% — % 

- 1» 18% 17% 18% *% 

- 1457 14% 13V4 13V. — % 

-10a .9 8707 12% 11 11%—% 

- 13693 16% 14% 14% — % 

377 4% }% 3% —ft 

- 3472 7% 7V. 7% — % 

_ 2442 2% 1% 11%, —ft, 

_ 3314 12% 10ft II — iVff 

- 185 9% 9 9 — % 

.12 IJ 1189 10'A 9V* 10% .% 

lJ9e 22 TOSW 57% »* ZIft 
■33*1.1 61 18% IB 18% *W 

- 3590 21% 21 21% .ft 

1JD 5J 99 22 2I'A 21% — % 

■10e J 181620% 19% 20% +% 

_ 18110% 9% low +W 

_ 10677 17% 14% 15ft — w 

-75540 34% 74% 32% *8 

■88 3J 2411 27% 25% 27 *1% 

- 1902 5% 5 5% .% 

J9 2J 48712ft 11*4 lift —ft 

. -1107318% 15ft 17 

.15 7 8420 % 19% 20% *% 

- 1722 Oft 7ft 7ft — ft 

- 34192 3*Vn 2 Oft 3% »<%, 
.. 2424 2ft lft 1ft — % 

- 16 10 10 10 —ft 

.. - 2«0 8% Bft 8ft .ft 

J2 17 2933 30ft 31 —I 

- 5164 10 9 9% -ft 

_ 7878 14ft 13 14 -ft 

M 2 A 111 16 15% 15% — % 

1» 68X223516% 15*6 15V, — % 
lJ*e 1031x1365 13ft 13ft 13% 
l--g« 66 >773 15 14 14ft —ft 

33* 2-2 x98S 15 14ft 14% —ft 

- 792 14 12*6 13% _ 

-60 2-3x1323 25ft 25 25ft -ft 
J4 1 A 606 15V* 14 15U -ft 

J69 j « it w -ii 

= was r* r* 

_ 1 166 TO 19% 19V. _ 

- 31 5ft 4ft 4% 

- 7386 23* 2% 2>%, -ft, 

- 1879 iV„ % -2 

- 1609 13ft 12ft 12ft .% 

- 285 4 3% 4 -ft 

- 2803 27ft 25 IS* —ft 

- 2400 1% 1% lift, 

_ 120 9u Hu ‘A* _ 

. - 120 4% 4ft 4ft _ 

3>7e 7 1383 14% 7% 10W -2% 

- 935 IV* lft, 1V» +V« 

6 4 3ft 4 _ 

_ 7861 9*4 8% 9V4 •% 

- 12937 34V. 33% 34% -% 

_ 3561 16ft 14% Ifift M% 
_ 130 4 5 5 —1 

. _ 752 4V, 3ft 3ft — % 

08+ 3.1 13528ft 27ft 28ft -ft 

-54 3J 755 17ft 16% 16% —ft 

JO 4 A x!94 14ft 13% 13ft - 

. - Beoei'Vu 1ft 1% -% 
J AO 69 502 24ft 23ft 23ft - 

1-06 10.9 141 10% 9ft 9ft — % 

-54 8.0 574 6ft 6% 6ft -ft 

7S U 203 8ft 8% 8% - ft 

-Old _ 6449 78ft 71% 73 —4ft 

_ — 451 3ft 3% 3ft _ 

JO 2.9 144 IBft 17 17 —ft 

■68 7J 3386 26ft 23% 25ft * 1% 

_ 3005 4% 4ft 4ft — % 

- 1229 17ft 16ft 16% _ 

- 75 29% 28ft 78ft— lft 

- 1744 3ft TV* 3% -lft 
J4 1J 2676 15% 14% 15% — % 

_ 392 4 3ft 3ft —ft 

43o J 183 I) 10ft II - 

- 1813 4ft 3% «ft -ft 

■2D IJ 135311ft 10% lift .% 
.96 3J 39 31% 29 29% - I 

- 1078 19% 18% 18% „ 

JO 1.7 14182 30ft 28% 29 —ft 

- 8623 14% 12 14 -ft 

_ 609 lft IW. I'Vjj —ft, 

.12 .9 233 13% 13 13 

_ 18192 Vd ft, ft, _ 
_ 74171 lift, 1’ft, l"/ n — Vs 

2.16 64 2078 26ft 25% 25% —ft 

- 63 5 S S _ 

_ 3328 21 19% 70ft -% 

_ 5284 17 15ft 16ft —ft 

- 191219ft IB IBft— 1 

_ 233818ft 16 17% -1 

2J0 4J 218 53 52 52 —1 

-. 7102 10ft 8ft 9% - ft 

1*07 16% 14% 16% -1% 

_ 91 7V* I'/. 1ft —V* 

- 34365 79ft 26% 28% ■ 1% 

-22 II *960 7 6% 7 ■ % 

_ 298 IS 14 14 — % 

_ 2784 18 17 17 —1% 

44713% 11% 12 - ft 

- 1268 19% 18% 19 V* - ft 

33 iA 3954 6% 5% 5% —ft 

.« 1.9 1498 4ft 4 4 V. ■ ft 

- 4132 39 31'* 37% ■ 6ft 

._ 22032316 21V. 21ft— IV* 

. 5963 13% 12% 13ft - W 

_ 2604 4"/ n 6 6% — %. 

_ 53W lft 1ft 1% -v* 

_ 210 16% 15ft 15*i—l 


11% 
15% 
7ft 8% 
13% 13% 
3 3% 

7V U 2%. 
V* V* 
10 % 10 % 
3% 

10 % 

1 % 


/ BY* 

a a 


1-08 3J 3288 
_ 4584 
4U 1J 127 
.158 IJ 10142 
— II 
90 

JO a 2J x*7 
.140 t A 312 
M A 13121 
_ 1461 
_ 2721 
_ 29 

-1B037 

- 4512 
_ 1982 
_ 459 

- 3000 

.. 380 

, - 390 

-76 3J 403 
1.12 3J 80 
^ 841 
. — 3176 

J2 1-4 7300 

- 1238 
_ 1302 

- 181 
- 220 
_ 2193 

- 1984 

J6 J 3184 
.83 3 595 

JO 1-3 5675 

— 43 
-.13782 

— 47 
■00 3.1 35*8 

&4 1056 
-24 IJ 59 
32 3 3 

-33 r | j 76 
OBb 3A /J 
20 33 73 

2998 

.96 6.1 836 

Me3A 30 
Ai 2A 15503 
M IJ 29 
-I6o .9 60S 
J* 1.8 811 
,10b 1 A *7 
_ x76 

- x63 
JO A 800 
40 U <14 
-10e A 70S 
60 17 ID 
J2 I A 1034 

_ 1110 

_ 548 

AO 69 1150 


_ 141815 
_ 1261 15 
J8» 3.1 499 37W 

|JB 3J 

_ BO 18% 

_ 11236% 

_ 399 3% 

_ 22812% 

JO 2J 322 

- 27 2ft 

- Ml 11% 

40 U 71 18% 

_ TO 91%. 

_ 6333 4% 

_ 2744 10U 
_ 116 8% 

_ 228 2 
■84b 2J 68 33% 
J6b2J 522 11 
38 3A 172 27ft 
_ 1«) 7% 

„ 295 2% 

J»o A 21113% 

_ 67321 

- 79 9% 

_ 208 29% 

_ 178 13% 

- 579 7% 

-. 159614 
_ 73812 

AI 1 1 S3 6876 9% 7% 
_ 419 8% 7% 
_ 6300 9% 8 
JO a 5-0x4980 31% 29% 
_ 564 1%. Dtj, 
JO I A 332 15% 14ft 
_ 4704 9% 8% 

- 1850 6% 5% 
-10168 13% 11% 

- 2556 5% 4% 
J2 3J 436 15% 15 

_ 1730 8% 7% 
44b 2J 53117 16% 

-38922 23 13% 

- 6596 23 20% 

40 47 89 8% 7% 

.98 SJ 87 37% 35 

_ 27 9% 9% 

2S»10a 246 2% 2% 

- 2080 2% 2% 

_ 195 32% 3TW 

- 2337 Bft 7% 

- 474 4*Vn 4% 

- £283 3% 3 

_ 167 8 7% 

- 20617 16% 

- 1290 16 14% 

_ 2*30 2B% 

_ 6078 30ft 27% 

- 1008 4ft 3 

_ 77 lft I 

_ 496 2% 2ft 
_ 209 16 14% 

- TSE 14 12% 

J6e 3 20 81% 80% 

-. 169 4% 3% 

JO — 201 9% 9% 

- 107 6 5% 

-75 5 

-. 1228 3% 2ft 

- 1939 3”% 3% 

- 340 IV* lft 

- 72 23 22% 

_ 585 V/a *%, 

•68 12 8621 20ft 

.95 9JI 1621% 21% 
„ - 3*3 12% 12% 

40*14 9539% 38% 

JB« 2.0 187 10 9 

5017% 16% 
36 1.9X3161 19% 18% 
JB« 7 22 30% 30 

-12 J 7400 SDV. 48% 
_ 350 2% 2ft 

- 11)0 7% 7V< 

- 3387 11% 11 

- 9949 4% 4ft 

- 55012% lift 

- I7ZI 6ft 5ft 

•78+ 27 574 29*4 Bft 

70b 1.6 7512% 12 

-2161717% 15% 
~ 1505 2V. 1 


♦ % 
5 —ft 
24 

4% —46 

14 -% 

15% ♦»% 
»ft _ 
®% ♦% 
44 *4 

14ft *1% 
SVi — % 

15 +1 
16 % -ft 
12% +% 
8% -ft 
32% ♦% 
20% +3 
24V* —ft 
17ft —ft 

S?-% 

33% — % 
5ft 

26% +1% 
5% 


14% —ft 
14% -ft 
31% _ 

8% *% 
35ft +% 
17% —ft 
35ft — lft 
3ft - 
12% —ft 
22 
2% 

11% *■% 
18ft +% 

^r-32 

5% —4ft 
Bft 

1% — % 
33ft ♦% 
10ft *% 
26ft— 1 
7% _ 

fihdk 

W +m 

f% 

29% ♦% 
13% *■% 

Sfelfc 
12 ♦% 
9 +1% 

8% -ft 
9% +ft 
30 +ft 

1^^ 
9ft .ft 
6 .ft 
12ft .ft 
S’* -ft 
15ft ♦% 
Bft .ft 
16ft - 
22% *8% 
22ft -1% 
8% ♦% 
37% *3 
9% ♦% 
2ft —ft 
2ft *ft 
32 *% 

7% —ft 
fft) ♦•Vta 
3ft .% 
7% —ft 
16ft -ft 
TS —ft 
X .2ft 
29ft *1% 
3ft -% 
1% -% 
2V* +%* 
14% — 1 ft 
13 — 1 
80% —ft 

4 .% 

9ft .ft 
6 —ft 
5 —lft 
3ft —ft 
3% -V a 

? = 

21% -% 
12ft —ft 
38ft —ft 
9*6 —ft 
16% —ft 
19 .ft 
MW .% 
50 *1% 

2% 

7ft —ft 
11% * Vi 
41V* .V* 
lift 
6ft 

29ft -ft 
12% - 
17% .1% 
2% — % 


.12 3JX4366 

JS 3J KSOl 
AO 2A Xl 52 
-40 30 59 

AA SO * *13 
AA 5.9 122 

_ 267 

- 248 

.10 2J 623 
J 15 14 

_ 4620 

= € 

jOd 20 4859 

JO 5 43B 

Z 94 
-09 7 26744 

J0o37 a 
_ 219 
_ 4019 
J8 2J 4989 

- 346 
_ 1324 

- 45007 

- 1220 
_ 5720 

- 6979 

- 1254 
_ 951 

M 25*' 

- 4__ 

- 509 

42 u a 

OA A 1143 
-18892 


ft* 


1167 
_ ISO 
1J8 2Jxl577 57V* 

- 1391 
.17 A 7148 

_ 306 
AS 2J3 1 24% 

.900 77 

- 245413% 


mi 


13V. _ 

'W z 

13% _ 

a :& 

13 +% 

16% _ 

4% :# 
47% .% 

®W-2W 
4% ft 

£ft=3 

4% .% 


a — % 

?ta +% 

i -S 

8 % .% 

1 6 1V, -% 


70ft 

10ft _ 
8% 11% -ft 
1 % 1 % — % 
12ft 13% +% 
56% 59 ♦% 

5ft 4 — i ft 

70ft 71 V.— 6ft 
17% 18% -*4 
3ft W* +V* 
% % - 
SV, 5ft — % 
15% 18% — 1% 
18ft 19ft 
8% 

MW *1% 
6ft *-% 
56% *% 
8ft —ft 
29% 30ft -ft 
5% 5% — % 
24% 24ft _ 
% 11% 

13 13ft 

6% 7ft 


1 77% 79 
26 26% 
5% 5% 
13% 14 
S 29 
30 30 ft 

24% 24ft 
8 8 
10ft 10% 
7 7% 

27 27ft. 

5ft 5% 
13 V. 13% 
7ft Bft 
3% 4 
3ft 3ft 
12 
2S% 
3Vi 
27% 
□Vb 
13 
a 

15% 




n% n% — % 

n% 11%— 1% 


5587 ISft 
18017% 17ft 
x799 10% 10ft 
16% 14ft 








_ 19X 7W 7ft 

- 85 3ft 7ft 

_ 328 15ft 14% 

-70 1 4J 2558 15% 14% 

- 357 6ft 6 

_ 390 4 3% 

- 175 A 3% 

- 599 4% 3ft 

- 1612 H 26% 

- 661 17% 16% 

- 126411ft II 
-11518 5% 5 

2J5 LO 307 26ft 27 Vi 

- 883 4ft 3VV 
I - 189727ft 24 Vi 

-5M3S 58 54% 

- 1352 25% 24% 

- 2124 19% 17ft 
_ 182 4ft 3*6 
_ 585 5 4ft 

- 1899 2% 2 

- 544 14% 13ft 

_ 11 19ft ISft 

_ 71 7% 7% 

- 200 7ft 6% 

- 102912% 12ft 

_ 512 9 8% 

- 431«31 29% 

J2I J 2393 44% 43ft 

- 824 5% 5% 
.13 J 434 86% S3 

_ 797 3% 3V|* 
_ 99 4% 3% 

_ 65513 lift 

_ 11a 2% 2ft 

- 2186 9% 8ft 

- 33011% 10ft 

_ 230 26% 24 

- 644 7% 7% 

- 3S3 4 3% 

_ 79 4 5% 

- 149416ft ISft 

- 10 2ft 2«h 

- 1100 lift 9% 
_ 283 VIA* 1% 

- 2516 9% Bft 

- 119 9% 8% 

- 675 5ft 6ft 
37 3J 991 24ft 23'A 

_ 746 18% 17% 

- 9850 9% Bft 


_ 207 9 BW 
_ 6455 17% 15 

- 2392 31 29% 

a 2.9 281 6H 6ft 

_ 1209 19ft IB 
JOalJ 1935 » 

- 949 Bft Bft 
_ 1264 16ft 14% 

- 438 14 13ft 

JO 22 1280 36 33% 

AA U 749 22ft 22 

-48814 27% 25ft 

- 7*9 22 20 

_ 3B0 4 3% 

.. 1574 19% 17ft 

OSa J 3533 17ft 16ft 
.10 U 29 19ft 19 
.16 IJ 22S4 1W4 15 

- 2850 44ft 43ft 
00 3ft 774 Bft 27 
.100 - 22901*%, 1% 

- 17053 17 14% 

- 9493 3ft 3ft 

- S56 12 10% 

- 229 12% 11% 

- 2SJ 7ft 6ft 

- TTo 2% 2% 

- 2813 19 17ft 

- 2173 60ft 57% 

- 984 5% S 
_ 2767 3% 3% 

72 13 3614 23% 20% 
_ S3 7 6 

- 2601 19ft 18ft 
_ 3190 16 V) 13% 

- 1203 14% 11% 

- 1105 18 16ft 

-12376 17ft 13% 
_ 2 %, ft, 

- 12 ft Vd 

_ 896 lft, lft 

_ 5584 1W„ lft 

- 1649 3% 2ft 
_ 1417 7ft 6% 

- 1517 36 34% 

_ 159618% 17 
„ 407 17ft 15ft 

20 2J3 118510% 9% 
TO J 613331% X 
10 5J 26 aft 19% 
0 IS *74 14*6 13 
_ 213*21 20 

IB 4J 679 14% I* 


3ft 
15ft 
Jft .4% 
8% 7% 
20% 3ft 
3ft 
1W 
7% 
1% 
2ft 
2% 
3% 
% 34% 
% aft 
4ft 


% 

% 

ft 

% 
46 *2 

aw —% 
20 —■* 
9% +% 

Z7ft _ 
9*6 .% 

18% .% 
3ft —ft 
9ft — ft 
15% — W 
15 —1% 
*8 —ft 
10 — % 
Jlft .ft 
14ft —ft 
lift +ft 
7ft l-W 
lft -ft 
2% —ft 
I Oft .1% 

10% —ft 

& ft 
18% +1% 
9 -ft 
U *4Vi 


SUes 

Ofv YU lOQsHW) Low Ose 0)08 


1A 3J 726 
1 JO X6 6039 
JObZJ 10 
J4 2J152B0 
J4 3J 981 
2JS 8J3 52 

JO 7J X25 
_ 2181 
- 907 

J8 2J x28 
710 14 X6M 
-49 f 3.9 461 
JO 3J 1671 
1.75 5J X2B 
it 19 45 

1.00 3.9 x5873 
1J1 SJ XJ53 


.17« 2.1 

22H0 

JO 2J 

no 

JO 2J 

M 

SI 2.1 

1715 

J8 73 

1M 

J7e2 J 

87 

JO AJ) 

77 

1JD8 2J 

194 

44 e IJ 

x!57 

J2 3J 

S59 

JO 27 

1461 

■54 IJ 

90 

JO 2J 

761 

J8 3J 
JO IJ 

•B 

j07e 7 
t.lB 4J 

30+ 

JO 73 
SI 29 

141 

291 

JO IJ 
32 22 

x56 

53 

1-00 3 J 
-68b 3J 
48 26 



15ft 
35ft 
24% 

j» 

41ft— lft 

3 % *Vx 

36ft -1ft 
17 —ft 

2 AX 
^:S 


12% -ft 
22% — % 

lift -% 
» =8 
5ft Tft 

29 *1 

25% — % 


1% + s 

s&As 

24% 24ft— -lft 


23 -lft 

21 *ft 
19% -** 
7% -ft 
38% -ft 
12ft -ft 
9% —ft 

13 *l“ 

2ft -ft 
6ft -ft 
21ft -lft 
4% - 

6% -ft 
a -ift 
7'A +% 
12% -ft 
8% -ft 

24 -ft 
30% —ft 

22 —1% 

Jl - 
16% -W 
7% .ft 
lE'A ~ 
15% - 

10 % — 1 
26% -ft 
3ft ■•% 
8% —% 
lift -% 

9 -fi 

tr:s 

7 +v* 

6 -** 
10ft -1% 
25% - 

12% - 
12% —ft 
5ft -ft 
2% -% 
3% -% 
2ft -ft 
26% -ft 
8% •% 
13 to ♦}* 
4% — % 
Vb 

W] - 
2% .4% 
Uft +% 
8ft -ft 

SI **1% 

rva 

2ft +ft 
3ft -% 
t% —ft 
7ft -2ft 
1% -ft 

Oft -6ft 
lft— 1 
6% *% 
lft *«! 

2 -ft 
5 -ft 
2ft -ft 


39 37ft 
3 3 

13ft 12% 
19 18 

34 33 

29% 28 
14% 13% 
18ft 13% 
5% 4W 

p a. 

20ft 

74% 

31 
23 
3 


















































































J 




. : i ]» 

r Jft- ft 
3-. ■>; 'fc; 

■ i r t \ rt 


«• . > 

W * 
c' »> 


** 


SjWc'v-' 


it*; 


tAiBn&'ie 

International Herald Tribune ; Monday , March 21, 1994 


'k i? 
C ‘i 

'ic. si 


Page 9 


' v*. 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


WstH 




vJ.S. Bate Rise Prospects 
Keep Investors on Hold 


* • v. :> : • ; 

r & § • 

i S siC 3® . 


1 ££\E’ 


S*t: 


"■« ■ ■£ ; 
ifcSi 


Tuesday and another quarter- thl i 
point within a few weeks, when Only paper 
data to be released in early April • 

confirm chat the us. r^ovSy attracting interest IS 

• v floating-rate notes. 

The bigger question is how ° 

financial markets will react. No 








— nm 1 WOVU HW 

increase at all could undermine the outlook for inflation in the 
Umted States and abroad, said John Lipsky, of Salomon Brothers 
m New York. But a half -point increase coupled with a rise in the 
discount rate could unsettle markets and be interpreted as an 
admission that the Fed’s pre-emptive strategy is in trouble, analysts 
at J. P. Morgan said. 

How much of the next increase is already priced into the market 
re mains to be seen, although analysts said they thought a quarter- 
point rise was fully discounted and unlikely to create a sell-off in 
ijhe bond markets. 

But investors nursing large losses are in no mood to try to guess 
and are on the sidelines. The only paper attracting interest is 
floating-rale notes that offer ma ximum protection against rising 
rates because coupons are reset at regular three- or six-month 
intervals. 

New Zealand’s sale of SI billion in five-year floating-rate notes 
last week drew enthusiastic response. The yield was set % point, or 
12.5 basis points, below the three-month London interbank offered 
rate, but because the paper was offered at a modest discount, the 
return to investors is eight basis points below LIBOR — or slightly 
more than could be earned depositing money at a bank. 

Petroleds Mcxicanos, the Mexican state-owned ofl company 
known as Pemex, raised $400 million equally divided between a 
c l assic five-year floating-rate note with interest set at 85 basis 
points over three-month LIBOR and a rive-year structured loan. 
The loan, known as a corridor floater, pays interest of 205 basis 
points over three-month LIBOR, as long as the interbank rate 
remains within a fixed parameter. If LIBOR moves beyond the 


established range, no interest is paid. 

Such corridor floaters axe not unique. What is new in this 


See BONDS, Page Z1 




■; 1- 


» ■t-r- 

-1 *-* • 



THE THIS INDEX 


Wovfdfmfox 

International Herald Tribune 11U 
World Stock Index, composed 
of 280 internationally investable 
stocks from 25 countries, 
c emptied by Bloomberg 
Business News. 


WeBkendng March 18, 
daily dosings. 
Jan. 1992 = 100. 


134 


Aafa/Pacfflc 

/'v '=■ 



MB 



Industrial SeetorsAVeakend dose 

an KM WI1M % 


antm a me* 


J rt: 


Energy 112.B1 111^6 rf.85 CapBal Goods 114.55 114.18 4032 
UUfities 126.71 125.29 +1.13 Raw Material* 123.11121.82 +15^ 


Rnance 116.4411654 40.09 Consumer Good* 995810055 -Q£7_ 
Services 119.77 121-52 -1.44 Msceltaneous 1Z75812&31 -026 


nis r, gijri- ii e doBur vbIubs of slocks kv Tokyo, Mo* Yoifc, London, and 
SSSikSBi. S*H, IrtMrtwd end VwairtiL For 

tSmailaitDm»mazaban. otteiwtSBmetBn top stacks aw tracked 


©KenwBona1HaraklTiflM» 


CURRENCY RATES 


Cross Rates 


March 18 


: w : -»- a 


„ r i+*we 
* +v •• * 


4 

r r- 


_ CP mm nn kF. M. V* Q PWWo . 

s * f£l ..m. us> ua uu 1 uns tws* 

w ® 2 5 * Bias Kffl OW U M* 

JU» SUB a* ua “J. ™ osa* urn uw»* uu* 

u® SZ Jnur bus 11 * 1 S» urn awi 

fl im -r 5S i 5* nS um wn 

wa »» »» **{ JZ mn «» u*» 10,3 ,auB 

moo vnf» *** “= 1477J, use JUJ M*15 MMI 1»» Vat 

new Yon m — 14£" _ ’Sfl. amis wk um s®’ «• "f 

TAro . WSIO isus Ofl o»* os 1XK* — ««• 

SSI ■* ““ S S S- S ««■ — ™- « 

Zbrtcfi uw iw w* MWI uru mm* ism as 

,ECU lW4 !2 13 S So *« « am »« iw «« 

15DR um , Jz York, Tcrvnfa^Zwidj.nxhwJicif^cf^^ 

CteAaa M dollar; •: Units of 100: *0: auaM: MA. not 

a: To bur one pound; b: to our 

B YOltabJe . 


(*;• " ■' 1 


* «i.' " 

i 

« *r; s 


Ottw Dollflr VrfuA* ^ per* Corr wcr Pw* 

fm, mru pert CWMU tiliiT arnt U1 I, Air. rootf Utt 

^ SS S SSrESi VS V52 

as ss sgs Ear a ga. s 

— ufcrww partoKMla 174W Twklteum 

irfriic °fS b™. mwT 172406 UAEfflrtoni liO 

SSSS 3J«95 VWW.WM.I1UB 

MotaY-rkW. 171« »» 


ajkweyuoo van 
CaKbkontM »4l 
Oaaisb Krone UPS 
Eavoi.POwM 3JB7 
FtamorKM S3M1 


• in tf 1 
* — e 1 -* “ 

. .4* 2 


Forward Rato* ^ unw 

Conner CmwOon 

Dewidienmrk 
SriBMK 


* . _1*. 

S ’ o. v *•'* 

JL>* 


a t dor *Wr JMw 

UM UH «»7 

_ ^ IS as 2SS- “ “ ™ 

Ajwhianc 143*8 M 3 * 9 14 ^ „ i ;ll .^ ^^ i-flawC nM weWaMiwriann 

Seems: /MlS AWc T»vo W*W>; Sural Bank of Canada 

(Milan); Aoeace from OuSen anfAP- 

fTamm: IMF ISORI- ott * r ** 


* ■ «■ ... 
•T'**- 5 " . ,-r* 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

P i£*LT”'ri nVeSl0t l ^ hun 7 10 return to bond 
markets. The month-long rout continues to drive up long- 
term yields, which now stand between a half to 1.3 percent- 
■ . *8® P?fP B than at the start of the year and show no 

signs of stabilizing. This week promises to be an especially nervous 

° ne ^ ause F^eral Reserve Board is expected to raise short- 
term rates on Tuesday. 


The size of the increase is moot. Most analysts expect a quarter- 

mrtt inmw whirl, ur* *• * ' . 7 , j* _ _ 

vermght funds to 3 J 


point increase, which would Hft the cost of bvfamjcuL u> jj 
percra^ but there is heavy speculation that the next increase could 
be a half -point. At J. P. Morgan & Co. and Salomon Brothers Inc., 
the betting is 25 basis points on 


U.S. Mutual Fund Risks Get Riskier 


By Brett D. Fromson 

Washington Pest Service 

NEW YORK — The great mutual fund 
boom of the 1990s has transformed the U.S. 
financial system, producing economic and 
political consequences as unpredictable as 
they are powerful, financial analysts said. 

Mutual funds have emerged not only as 
drivers of the securities markets, but aim as 
aggressive competitors of commends! banks, 
the traditional repositories of household 
wealth and suppliers of capital to business. 

Many small investors have shifted their 
money from hanks into mutual funds because 
of low interest rates that have reduced the 
annual returns mi savings accounts to less 
than 3 percent. 

The ramifications of mutual fund mania 
worry David D. Hale, chief economist at 


Kemper Corp., an insurance and mutual fund 
company based in Chicago. ’This is a great 
experiment,” Mr. Hale said “We have never 
had a financial system like this before. We 
don’t know what it win mean." 


Henry Kaufman, the economist, said [he 

Inft of indivic 


shift of individual investors into mutual 
funds raises a number of provocative ques- 
tions about financial regulatory policy and 
the future stability of the financial markets. 

“The growth of mutual funds entails great- 
er financial risks and eventually greater eco- 
nomic risks.” Mr. Kaufman said 
In addition, Mr. Kaufman and Mr. Hale 
said the proliferation of mutual funds was 
politically significant. 

“American politicians have not yet fully 
grasped the significance of this development 
because the financial markets have been in a 


steady bull market since the end of the Gulf 
War three years ago.” Mr. Hale said “But by 
the time of the next presidential election, the 
performance of the bond and stock markets 
could become more important political vari- 
ables than at any other time in American 
history.” 

While a transfer of investments from feder- 
ally insured bank deposits to uninsured mu- 


tual funds has been taking place over the past 
ace of change has quick- 


two decades, the pace ^ _ 

ened dramatically in recent years. 

Mutual funds now control about S2 tril- 
lion, equal to about 85 percent of bank depos- 
its. In the early 1980s. funds had only 10 
percent as much as banks. 


According to fund industry studies, about 
household 


28 percent of U.S. households own mutual 

See MUTUAL, Page 11 


Schwab Makes It Easy to Get In — And Out 


By Leslie Wayne 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — Charles 
Schwab is at it again. 

In the last 18 months, Mr. 
Schwab, the discount broker who 
brought low prices to Wall Street, 
has set on a new target; mutual 
funds. His weapon of dunce is 
One Source — a financial Wal- 
Mart that enables investors to 
trade funds as easily as stocks. 

With one phone call, investors 
can bypass big fund companies 
like Fidelity Investment Co. and 
Merrill Lynch & Co. and buy 
□early 250 no-load funds from 
Charles Schwab Corp. Not only 


is this more convenient than the 
often chaotic way that funds are 
sold, it can be cheaper, too. 

For the first time, funds are 
being asked to pick up fees once 
borne by the customer, a real de- 
parture in industry pricing. Of 
course, the titans of finance are 
not taking it lightly. 

Take Fidelity. The $300 billion 


giant has publicly played down 
ab’s effort: “l don’t see 


Mr. Schwat 
Schwab as a big player in this 
business,” said Roger Servison, a 
Fidelity managing director. 

But, in a move that startled 
many in the industry. Fidelity be- 
gan last July to offer a One 


Source clone. "Schwab forced Fi- 
delity’s hand,” said W. Gordon 
Snyder, an executive vice presi- 
dent at Twentieth Century Inves- 
tors Inc,, a fund company that 
sells through Mr. Schwab. “And 
lhat’5 not trivial." 

What Mr. Schwab has Started 
is nothing less than a revolution 
in the way that mutual funds are 
priced and sold It has long been 


possible to go to a broker and buy 
funds from diff< 


different famili es, 
companies that offer funds for 
every investment need and strate- 
gy- 

But those funds usually have a 
heavy load, or commission, and 


the customer pays a broker's fee 
on top of that. Or a consumer 
could avoid brokers and their fees 
by buying cheaper no-load funds 
directly from any number of fam- 
ilies. But trying to buy from mare 
than one fund family requires ef- 
fort 

With One Source, Mr. Schwab 
combines the best of the two ap- 
proaches: a broad array of no-load 
funds sold in one place and with 
no fees. A blizzard of paperwork is 
replaced with one statement The 
ease of the program enables inves- 
tors to switch as readily from one 


See FUNDS, Page 11 


Japan’s Advance 
On EU Car Quota 
Reflects Politics 


By Stephen Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

TOKYO — The agreement over 
the weekend to enlarge this year’s 
quota for Japanese car exports to 
(he EU by a slight margin will have 
more political than markeL signifi- 
cance, analysts suggest because the 
strong yen will prevent Japanese 
makers from filling the quota. 

Negotiators from Brussels and 
Tokyo agreed Saturday to raise the 
ceiling for Japanese auto exports 
by 0.4 percent, to 984,000 units, 
the increase; the first in three 
years, was based on a common 
forecast that sales of cars and light 
commercial vehicles in Europe 
would grow by 2 percent in 1994, to 
just under 12 million units. 

Few analysts said they believed 
that Japanese car producers would 
be able to fill the quota, given the 
strong yen and sluggish d eman d in 
Europe. The grim outlook, com- 
bined with the problems faced by 
Japanese negotiators because of 
UB. demands that Japanese car- 
makers boost procurement of for- 
eign autos and components, helped 
to make this year's negotiations rel- 
atively painless. 

“Market a 


ue to expand but not as they ex- 
pected.” Mr. Boardman said, add- 
ing that makers had hoped to 
advance into the high end of the 
market by exporting luxury models 
from Japan. “They will probably 
remain in the low end and sacrifice 
profits to keep market share.” 

i i. u:..*... ..... i 


Japan’s biggest automaker, 
rCoipv 


Toyota Motor Corp., which makes 
a mid-sized in En gland , 

plans to boost production there to 
100,000 units m 1994, compared 
with 37300 last year. Honda Motor 
Co. expects to build 53,800 Ac- 


cords at its British plant this year, 
" 32,000 in 1993. Nis- 


impared with 32 
in Motor I 


COE . 

san Motor Corp. also manufactures 

in FnglanH 

Mazda Motor Corp., which has 
yet to make plans to set up a Euro- 
pean plant, is the most vulnerable 
of Japan's major automakers. It 


of Japans major automakers. It 
will likely seek relief by asking the 
Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry for an expanded ex- 
port allocation. 

“The ceiling will ultimately be 
sidestepped through local produc- 
tion,” Mr. Boardman said. 

:Ja 


anesc 


Dollar Optimists Hang Hopes on Rates 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Optimists, being what 
they are, refuse to be dismayed by 
the dollar’s lackluster performance 
against other currenaes recently, 
while the pessimists are out in force 
savirut worse is yet to come. 

le the optimists’ camp has 


obviously been diminished, hard- 
liners are insistent that better days 
in the form of a strong dollar are 
just around the comer as UB. in- 
terest rates continue rising — per- 
haps as soon as next week — and 
Gorman rates slowly edge lower. 

In their view, the dollar’s recent 
retreat 1.6750 Deutsche marks was 


Frankfurt Notebook 


A Prime Suspect 
For Securities Cop 


The decision is not yet final, but well-sourced rumors in Frankfurt 
have it that Georg ^ Wittig, a veteran federal Finance Ministry official 
wise to the ways of the country’s financial markets, is to be named 
head of Germany's new securities watchdog agency. 

Mr. Wittig has been Germany’s repres e n tative to the International 


is Finance Minister Theo WaigeTs personal favorite for the post, 
Bonn sources confirmed. 

The new agency is Germany’s answer to international calls for 
greater professionalism in its financial markets, which have been 
rocked by a series of scandals involving insider trading, front- 
running mid tax evasion and retain an air of Wild West lawlessness 
that frightens many small investors. 

In a show of enlightened self-interest, German banks are herald- 
ing Mr. Wi trig’s arrival as a sign to international investors that the 
country’s top stocks cop will be independent of their influence. 


What About That Billion Marks for the East? 


The banks are less agreeable when it conies to other kinds of 
scrutiny. At an annual meeting last week, open hostility hung 
between officials of the banking industry and of the government over 
ongoing criticism of hanks’ commitment to invest 1 billion Deutsche 
marks ($591 milli on) in private East Gorman industry. 

“We want to make a contribution and we will keep our word,” said 
Eberhard Martini, president of the Federation of German Banks. 
But so far, private banks, which have profited more than any other 
TTigritnrinns from German unification and which were to have pul up 
400 milli on DM as pari of the promised Bankenmilliarde, have yet to 
buy a single East German company. 

Friedrich Bohl an aide to Chancellor Helmut Kohl, last week gave 
hanks a mid-April deadline to make concrete progress and said 
attempts to count residential real estate investments toward the 
promised hiTHon were inadequate. Bonn’s annoyance is underlined 
by studies showing banks place hurdles significantly higher for 
woukl-be East German borrowers than for comparable West Ger- 
man companies, fomks say risks in the region are naturally greater. 


Gallup Warns on Black Marks 


Gallup, the public opinion and consumer research organization, 
has a weighty message for German manufacturers: price and perfor- 
mance are irrelevant if customers give you bad marks for service. 

Announcing the organization's arrival in Germany, Richard Burk- 
holder Jr„ director of Gallup's worldwide operations, said quality of 
service was becoming a distinguishing factor in inter n a tion al compe- 
tition. “Germans have had reason to be smug about the technical 
quality of tbrir work, but they’ve also had reason to be concerned 
about their quality of service,” he said. 

Gallup studies m the United States have found that it is five times 
more expensive to win a new customer than keep an existing one and 
that every dissatisfied customer shares his dissatisfaction with at 
least nine otters. 


— as the name applies — to the service sector, including German 
banks. Hans Pokoray, head of Gallup’s German operations, mid 
local banks are “running scared” in the face of growing competition 
from U.S. and British bank subsidiaries that are wooing customers 
with lower fees, interest-bearing revolving accounts and new services 
like telephone banking. 


Whose Face WiflMaik the Enro-Bfll? 


The future single currency of the European Union is still a decade 
from reality, but people are already beginning to wonder what it will 
look Hkc. Maybe some bills could cany the face of President Francois 
Mitterrand or Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the union's two anchors? 

Andreas von Schoeler, the lord mayor of Frankfurt, has anotho 1 , 
neutral suggestion. At a recent birthday celebration for the Roth- 
schilds, whose financial empire began in Frankfurt, Mr. von 
Schoeler proposed putting Mayer Amsehd, the dynasty’s founder, 
on tiie first curo-biD. “This family has charactcnzed the^nnanoai 
world in the past and will continue to do so in the future," he said. 

Amsehd Rothschild, chair man of Rothschild Asset Management 
in London, had his doubts. “There are certainly lots of other names, 
he said modestly. 


Brandon Mitch ener 


a welcome development because it 
gave the currency room to rally. 

“At the start of the year, every- 
one was positioned for the dollar to 
go stronger,” said Norman Klath, 
with J. P. Morgan & Co. in New 
York. “The longer the market 
didn't move, the heavier became 
the burden of the negative carry.” 
He explained that investors paid 
5.75 percent to borrow Deutsche 
marks that they sold for dollars 
earning interest of only 3.125 per- 
cent. 


topped out at a 28-month high of 
1.7650 DM in early February, just 
after the Federal Reserve Board 
pushed up shart-tenn US. rates a 
quarter point and just before the 
government renewed its trade dis- 
pute with Japan, which weakened 
the dollar against most major cur- 
rencies. 


conditions this year are 
really lousy, so it was easier for 
both sides,* a European negotiator 
said. 

Japanese executives accepted the 
deal m stride. “We will continue to 
hold back our exports and 
the spirit of the agreement, 
was made under the premise that 
the EU car market will be com- 
pletely liberalized in the year 
2000,” said Yutaka Knrne, chair- 
man of the Japan Automobile 
Manufacturers Association. 

The surging yen pushed down 


Japanese car exports to the EU 
37.8 p 


In theory, the dollar's advance cm 
the currency market should have 
more than covered this cost and for 
a brief period h did. The dollar 


The subsequent sell-off in UJS. 
and European markets has meant 
there has been no substantial 
change in relative interest rates. 
Three-month interest rates are now 
2 percentage points, or 200 basis 
points, higher in Germany than in 
the United States, compared with 

See DOLLAR, Page 12 


percent in January, a 
that suggests total exports could 
slip 10 percent, to below 900.000 
units, in 1994, according to Peter 
Boardman, senior analyst at UBS 


Securities in Tokyo. 

market share in 


Japanese market share in the 
EU, however, could rise slightly 
from last year's 11.4 percent be- 
cause of expanded production at 
Japanese-owned plants in Britain. 

“Their market share will contin- 


car exports was established by a 
1991 accord intended to give Euro- 
pean automakers time to sharpen 
their competitiveness before facing 
full competition after 1999. 

The five markets where imports 
were restricted until 1992 — 
France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and 
Britain — will be opened to Japa- 
nese imports more rapidly. But to- 
tal export levels will be moderated 
to a level that ensures adequate 
cash flow to facilitate restr u cturing 
by European makers. 

Officially, the accord does not 
take into account production at 
Japanese plants in Europe. But so- 
called transplant production is im- 
plicit in numbers. 

This year, for example, the ex- 
port quota for Britain will fall to 
183,100 units from 202,800 as Japa- 
nese makers expand output at Brit- 
ish transplants. 

The export ceiling to France will 
rise to 74,900 units from 69,000; in 
Italy, to 47,000 units from 38,800; 
in Spain, to 32,400 units from 
29300; and in Portugal to 39300 
units from 39,000. 


THIS COULD 


BE YOUR 


TICKET TO 


WORLD CUP 



9 




wMmm&mz 




94 


Enroll for a Sprint 
FONCARIP* and 
you could win tickets 
to World Cup USA *94 ! 

Soccers premiere 
competition is coming to the 
U.S. And no one's more excited 

than Sprint! We're giving away 

tickets to some of World Cup 
USA 94 s hottest events. Including two tickets, 

plus hotel and airfare, to the final game at 

the Rose BowL A free trip to one of the play- 
off games. And all kinds of World Cup USA 
94 merchandise * 

To enroll, call the number below. And 
know that no matter what happens, you 11 get 
something valuable: Sprint's free World- 
Traveler FONCARD. With it, you 11 get Sprints 
low rates on every call English-speaking 
operators. And convenient billing options 



through your credit 
cards. Not to mention 
Sprint's limited-edition 
\ World Cup design. 

It's a reminder 
that Sprint is an official 
partner of World Cup USA 
94. As well as the event's exclusive 
provider of long distance voice and data 
telecommunications . 

So call and sign up for your WoridTraveler 
World Cup USA 94 FONCARD. It's your 
ticket to international excitement. 



Sprint 


Wbr/dCupUSAM §g 


CALL COLLECT TO THE U.S. AT 402-390-9083. 


•GmdftiwJricteB. 2 Mgte Had and fort-tip Cod Airfse BXteFuiGtfeai ite tote BmLRbMk: 2 Tietas. 2KgtaHod.«id 

l Sprta/Vtgtd Cap Prqflid Card Cafaccx Stt. Fifty iSOl TM Prim: Sprmr/W»M f»p TWl Sm ^ SoccwBig. 1 Mi$. I Spriai/WxU Cup T-Shin and 1 Spriayvfortd Cop Lmt&Tif. 


No pmdttie noxssnj to enter. All atria nut he teccnd by Much 31. 1994. Winner WiU be dma by undom Awing « AprU 30. One e*ty per hoesetnU. Tim proncooo a ofapd to the 

taws of die United Sous of America. Local hm apply; Vafid only where lari. Void where pmHrited, rejoined or axed, odaing tal not wed B ay dun or cteUoge Use tlm pnmnioB vUwt 
my law, rtytlilion or Stanford of aay couggy m which thk pifliliertuin ^ifraribwcd or told. Each tenant speafelly »igdgst »«fa the se UarintiottS and ggreci 10 lfride by teth fifa 

open to wqttoyen of Sprat or iu affiliates, their families or their agencies. All are property of their respective owner*. 6 1993 Sprint InternauwaJ ComBrenkaiions Cmponikn. 


ei 

tb 

iri 

us 

m 

th 

ioi 


I 




i 













Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Cfow o\ trading Friday, March 18. 


GroNomo WUy 
FO Name Lust Ch» 


AALMUhnk 
Bandp 9.99 
CaQrp 14.94 -.13 
MunBdp 1046 -53 
SmCoStk 11.63 - J7 

AARPBTVSt: 

BalS&fi n 1453 -.05 
CopGrn 3458 -40 
GinieMn 1139 ‘5? 
GrwInCn 33J5 -33 
HOBdfl 1199 -.03 
TxFBdn 17.76 -.06 
ABT Funds; 

Emarga 11B9 -55 
FL HI 1038 
FLTF 11X15 -55 
GwttUtiPX 10.99 -58 
UlUIlKP* 11.97 —.14 
AF LoCoo nIO.14 -.12 
AHA Funds: 

Bdan nx 1X38 —51 
Full 958 —52 
Lim 7024 —51 
AIM Funds 
AdiGve 9.76 -51 


GcvName Wkty 
FdNtnw Lest Chge 


Agrsvp 

BoIA e* 

Chart px 

ConsitP 

GaSca 

Grmer 

Ortho 


HYWBI .1058 


24.90 -53 
■4.1 1 -53 
9.14 -53 
18.98 -36 
9.71 —an 
1259 *J0 
12.12 -JO 
HYldAP 1009 -51 


S 04 —52 
1X79 —.16 
10X12 —51 
032 -52 
1021 -.IB 
1091 -51 
1079 -52 
1331 —.06 
1331 —55 
2258 -33 
2251 -33 
1059 - 30 


Incop 
lrfflEP 
LimMP 
MuBp 
Summit 
TeCTp 
TFtnt 
utop 
UWlBt 
valuer 
vaiup 
Weinflp 
amf Funds 
AdiMtg 9.94 
IntMtgn 971 —52 
Inffl-ian 1070 — 51 
MlgSecn 1050 
ARK Funds: 

CuoGen 10.99 -.11 
Grlncon 1068 -55 
income 95S — 51 
ASMFdn 1031 -58 
AccesurFundE 
irrtFKfnri 11.95 — Ji 
AccMortB 12X13 
ShtlntFx 12.12 
Acomln 1636 —.12 
AcmFd 1197 -.35 
AdsnCap 2232 -33 
AdvCBalP 1061 -.10 
AdvCRefp 1021 —57 
Advesl Advanh 
Govt np 9JS —51 
Gwttinp 1737 -.13 
HYBdP 959 *51 
Inconp 1294 +55 
MuBdNat 956 * 53 
Spd np 2157 -38 
Aetna Finds 
Aetna n 1058 * 37 
Bond n 1013 -51 
Grwinco 11.17 -.10 
fnHGrn 1133 
Alger Funds 
Growth t JIM 
IncG tr 1192 -.16 
MitJCpGr 113X12 -.06 
Em Cap 1 2350 -53 
Affiance Cose 
ABancep 7.06 -.17 
Baton p 14X13 -.14 
BaionB t 14.98 +.10 
BondAD 1453 -XU 
Canada p 181 -.14 
Cnstvlnv 1079 -.01 
CpGdBp 14X12 -53 
CpBdC P 1452 — 33 
Count p 1770 -36 
1235 -.12 


CHEAP 
GOVt A p 
Govffi p 
GovtCp 
Grolnc P 


: P 
GwthBt 
GrtncB p 
G rtnvB 
InMAp 
InsMuB 
InsMCp 
InttAp 
MrtgAp 
Mrig8o 


832 —51 
832 -51 
B32 —.01 
2.42 +51 
GwthC 2155 -38 
GwfhFp 2537 -33 
2154 -37 
251 *32 
1116 -59 
933 -56 
9.93 -56 
9.93 -56 
1839 

8.95 -51 
83S +51 
MrtgCp 8.95 -52 
MfgTrAo 954 —02 
MJgTBp 9.84 —52 
MlgTrCp 954 —.02 
M1HG 10.10 -51 
Mfllnt 155 — 0? 
MMSAp 8-54 —52 
MMSBl 8-54 —.02 
MCAAp 1035 -.02 
MuCABplOJS -52 
MuCA CplQ-15 -52 
MuFLCp 957 -56 
iCATA 13.10 -58 
MullCAB 1110 -58 
M1NBP 1039 -54 
MUOHCP 945 -56 
MuNJBp 946 - 54 
MuNJCp 946 -54 
MNYA 943 -53 
MuNYBp 943 + 53 
MuMYCp 943 -53 
NMuAD 1029 -XM 
NHMuCp 1039 - 54 
NEurAp 1145 -53 
NAGvA 940 -.12 
NAGvBp 940— .13 
NAGvC 940 — .12 
PfGrthApll33 +36 
PrGrthB PIX25 -36 
QusrAp 24.93 -70 
ST Mia P 9.00— XU 
STNUbl 950 — 52 
Techp 2941+154 
Wldlncp 158 
AmSauOl Funds 
Balance 1254 *58 
Bond 1086 —31 
Eauity 1&19 -.18 
Gvtln 946 —32 
LMMal 1043 —52 
RegEq 17J6 -J4 
Amanainc 13.15 -56 
Ambassador Fid: 
BolncF 1046 +.10 
Bond n 973 
CoreGrf=nl748 - 35 
Growth n 1450 t 33 
WxSIfcn 1118 +.12 
Irtieondn 974 —51 
InftStkn 1330 —.15 
SmCoGrnl443 -.12 
Antesodarlnv: 
Bwxin 973 
COreGrn 1747 +34 
Grwth n 1449 + 33 
IntBond n 974 —51 

imtstkn 13.19— .15 
SmCoGr nl442 +.12 
TFIrtBdnl032 -.04 
AndxKsador Rot A: 
Bondi 973 
CoreGr 1747 -34 
Grwth 1449 -33 
IntBond 974 —51 
IntlStk 13.19 —.15 
SmCoGr 1442 +.12 
TFlrtfBd 1 1032 - XM 
Amcore Vhdage: 

Equity 1045 +.13 
FxJnco 1005 —51 
IntdlTF 1019 +53 
AmerAAdvant: 

Bakxin 1134 *09 
Eauityn 1*05 -.16 
rntlEatyn 1238 —55 
LldTrm n 9.93 
AmerOvBafc 

Cms1Apxl*53 — XM 

CmsfB 0X1643 —.02 
CoBdBp 6.96 —.01 
CorpBdA p 6.96 _J1 
EmGrC 26.97 +43 
EGAs 27.TJ +44 
EmGrBp 26.65 +42 
EntAp 1179 +.16 
EntBp 1177 +.15 
EotvIncA PS.S3 —54 
EqlncBht 5.53 —JO 
EqJncCax 554 — XJ3 
ExchFd 114.01 -272 
FdMgAo 1235-52 
FMflB o 1126 —02 
GlEoAo 11 JBO 
GtEnBpn 1143 
GIGvA p H41 
GtGvBpn 045 
OGvCp 8J9— 01 
GvScAp 1039 + 51 
GvScBp IDJ9 
GvScCp 1038 - 51 
GvTgWp 1142 -56 
GvTIA p 849 
GvTIBp 849 
GvTICp 849 
Grinc px 1197 —30 
HarhA ox 1557 —33 


HorbBnx 1552 —30 
LfiYtdlnvA p643 - .02 
HiYIOBp 6.64 -52 
MuBAo 10.18 -XP 

Mimas p KLiB -xn 

PpceAp 1104 -.15 
POCCBp 1 158 -.15 
TEKYApl6?5 -.03 
TEHiYBpIQ.95 -XU 
TmExIA Pi 1 30 * J3? 
TSElBp 1139 -.01 
TXMSAp 9.99 -XU 
UtBAp 9XM — xn 
American Funds 
AmBalp 1230 -XM 
Amcpp 13.19 -39 
AmMuflP2144 -.17 
BandFdn 1196 —51 
CdPtnBlp 33.16 -.08 
COPWWPX1S54— .23 
CwiWGr 18.07 
EUPOCP 2244 —59 
Fdtavp 1835 - 28 
Govtp 1341 —53 
GvrthFdp2745 -41 
HI T-stP 14.98 —41 
IncaFdp 14.07 -57 
IntSdp 1343 —53 
In vCoA p 1875 - 34 
LWTEBd 1*33 -.01 
NwEconp3077 -44 
NewPerpl531 -57 
SmCpW P3AI7 -34 
TcnExptpU.91 -51 
TxErCAp 15.67 -54 
TxExMD pi 532 - 5! 
TxcxVA pl5XM -53 
WshMutpxl7-51 - .12 
Am&Wth 9.80 —52 
AHerlign 138 — 53 

Amur Nad Funds 

Growth 439 -56 
Income 2147 -30 
Triflex 1548 *.19 
API Cr Ipn 1 3.15 -.13 
Am Perform; 

Bond 943 —51 
EaUilV 11.77 +.08 
InlSd 1052 —41 
AmUtlFdn 2140 
AmwvMutl 7.95 -30 
Analytic n 1110 -.02 
AnchOwf 30.73 -34 
Anuta Funds 
AZTF 1040 * 53 
COTF 1036 -XP 
HITF 1143 -XP 
KYTF 1047 -XU 
NrgnSTF 9.79 -XM 
OR TF 1047 +XU 
TxFUT 948 
Aquinas Fund: 

Balance n 9.98 -46 
Eqlncn 9.70 +.10 
Fxfncn 9.82 —.01 
Ardi Funds 
Bat 10.14 -.10 

EmGrrti 1240 -37 
GovCorn 1037 
Grolnc 1339 - 33 
MoTF 1136 -55 
US Cm 10.W 
Armstng n 8.93 + .18 
AtiantoGrp1l47 -.18 
Atlas Funds 
CaMoni 11.10 -.05 
CAJns 10.19 -XP 
GvtSec 1038 - 52 
Grolnc 1*77 -77 
NaMuni 11.16 -XM 
BB&T Funds 
BalBn 10.13 -56 
GmlncT n!lJ3 -.13 
IntGovTn 944 —.02 
SIGovTn 9.93— XJ1 
BEA Funds 
EMfc£f 2278 —.96 
IntlEo 1944 —40 
SlgFxIn p 16.99 —55 
BFAAShOu n 944 -^01 
BJBGIAo 1146 —52 
BJBIEoAp 1230 —43 
BNYHanatua: 

Ealncn 1141 -.12 
IntGovt 977 —.01 
NYTEn 10.14 -XM 
Bataon Group: 

Band L n 148 
BandSn 10.04—52 
E«erp2n 18.14 -.10 
Enfrpn 1498 -38 
Gwttin 1330 -.19 
Inti 1447 — 37 
Shadow n 12.76 -30 
TaxFWn 1079 -52 
TaxFrLn 847 + 45 
UMBBn 11.13 —51 
UMBHrtn 948 -.11 
UMBStn 1447 -.17 
Value nx 2638 -78 


Grp Name WUy I Grp Name'' WUy 

Fd None Last Chga Fd Name Last Qtga 


Divena n 12.95 -53 
intlEqn 426-51 
IrrfJFI n 947 -54 
Baird Funds 
Adflnc 933 —51 
BtChipP 1849 - 35 
CmOevp2451 -38 
BakrGvn 
BanhenTrush 
instAMot 9.96 -56 
mstEfljn 104S -.11 
InvlmTF 1037 + 53 
InvtntEa 1357 +52 
InvUtan 10.43 -51 
BcxanAstn 2253 +49 
Bartlett Funds: 
BascVIn 1548 -32 
Flxedl n 1059 -51 
VI Inti 1243-07 

ouVruim* insn: 

ST Yield 9.83 
Bandn 9.91 

1I7J -.19 
Invest 
r I 943 
Bond n 9.91 
Equity n 1T33 +.19 
BeucHOl 3033 +56 
BSEmgDUr 954 -52 
Bendmprk Funds 
Balanced nllU8 +X17 
BondAn 1933 +55 
Dh/GrAn 1151 -.15 
EqtdxAn 1151 -.11 
FocGrAn 11.06 -.13 
ShtOurn ia02 
SIBdAn 2057-51 
SmCotA 11.97 -35 
LfSGvAn 1977 —51 
USTldxA n20.10 _ 

Benham Group: 
AdrGavn 977 —51 
CoTFI n 11XU 1 53 
CaTFlnn 9.92 -XP 
CaTFSn 1030 
CtXTFHn 938 + 55 
CatTFLn 11.16 -57 
EqGran 12.14 +.15 

EurBdn 1047 —57 
GNMA n 1043 - 52 
Gotdtnn 1239 - 58 
IncGron 15.12 +.15 
LTreosn 952 
NfTFIn 1079 +54 
NITFL n 1144 +53 
STTrwan 959 
Tarim n 94.14 _j>i 
TartOOOn 69.13 +53 
Tar2005n4834 +41 
TarJOlO n 3il7 +.18 
Tor2015 n 2637 +.14 
TortMOn 1834 +.13 
TNoten 1035 -52 
Utfllncon 948 -56 
BerwGttMae 

100 pn 17^1 +33 

101 pn 11.71 — XP 
SmCoGr 173 +.06 

Bernstein Ftls 
GvShDu n 1247 
ShtDurn 1155 -51 
tnlDurn 13.16 -52 
CoMun 1345 +JM 
DtvMwinl337 *.03 
NYMun n 1338 -53 
lnltValn 1462 -.18 
BerwvnFd nl933 +39 
Berwyn Inc nl 246 *56 
BWrudMCG1249 + 36 
Batmora Funds 
Balanced 1044 + 56 
Equity 1042 -.13 
Ealndex 1047 -.11 
Fixed Inc 944 
STFIxfnc 940 
SCNUM 1047 -53 
Blanchard Funds 
AmerEfl niojB +.13 
RxTFBd 0 4.96 -53 
Flexlncn 5.00 —51 
GtGrnp 1044 * 53 
PreMnp 732 — XM 
5TGln 752 + 51 
ST Bond n 2.97 
BdEndow 1740 -51 
Boston Co Insh 
AsaMprsnll.94 -56 
CaApBp 2848 +.18 
nqsBnp 1275 —52 
MadIBnp 11.16 —51 
Boston Co Remit 
AtacAp 1543 -.10 


CapAAp 2858 +.18 
ItgsAp 12.75 —.02 
InIA 1X47 -.10 
MsdIAp 11.16 — X» 
SPGrAp 17.62 -42 
TfBdA 1159 -XM 
Boulevard Rinds 
BiOdp 952 +55 
Manplrc 971 -.01 
StralBof 9.92 -XP 
Brlasm Funds 
BrlnsnGI t1074 -XM 
BdnsGIBF 9.79 —03 
NUSEOfy 9.92 - 07 
Bmdywn n 27 33 +40 
Bruce n 10636 -47 
BrundaSI n 1045 —52 
BuB&BearGp: 
Gtolncnp 9J1 —.04 
Gatdlrrvnpl750 - .14 
GovtSecnplil9 -52 
Mulncp 1645 + 55 
QuatGlhPl433 -Jff 
SpEao 2Z69 -36 
USOVS np 832 
Burnham P 2080 -XJ7 
CtSRttyn 34.92 +43 
CGM Funds 
AmerTF 948 + 52 
CttoOevn 29.96 -.99 
Fxdlncn 1154 — 52 
Mull n 29X17 -.16 
Colmosp 14.13 -.07 
CATFIn 1034 -J05 

Cofifamia Trust 

Cdllncn 1242 -58 
CaflJ5n 1041 —51 
S&PSOOn 1130 +.10 
S&FAAhl 1240 -XM 
Cdlvert Group: 

ArM 3044 - .47 
ArletAp 7330 +33 
” _ 1 80S +58 

17 06 — 41 

1033 -53 

1034 +XP 
30,15 +.12 
1648 —51 

22^9 -36 

TxFLtdn 10.72 +51 
TxFLng 1646 -53 
TXFVT 1630 +XI7 
USGov 1447 -XM 
CdmbndseFds 
CapGrA 1537 + 
GvInA 1341 
GwthA 1644 - 37 
MwIncA 1X18 - " 
CaoGrBi 1534 
GvInBt 1343 - 52 
GwthBt 1638 - 36 
IncGrBtx 1441 -.1 
MuIncBt 1X19 +52 
CapMkldx n1130 -.11 
CapaaEqn 9.96 -.12 
COpitaJFIn 1007 


1050 - 

864 -57 
1247 -56 
8.93 

11X15 -XM 
941 —52 
1156 -.11 
7.9! -55 

1041 - 55 
939 —^72 
9.91 -51 
1059 -55 
1040 -XM 
1043 -.03 

1042 -.04 
1045 -34 
11.95 -51 
12.16 -38 
1955 — .78 
11.72 -.04 


Divlnl 
Eqflnct 
Euro I 
GUI 

GbDivr 
FedSect 
HdhSct 
HiYUl 

MuAZt 
Inrmdi 
LtdMuni 
MuCAt 
MUFLt 
MUNJI 
MuOHp 
M uflPAt 
NYTxFl 
NIRst 
POCGrt 

PrcMI 

FYanierp 8.94 
SeUMup 1239 - 51 
Managed 11 1.04 -53 


ST Bd 

STUSn 

Strait 

Tax£». 

usGvtr 

UtBnt 

VdAdt 

WWInc 


9.73 —XU 
1057 — XP 
1X17 -.11 
1130 +XU 
951 —51 
1373 —55 
20J7 -38 
875 —54 


WkJWdt 1844 —19 
TCBalp 1054 —.03 
TCCort 1357 -58 
1059 -57 
1345 —48 
977 -51 
1048 - 35 


GktoEq 

loco 

MBCAi 

Munkrt 

Social o 

SocSd 

SocEq 


•32 


EmgGrn 1X45 
Grwth 1223 
CtspietUfl 940 —SO 
Capstone Group: 

Fund SW 1848 * 44. 
Gvtlnc 4.79 
MedRs 1935 —.10 
NZkmd 11.99 +55 
N Japan 743 -.15 
US Trend 1451 +.16 
Confine! Family-. 
XVoaGth 1049 +54 
Balanced I0J7 -59 
Fund 1X13 +58 
GovtOUig 035 —.01 
cariiCo x 1120 +52 
ComeeOHTE9.73 
CUKBIA 1166 +.14 
CnKBIB 1163 +.13 
CenlumGp 943 -.12 
CntryShrn +44 
OtCopBC 1X55 -.11 
ChesGrth 7450 -36 
CHeshd 14638 +2X19 
Q»CMiTwnl4177 -52 
ChubbGrfn 1732 - 35 
OruddTR 1532 -.16 
dtooern 5042 -35 
Cotautd Funds 
intEotp 1954 -59 
CalTEA 737 +52 
Con TEA 751 -XM 
FedSec 1076 —52 
FLTE A 749 + 52 
FundAX 841 +.04 
GrwThA p 1440 -34 
HlYldA 657 
incomeAoSJO 
IrUGfA 1845 —53 
MATxA 7.77 +53 
Ml TEA 6.97 -XP 
MN TEA 7.17 -52 
NOtResA 1286 -32 
NY TEA 7.12 -XP 
Oh TEA 737 + 53 
SmStkP 1848 +43 
StrttncA 731 —52 
TxExAp 1343 -XM 
TxInsAp LIB +.04 
USGrA 1134 +.13 
USGvA 641 
UtBAp 1278 —SO 
CATEBt 737 +52 
CTTEB1 741 +54 
F«dSc8t 1076 -52 
FL TxBI 749 -52 
RindBhc 842 +.07 
GIEqB 1253 -.01 
GwthBt 1444 +34 
HYMuB I 1057 _ 

HYSecBt 197 
Incomes 640 
InlGrB 1043 -XP 
MATxBt 777 +.03 
NdlResBtl253 -32 
NYTxBt 7.12 +53 
OHTXBI 737 -53 
StrttnBl 731 -52 
1343 -m 
L18 +54 
1X16 -.14 
641 

1278 -57 


TxExBt 

sus?.' 

ffif* 


TClncp 
TCLott 
TCNorfp 
TCSCpt . 

DelGrp Instt 
Decl I 1674 -.15 
Detwii 1848 -.11 
Dtcpl 2745 -35 
Dtdu 7.04 
TsvRsI 942 —02 
DetowareGraupc 
Trend p 1419 -.14 
Vutuep 21.08 -36 
Detcapp 2734 -45 
Dearf 1674 -.15 
Dectrilp I3X» -.13 
Deiawo 1847 -.11 
rntlEqp 1236 * X>5 
Detchp 7 04 
USGovte 845— .04 
Trees n 942 
TxUSp 1X29 -XP 
Txlnsp 11.18 
TxFrPOP 847 -51 
Dimcnsiamd Fds 
US Lrg TAD? +.14 
USSnri 892 -.18 
US6-10n 1X16 -74 
Xapann 2658 -44 
UKn 2x01 
Qxrtn 1445—51 
DFARJEstM46 +.15 
Ftocdn 10146 -XM 
GtBd 10X02 
Gavin 10X49— .18 
lntGv 110.48 —.17 
IntlHBM 1139 
L Copint 1233 -XM 
PocRim 1648 —47 
USLgVd 1048 -XP 
USSmVdl 1250 -30 
Dodge&Cax: 

Baton nx 4652 —.16 
income ml 147 —35 
Stock nx 5549 
DomSooal 1249 -.15 
Draman Raids 
Conrm 1459 -.17 
HtRtn 1636 +.19 
SmCpVainl155 -.15 
Dreyftis 

A Bond n 1445 - 51 
Aprecnp 1450 -XM 
AsMtAltnl27b -XM 
Seined 1334 -.17 
1495 -55 
1345 -XP 
1230 -52 
1340 -.12 
1X65 -.14 
1334 +53 


• Grp Nome WUy 

Fd Nome Lott One 


NCTxFt 1035 +.04 
OhTxFI 1066 -54 
ORTxFf 1048 -XM 
PA TF I 1071 +53 
RITxFt 947 -.06 
SCTxFt 1029 -XM 
TNTxFt 1035 +55 
VATxFt 1042 -XP 
WVTxFf 9.70 -M 
EdioEan 1432 - 38 
ECBpBd 1938 -.14 
E merald Funds 
EmEqt 1X10 -59 
EmrtdUS >039 — 51 
FLTE 1092 -55 
SmCapf n 1042 +.16 
EmpBId 17.93 -58 
Endow 17.17 -.10 
Enterprise Gramc 
CopApp 3230 -41 
GvSecp 1X12 +52 


Gwttinp 

Grtncp 

HYBdp 

InilGrp 

SmCo 

TEITKP 

EotySln 


870 +.13 
1833 -37 
1142 —52 
17.17 —.15 
546 - 58 
1373 +56 
3445 + 459 


Grp Nome wwy jGrpNcm* Mdr Grp Nomo WMr 
Fd Name Last drgel Fd Name Lfl*t Oige ! Fd Nar» Last Oh* 


IncoSer 
IN TF 
InMAdi 
msTF 


CotTxn 
Count n 
CTtofn 
Orwfus 
EdBInd 
FLIntn 


GNMA np 1455 + 52 
GnCA 1157 -54 
GMBdp 1510 -51 
GNYp 2029 -56 
Grtncn 1738 -.19 
GwthOpn 10.93 -.10 
InsMun npiaiO +58 
tntermn 1417 +53 
InterEqp 1543 — Xt5 
InvGNn 1504-51 
MAlntn 1377 + 52 
MA Tax 01644 -XP 
MunBdn 1277 -XM 
NJlntn 1343 - 51 
NXMunnl347 
NwLdr 3556 +77 
NYlTxnp 1144 +51 
NY Tax n 1549 +XM 
NYTEP 1812 +XM 
Feoplndt ILIA +.16 
PeoWdml778 + 37 
ShlnGvn 11.12 — 52 
STIncpn 1X21 —51 
ShlnTp 1114 
ThdCntrn 840 +.10 
USTInt 1113 -XP 
USTLng 1446 -JC 
USTShn 1541 —59 
Dreyfus Comstodc 
CapVcdA 1144 —.11 
CapVoffitll49 -.11 
PSteAP 9.72 
PtSTBVOt 972 
Dreyfus Premier: 
CAMimAllOO +54 


Evwvean Funds 
Evrgmn 1479 +.18 
Found n 1X1? -58 
GtoRen 1447 —.13 
LtdMktn 2276 -.12 
MiHiCAn 1021 +51 
MuniFn 1036 - 51 
Muniins n 1037 - .05 
Retire n 1148 -XJ7 
TotRtn 19.18 -.17 
VotTmn 1548 + 30 
Excel Midas All +.06 
ExlRuHip 7.86 -51 
FAMVatn 2046 + 76 
FBL Series 
BJQHpt 1952 -.10 
Growth t 1348 +.19 
tfiGrBdt 1037 —51 
HlYBdt 1044 — X>1 
Mangdt 1X26 -.12 
FFB Lexicon: 

CopApp 1178 +58 
Fxdin (029 
lntGv 10.19 
SeJVPkjeplin +.19 
FFBEq 1CL99 +.17 
FF8NJ 1040 -54 
FFTW Funds 
imWdg 975 - 58 
US Short 9.96 
WWHedg 975 —52 
WW Fxdln 9.70 -51 
FMB Funds 
DtvECp 1144 +57 


1144 -57 
1032 -^01 
1032 —.01 
1045 -XP 
1045 - 53 


Qdumbio Funds 
Balance nl8X}7 -.11 
CdmSHci 


:n 1572 +.16 
Fixed n 1302—51 
874 

2741 -32 
1338-52 
1118 +53 
20.91 -46 


Govt 
Grthn 
InHSfkn 
Munin 
Seed n 


inffiq 

InilR 

MunSd 

NXMun 

Shrtlnl 


-Xfl 


Common Sense: 

Govt 1075 —51 
Grolnc 1637 +.17 
Growth 1593 -XM 
_MunB 1347 -XP 
Compass awflut 
Eqfylnco 1254 + 30 
Fxtffn 1043 
Growth 1144 
1X57 

1049 —51 
1049 +56 
11.13 +55 
1042 
Group: 
1256 +.10 
Growth p 1177 +39 
IneoFdP 953 + 51 
NWSOp 1512 -32 
TaxExp 747 + 53 
USGov p 1043 * 51 
Conestoga Funds 
Equity 1537 +.12 
Incm 1043 —51 
LtaMcT 1042 —51 
Conn Mutual: 

Govt 1048 
Grwth 1548 + 59 
Income 9.7i 
TolRet 1470 +55 
Copfevn 2046 -XI2 
CoreFunds: 

BckmAn 1072 +X» 
Eqtdx 2176 * XM 
GIBdA n 944 — XP 
GrEqAn 1042 +36 
IntBdA n 957 -51 
IntIGrAn 1140 -^10 
ValEqBprtUXJS +.17 
CoweniGr xll.ll — XJ2 
COwenOp 1330 + 43 
CrabbeHitson: 

AstAfl p 1335 +.14 
Equity p 1640 + 37 
QRMunN1244 - 53 
Special n 1344 +31 
cresrFunds Trust 
Bandn 94] —51 


SIBdn 

SpEan 

Vixuen 

VAMun 


9.91 -52 
1X13 -30 
1143 -30 

9.92 


CuFdAdin 1Q.D1 +51 
CuFdST n 951 — 51 
Cuher Trust: 

ApvEan 1031 +.13 
Eqtytnco nl052 +.12 
GovfSecnlOXK — 51 
DFAintVal nlOXP 
dg Investor: 

Equity 10.98 +.12 
Govflnco 978 — XJ2 
LTGovt 953 -51 
Munilnc 1043 -XM 
Deat Witter: 

AmValt 2AI9 +30 
CafTxFr 11250 +XJ5 
CaoGrvt 1242 +55 
Canvtl mo -50 
DvGtfll 1955 + 43 
DfvGlhl 3059 -.17 


MuA 1X15 +52 
CapGth 1646 +.17 
CTMuBI 1115 -52 
FLMunA 1451 +54 
“ lnvArtT577 -56 
1 1546 — XB 

1A50 +51 

Gamtfit 1451 -51 
MAMunAllS? -52 
MDMURA1X82 -51 
MIMuiA 1547 +54 
MN MmiA15.15 +53 
MDMuBI 1252 +51 
MuBrfit 1435 - 

MimlBdA 1435 +51 
NC MuA 1337 +52 
NCMuBt 1336 +52 
NYMunAlASS +55 
NY Ml>B 11455 +54 
OH MuA 13X15 
OHMbB I 13x36 
PA MunA 1648 +51 
PA MUB 11647 +51 
TXMuA 21 XC +X>5 
VAMuA 1648 +53 
VAMuBt 1648 + 53 
Dreyfos Strategic 
GIGrp 35X35 -vlO 
Growth p 3931 +JD 
income d lAlo — xn 
hvA 2174 +40 
InvBt 2156 +.40 
OupraeMuhxd: 
IrrtGavn 1079 
KYTFn 749 -JD 
KYSMfn 533 
EM Finds 
EauOvp 60.90 +49 
Flexp 5474 +40 
Income p 4744 —52 
Mufliflx 4052 +71 
Eaton Vane* 

China p 1A03 —70 
EVSIk 1X77 +.15 
Growth p 836 +57 
IncSasp 845 — xn 
MunBd laiO +XM 
STGWt 894 +51 
STTsyp 5578 +53 
SpcEqtp 856 +.12 
TrndGvt 11,18 —.03 
Tradlrtvp 774 +XM 
TrxttfTotlnxBJO — .10 
Eaton Vance Classic 
FLUdP 946 * 52 
Govt p 970 — XJ3 
NatlMunp 956 +51 
Eaton V LM Mty. 
OHTxFt 9.92 +.03 
CaTxFI 1024 +XJ1 
FLTxFI 1037 +XJ2 
MATxFt 10.J6 +XZ2 
MITxFl 974 +XP 
NaTTxFTUOJS +51 
NXTxFf 1023 +XJ2 
NYTxFt 1035 -XB 
PATxFt 1070 +XB 
Eaton VMandhn: 
Chlriat 1177—58 
ALTxFt 1054 +55 
AZTF I 1074 -XM 
ARTxFt 1077 +54 
CtfMnl 976 +XM 
COTxFt 1033 -51 
CTTxFt 1042 -X« 
Eolnf 1136 -XJ7 
FWTxFt 10.93 -XM 
GATxFI 10.16 4X0 
GovlCWt 949— XP 
rtlnct 748 —51 
KYTxFt 1031 +54 
LATTt 1040 + 55 
MDTxF 11041 +51 
MATxFl 1045 *XO 
MITxF t 1051 -XM 
MNTxFI 1036 -XB 
MOTxFt 1040 4X1* 
NJTFt 1071 454 
NYTxFl 11.08 *J33 
NtMunt 1053 +XJ2 


DivEI 
IntGCp 
InfGI 
MiTFp 
MtTFI 
FPAFUods 
capit 20.93 
Newrlnc 1079 
PmtlnJ 1AM 4 .18 
Peren 2X15 -.12 
Fairmtn 2577-155 
Fasdanon 17.90 +72 
Fqderatod Funds 
ArmSSpn 9.83 —51 
Arm l n 973 — .01 
ExchFd n7376 + 1XJ7 
F*atfSn 1051 -.02 
FSTItsn 895— .01 
FGROn 2377 -J3 
FHYTn 971 -51 
FTTISfi 1022 —51 
FtTSSO 1032 —51 
FsictlSn 1041 —51 
FsiWVSSpl041 —51 
FSTn 2671 +77 
FSTISSp 895—51 
GnmolSnllXP — XC 
GnmaSp 1173 — XE 
FtotSSp 1051 — XK 
IMTIS 1049 4 52 
MaxCap 1252 -.11 
Mintcapnl2XP -33 
ShrtTerm 1034 
USGavtn 10-ia -52 
SBFAn 1642 +.11 
HdefiTy AdvbaR 
EqPGR 3078 +40 
EqPIficx 1558 +.13 
GlWResc 1757 + 45 
Gov in p 949 — xn 
GrwOppp2642 +78 
HIMup 1111 +XM 
HfYldpn 11.90 +55 
IricGtp 1544 + 57 
LUTB1R10.1S -XB 
LfdTBfi 1073 —55 
LldTEI 10.15 +52 
OvseoP 1378 * 52 
STFip 956— .03 

StraJOpp 2057 +59 
Ftdaflly Iratitut 
EqPGtn 3049 +79 
Ectfhlnx 1546 +.11 
IShlGv 9.60 —51 
LtBln 1074 — 55 
FideBr Invest 
AarTFm 1176 +52 
AMgrn 15.14 +53 
AMgtGrnl437 +.03 
AMgrtnn 1095 +53 
BahtoCx 1379 —57 
BlueOt 2579 -59 
CAInsn 1046 + 56 
CATFn 1150 -53 
Canadan 1156 +48 
CopApp 17X13 +.14 
Coplnco nr 9.99 -XP 
CongrSI rf 51.12+ 179 
Contra 3111 +55 
CnvSecn 1679 +.14 
DeSfnyl 1753 + 31 
Destinyll 2855 +72 
DisEqn 1937 - 35 
DfwrWlnlXI5 +.01 
DrvGthn 1273 + 32 
EmaGrarlL07 -40 
EmrNUct 17.16-44 
Equfinc 3359 -35 
EOt In 1892 +34 
Eqldx 1742 +.17 
ErCttoApnllTO +XJ5 
Europe 19.95-51 
E*d^dr102ja-1£7 
RdNFdnxl932 +30 
Fitly 1096 +37 
GNMn 1044 451 
1154 — X)6 

'2-2 *-£ 

9.90 — XP 

29.91 474 
2248 +57 
1278 +XM 
InsMun n 1146 +57 
W8d n 1041 —54 
UtortSvtn 944 -52 
InflGrln 17.94 +56 
InvGBn 753 -52 
Japan n 1359 4X79 
LatlnAm n!532 —70 
LtdMun 959 +53 
LowfYr 1828 +30 
MJTFn 1173 +55 
MNTFn 1095 +52 
Mopelian 7558-172 

MkMndnr3A92 +75 
MATFn 1154 +56 
MfaeSecnlOJ? — 51 
Munaatn 826 *53 
NYHYn 1X15 +55 
NYlnsn 1140 +56 
NewMWnlQ90 —75 
NeucMBl 1272 +74 
OTC 2814 +50 
OhTFn 7145 +XM 
Ovrsea 2852 —51 
PoCSas 1869 
Puritan* 1L19 ->Q5 
ReaflSstn 1471 +.14 
RetGrn 1872 + 58 
SMTBdn 971 — XM 
ST Wtd n 973 —53 
SmaBC0pll52 +70 
SE Aslan 1X91 —76 
SlkScn 2008 +32 
StrOpot 2037 +.1Q 
Trend n 5937 +157 
USBln 1048 -71 
UtOlncn 1478 +XM 
V4uen 4277 +71 
Wridw 1344 


Softwrr 2932 - 49! 

Tedir 4A31 +57' 

Telecom r3741 -58; 

Tronsr 2X19 -.19 
Util r 1677 -.13' 

FMeBty Spartnrc ' 
AorMunnTO.03 -52 1 
CAHYri) 1046 -XC ; 

CTHYnr 11.10 -XM 
FLMura 1050 -.02 
GNMA n 9.90 
Gavin n 1074 
HigMnm 1X3S -.03. . - 

mtMun f 1051 -XM, NJTF 
InvGrBd nlO.1? —51 ' NYlrs 
LfdOv 9.84 -• NY Tax 

LTGn 1171 -53 NCTF 
AAD Mu rn 959 - XP ' 

Morin r 1078 +XJ2 
NJHYr 1135 -XU 
MY HY m 1042 -xn 
PAHYm 1058 -XM 
9trinc n 97* — XP 
SlnKWn 948 — 02 1 
ShtrnMun 9.92 -52 


277 - 51 HMlarTtGr 1556 - 36 
1179 - 52 HomsfcSd n 112 - 

952 - HamsfdVl 1811 -32 

1X26 -XM HorocMn n 2049 +78 


NYVUmlTKUS HudsanCapl376 -5? 


1349 


HummertndOJA — 51 


Grp Name Wkty Grp Marne Wkty Grp Nome WMy GrpNonK WUy Grp Name *** G g, l Sl^, lmi LadO»99l WNo-ite Loacftm 

Fd Name Last C3>«ej FdNvne Last (3ige Fd Nane Last C3>ge , Fd Name Lad Chge Fd Name Lost Chge . Fd Nome [ , < 4 


Wkty 



intlEfl _ . 

KYTF 1090 -XM HummrG 

LATF 1176 -XB HypSD 9.01 . , 

MD TF 11.17 -XM HynSM 970 -5] 

MossTF 1141 -XM lAATrGr 1670 -.15 [ 

MiChTxF 1X06 -XJ5 IA1 Funds J 

MNtns 1117 -XM Baton pn 1059 --1? • 
MOTF 11.74 - XJ5 . Bond nr 959 -52 


Grawih 1845 - 71 
hSYMx 836—53 
STGlx 7.19—55 
Stolnt x 835 —05' 

SmCpEq 1X29 -.16. 


CturroA t 
IvyEaA 
GrthA p 
GrtnAP 
IrdtAp 


twrjx 1477 -.11 Mainstay Funds 


944 —42 
195« +41 
1543 - 31 
9.99 -56 
2776— 70 


OfiidTF 

OR7F 


PacGrwth 15XC 
PATF 


1142 -XB 
11.13 -X17 
1193 +.03 
1170 -XP' 
1X2? -55, 
1150 -XM ’ 


1041 -XC I 
641 -58,' 


2X38 -.13 [Kail Ponds 

ExEafns 1354 - 37 
Fxdkilns 9.90 
IdxEekn 11.15 -.10 
IniEams 1342 -.02 
LtMatlns 9.86 -51 
MedTEIn 1818 -XM 
MIMulrts 9.93 -XB 
VtdEqln 10.76 -XM 


CaApf 

Convt 

CrpBdt 

Eqtox 

Globlf 

Gautt 


EqlnCICI 1147 -.12 
EQlnlA 1147 -.12 
EatnTA 1171 -.13. 
EindTA 1032 -.101 
FIC4MM 1073 -53, 
GAIT An 1Q56 - 53; 


GiEnBf 

GlinBt 

QGJBt 

HIInBlx 

(ncBt 


1150 - 35' inVerA h> 1279 -59 ; Ijoi JnflFxin n 2331 — . 

1049 —52 ; Mull LAP 1177 -38; Gra^jn jymTEBDI047 + 

■HI-"; tSSKi IISiS; SSS," it -S WS" K: 


895 

iaxn 


PocGrA 
STGIAP 


, gS— 51' JSSSn jI|S 2 j%\ 

2395 -JO GvTTAn" 18M — 51 ! Mhfns'f 1049 ^5i j CcUMuf 1T^» * ^5 j SMWgrpn 73 - -O ' , SWrft”* 5 
1340 -.18 GVttCt 10.14—31 NTaxBtx 1175 -53 1 Ad|B_f . \ *£2™ ®a34 +51 

15.61 *07 


trrvGBtx 1049 —511 UtilAfp 


intlEatv n 2675 — .U 1 
IntiFxin n 2330 — JM 
35! 

XM J 

StARn 19.64 —51 
SmCpEq n51 51 *58 


EmgGrpnl671 -72 
Govt pn 1816 -51 
Grtncp 1A74 -34 Keystone: 
IntFdn 1197— XM | CusBil 
IntlBd 953 -1 

Midcap n 1442 - 351 
Region np22XM -35! 

Resrvpn 1051 ~\ 

Value n 1237 -.15 1 


CusB2t 
CusB4t 
QnKlt 
CUSK21 
CusSI I 
CUS53 1 


PremRr 

Piter TF 1142 -XC IBM Mutual Funds r 
SI Gov 1077 — XB L*ueConl534 -.15 1 CUS54I 
SmCaoGr 1195 -38; MuniBd 1817 -54 1 Infl t 


FkScaon 1945 +.19 ! TAGov 1057 -XU I Snu*!Conl876 -7B 


VATF 1142 -XU 


59 Wall Sheet 
EuraEq 3052 -77; 

PocBsn 3950—1.13 
Sm Co 1X84 -.17 

T*FSl 1031 -XB 

RnHorGvt 1078 —51 Frankfin Mgd Tr: 
RnHorMu 1875 -.02; CorpOual P2434 - 51 ; 
Hrol AmerFdsC mvGrodep?33 -51, 
AsfAliln 1865 -58 1 RisDIvp 1A89 — dp I 
Bafancsl nl047 + XM | Fmnfcfin Terwh | 


TxAdHY 877 — XB I USTreas nlOJ2— XB 
TX TF 1155 -51 Utility 1041 -.03 
USGov Sc 689 +.02 ;IDEX Grasp: 

Ut Biles 971—57' tdex 1942 *X» 


GtoBdn 
GvtSec n 

Sx 

HSYId 


Eqkfcln 1891 +.11 
FxdliKl n 1887 —51 
GovBdln 937 — XP 
Intlndn 957 — XB 
LWlncln 9.97 
MIBSecI n 10.15 —51 
MunBdln 1055 -54 
ReaEaln 1X80 -.11 
SnecEql nl659 + 37 
Stoddn 1659 +.19 
KrstAmer Funds 
AstAllp 1046 -59 
Baton P 10.87 +56 
Equity P 1659 - 37 
EqlCbCP 1891 -.11 
FxdlrtCP 1857 — 4X1 
Govfldp 937 
Inline P 957— 52 
LfdTnC 957 
MlgSecp 1815 —52 
MunBdP 1055 -XM 
RegEdP 1250 +.11 
StockP 1659 +.19 
FsrBaslG 950 -XU 
FstEaalnr 1610 +34 
FrstFdE 1035 +.18 
FtHwMu 1897 +54 
First investor* 
BiOtiPP 15.99 *J7 
Gtoblp 611 
Govtp 1134 
GfOlnCP 677 +59 
HigtiYdp 570 +.01 
incnmeo A15 *51 
InvGrdP 9.99— XB 
LifeSCp 1A44 +33 
LXfeHYn 1155 +52 
USAnp 1232 +.19 
MATFP 1131 +54 
Ml TF p 1273 -XB 
NJTFP 1X96 -XJS 
NYTxFTPlA65 +54 
PATFP 1254 +53 
SpecBd 1259 *33 
SpSil p 1895 +38 
TaxExct p!812 +54 
TotRefP 1X15 -.13 
utnincop 541 
VATFP 1X5! +57 
FarstMul 1051 +51 
RrSOntaba: 

Equity n 1078 -XI7 
Fxdlncn 1810 —31 
SJFxInn 9.92—51 
FPOvAstP 125? +XM 
FPMuBdP 1X07 +51 

First Priority: 

EqultyTrn1073 +.10 
FxdlncTr 1811 —52 
LtdMGv 955 —51 
RrSI Union: 

Barn* 1110 —51 
BalC In* 1X11 +51 
BaJBpx 1X10-51 
FxIrtBP* 1814 —56 
FxInTnx 181* — X16 
HiGdTFBplQXM +52 
HiGcm=C H864 +52 
MrBdT tlXlD.08 — XI5 
NCAAunCtlOXn +53 
USGtfTBP 974 —51 
USGvtCr 974 — XU 
Values PX1748 -XV 
ValueCkwl749 - 59 
VahtoT nx?748 -56 
FrsJFdFn 977 —5! 
Flog Investors 
EmGthP 1330 + 39 
lntlnp 1070 -51 
InlTrp 1116 —35 
MMunlP 1047 -56 
QualGrp 13X15 +.16 
TeHncShPll37 +57 
ToIRTsyP 954 —52 
Value P 1143 +.10 
Flagship Graqn 
AATEaP 1886 -53 
AATECP 1055 +53 
AZTEn 1071 -55 
CTTEAP 1845 +53 
COTEp 957 + 52 
FLTHp 1866 -54 
GATEp 1049 + 53 
IP 1857 + 59 
p 1042 -XU 
KYTEAP 10.92 -52 
KSTEp 1814—51 
LATEp 1074 +52 
LMTEp 1076 +52 
MITE Ap 11.59 +XM 
MOTEP 1051 +53 
MITECpII- 58 +54 
NCTEAP 1076 -xn 
NMTEp 9.95 -XC 
NYTEP 1072 -55 
OHTEAR1146 +.02 
PATEp 1039 + 54 
TnTEAp 1157 +53 
UtilA p 1833 . 

VATEAp 1042 +54 
Re* Funds 
Bond rs 1942-52 
GtohlPn 975-54 
Growth rvlAOB +.15 
Muirfd fpn 549 +56 
Fontaine n 1050 +.11 
ftrtii Fun d s 
AttADpx IA90 +.18 
CopApp 2543 +49 
Capiltp 1810 +73 
Fkfexrp 3053 +45 
GCDGrthP IA98 +51 
GavTRp 860 
- - 3053 + 43 

886 —51 
1043 +52 
1053 +53 
11.10 +51 

f-52 — xn 


Gtoblx 


Grwth o 

KYldp 

TFA6N 

TFNaf 

TF NY 

USGvt 


Hard* 1X75— .10 
Hllncx 11 XW — .13 
RtmODl Funds: 1 

Gtobaln 1X13 —XU i 
Growth n 1138 +X17 
CA lot 1075 
FundTrusfc 
Assresfp 1615 -39 
Groin Ip 1601 -34 
Gwth to 1*70 - 31 
incofp 1814 -XM 
MedTP. fp1174 -58 
Fmtamenln] Funds 
CAMunnp 847 — in 
NYMunnpl.ll 
US Gov n 156 —51 
GAM Funds 
Global 14898—436 
inti 19579—444 
PocSas 18471—131 
GEEfunSLS: 

Dtversfd n 14.12 -.11 
Gtobaln 17.10 -55 
income n 1178 
S&SLngnllJl — 422 
S&S PM n 3775 -46 
TOxEx 1177 -54 
Trusts n 3*01 -43 
GE Funds: 

GtobdC 1979 -54 
IrtcomeCnlUl 
inflEqDn 1*79 
StrooC 1530 -.13 
USEqDn 1642 - 30 
GE USE 1641 -30 
US EGA 1639 -30 
GlTInvsfc 

EaSpc n 21.95 —52 
TFNatln 1831 +55 
TxFrVAnllJI +55 
GT Global: 

Amerp 1877 -48 
EmMM 1647 -48 
EmMktB 1642 -49 
Europe p 1059 +57 
EtroB 1052 - 56 
GvtncA 946 — XQ 
G vines 946 —53 

GrlncAp 638 
GrincS 638 
HtfCrB 1941 +XM 
hfiJncB 1342 
HflncA 1344 —74 
HlthCr P 1970 -XB 
IntlP 1882— .16 
InflB 1077 —.15 
Japan p 1X72 -42 
LafArnG 2457 
Lot AmGB 2451 — S5 
Pacif p 1342 —73 
PocHB 1374 —71 
ShatAp 1154— .16 
Strata 1153 —.17 
TeleB 1678 — JK 
THecom 17.06 —.10 
WKJwp 1771 — XE7 
WldwB 1731 —57 
G<toe« Funds 
ABC P 1818 
Asset np 2348 -36 
ConvScpnll5» +56 
Eqlncp 1155 -.10 
GltntCPma,Qi 

1055 +53 
. 1803 -.08 

Growth np23^J +33 
SmCaaG 1754 +77 
Vtfuep 1138 -XJ6 
Grdaxy Funds: 

Asset Ail nx 11 XU +52 
CTMun 957 + 52 
EqGrthx 1*00 +58 
EatViix 1138 +.12 
EalnonnxlXS9 +56 
HiQBd 1048 —53 
InfBd 1822 —31 
IntEat n 1271 —.06 
IMAMun 977 +X» 
NYMun 1860 +XM 
STBdn 10XM 
SmCoEq 117X90 +32 
TE Bond nl 863 +54 
Gateway Ftmds 
GcvtSdn 9.96— 51 
IndxFin 1812 +.13 
SWHWG 1*76 +.19 
GnSecn 1X66 +.14 
Cartel Grom 
Erisanp 29.12 +59 
GtohFdn 1657 +50 
Gienrmde Funds 
Equity n 1X66 +.12 
IntGov n 18*0 
Intn 1347 _ 
Munlntn 1072 +XM 
SmCapn 1*85 +36 
OtreeirtA 9.90 —52 

ESSSSSSTr^ 

CapGr 1654 +37 
Giblnc 1476 — XB 
Grinc 1652 +36 
InrtEq 1748 -.11 
Munilnc 1X97 +57 
11 +.11 
— » +45 

TFEB97 


2GtobAp 1X76— -U 
ZGrowAp 1855 -.04 ' 
2ToxEx 1172 —51 
2lncPlA PX1046— XV 
IdexS 16XM -XM 

, 2FbdnApx979 — 56 

1X8* —55 IDS Group; 


BluCop 
Boodo 
CATEp 
DEI p 
Discovp 


848 +.06 
531 -51 
573 -XB 
759 -XM 
1254 * 32 


53 j EquttPIp 1179 +.19 
EXMnp 451 — XU 
Fedlncn *94 
GtobBdp XM — XB 
GtoGrp 658 —59 
Growth p 1877 -71 
HTYdTE p 450 +51 
IrtsrTE p 555 +XJ2 
Win 1828 — 59 
MgdRp 1155 -59 
MOSSP 4*1 -51 
MiCh p 5.52 -51 
MN TE P 573 +51 
Mull o 1279 -.10 
NYTEP iJC -51 
NewOp 1452 -.19 
OhlOP 542 +51 
PrecMfp 850 
Pro grasp 750 -.10 
Select p 936 —51 
Stock p 2052 +.16 
StrAgg t 1558 +33 
StrSql 956 +57 
Strlnct 677 -Ol 
StrSTt 1X30 
SlrWGl 551 —54 
TEBndp 197 +51 
UlOIncp 655 +XB 
tsi Funds 

Muni pn 1057 +XM 
NQAmp 970 — JJ6 
Trslp 954 -52 
IndOneGT 1805 — XB 
Independence Cdps 
Opportp 1151 +.13 
ShrtGvtp 953 —51 
TRBdp 959 -XII 
TRGrp 1X97 +.19 
tnvResh 455 +X32 
ImrSwOplM: 

CapGrl 1353 -.16 
OuatSIk 1*78 +70 
USGvt 950 


KPMt 
TxETrt 
ToxFrt 
Knrstooe AmencsE 
Aulncto 
CAPIF 
CPtffll 
EinA 
FtxA 
FOAA 
&OA 
GvSA 
HrEGA 
HrtCrA 
ImdA 
Omega 
PTXA 
StoA 
TxFA 
WrhfflA 
FtxBt 
FOAB t 
GTOpB t 
GvSBt 
ImdBt 


817 -XO 
1*70 -.13 
1173 -52 
.... 837 —51 

NIRsGoid 11058 -XN 
TxFBI 9.95 -52 
TptRtt 16.00 -34 
. Volt 1815 -76 
1557 . I Ma nag e rs Funds 

1653 - 511 CapAp n 2659 -AS. 

539 -51 • SoEan 3972 -52 
950 -X15 IncEq n 2757 -36 1 
87* -.16' ShoriGwn 1838 — .16 , 

2X94 -32, IISMton 1936 — .11 
953 -.19; 51 Bond 2057 -53 
899 -35. Bandn 2175—52. 

800-53; IrrtlEqn 3810—37' 

2577 -33 I Mariner r and s 
1874 -XSi Fxdlnc 9.91 
7.74 -.03 1 NY TF 11.17 -JJ3 : 

E STFxUK 950—51, 

958 -.07! TR Eq 1X94 -.15 I Nationwide Fds 

979 -51 IMarkTwtinFdc ■ NfSond 950 >1 

952 —51 1 Equity 1824 -.18 . NOtnFd 167* +.19 ' 

1X60 -.11 1 Fxdnan iaxi2 — XJS i MtGwth 1130 +.16! 

1055 -51 Muni 1021 -XB : TxFret 1072 -.01 I 

in nr iu <umW — 


InMuTAn 9.93 -31 
InfEaTA ntlXM 
MgBTAnlDJO —51 
MDlla 1877 -51 
MDITA 1077 - 51 
MBSTAn 973 
MutoTA 1877 -.03 
MUllAP 1877 -XB 
SIGvIAP *17 
SIGrtBt 4.17 
StGwTA R *17 
STlnTA n 953 —.01 
STUtlBI 953 —31 
STlnlCt 953 —31 
SClTAn 18*3 -xn 
StFTAn 9.92 — 51 
TXITAn 1814 -XM 
Value) A p 1*06 -XJ9 
VatoeTA 1459 -.10 
VAITAn 1867 -30 
VAILAP 1057 -XU 


NYTxBt i077 -X13 ; EairtB rrf 14^ +.13 
ResFBt 1736 -73 Ealncnt 1432 -.14 
STGvtB px 2*6 FISfrfl It 1X12 -.09 

SmCapB 1 1051 -70 I RStrAI 1X20 +59 
SI1B 9.88 -31| RvCfi ffn 11.43 -.10 


1896 —55, 
2816 -77 
956 —51 
2576 -59 
2351 -40 I 
9.1 B —51 ' 
17.92 -451 
1176 - 53; 
&D9 -52' 
9.96 -551 
950 -53 


lllilB px 939 — X» , 
CafTD p 11.14 -.06: 
USGvBfx 956 —.02 ' 
AMD p 1636—70' 
CoOAD 1257 -37 1 
ComTecp 953 -.07 . 
DvGDp 2150 -.08 
EuGrO 9JK -56 
GK51D 11.19— 42 

ntxdpx n.75 -xn; 

GrthD 207* +.14 , 
GflnDt 1071 —52 I 
HHneDPx 896 —51 I 
InvGOx 1070 —51 I 
NYTxDO 1078 +JD 1 
MHIDp 1049 -51 < 
STGvtD px X46 -! 

SmCapO 1030 -.19: 
St ID p 938 
USGOax 955 — 02 
939 -39 


GNMA Rn 1476 —.01 
GIAstB 159 —01 
GtobIBI 1372 — .14 


Coon 
Invesn 

S qS? V M72 


mtem 975 —.la 
Muricsix 733 -31 
WlmHi Sl 31 *3[ 
NwCcpt ITT? -J9 
Retire x 805 -31 
ScTech 15.98 -.42 
Vanguard 7J3 * 10 
IteiVal 1X11 -57 IMtOd Sernas 
StellarFd 1175 - 58 • AHAmn 7156 -.13 
USGvtriC 954 — 51 | Euron 457 +52 


3131 - A? i SKXtjrstQv .9.91.— 51 i GtRx n tM - ^6 


. -52 

GIUtBf 1*19 -31 I CATFn 1047 -.0* 
GtoGAid 18S2 — 72 i GavSI W-ll -&i 


... . UflDpx .... 

USGvInr 958 -s81 ! PonGtob n 11.14 

. 1032 -.16 1 Neu tii ' u er B er m : PappSIk 1544 -.17 

Flextncm 957 — 31 ' AMTBalnl574 • .17 I Paragon Pfc 

958 — Xll Genesis 841 -.121 Gcifc 1749 -49; 


VAMuBd 10X19 -X15 
Aontua Funds: 
GvfSecA 97* - 

GthtoA 1051 -37 
Vo£aApl809 -.15 


1864 -XB 
1894 -55 


Gucnktn 1952 -72 I 
UdMatn 1817—32 
Manhotn 1150 -31 ■ 
MUST 1871 -31 J 
NYOJCn 1079 
Partnrsn 2134 
SriSetot n 2X60 


IntBd 
LATF 
ST Gv 
VafEq 

_ I VaKJr 

45 PoitatooeAShs 
48 1 BondFd 958 


1073 —51 . 
1052 - 52 | 

1816 — xn 

1X35 -.12: 
1552 +71 


2051 
956 
9.18 —51 


uo j 

37) 

,?l 


GtCanvi 

GfTetp 


Dvrmp 1XS3 +72 
Emarthpnl246 +35 
Enerqyn 1150 +70 
Envfmn 770 +.10 
Europen 1X04 +34 
FinSvcn 1558 +75 
Goldn 870 -51 
Growth np 558 +55 
HIthScn 3658 +49 
HiYWnp 771 -XB 
bidJnconplX22 +57 
IntGovn 1X44 —52 
TntlGrn i**6 —MS 
Leisure n 2X53 +70 
PocBasn 1572 —56 
Setlncmnpi4S +51 
TxFreenpl530 +X1S 
Tech r, 2S0C -51 
TotRtn 1870 +.15 
USGqvtnp 770 +51 
UlOn 1039 -J1 
VolEq 1773 +.16 
Invpflnp 9.97 — .01 
InvPfNY IX1Q +52 
InvTrGvtBl 959 — XB 
lstefl=dnp 15.16 +.19 
JP Growth 1773 -35 
JP Income 953 +XJ1 

jpjyj IikHV 

Band n 973 —51 
DtversHdnlOTD +56 
EmeMkEdl>49 -75 


sicst 

TxFBt 

GOpCt 

TxFCI 

FTXCI 

FOACI 

GvSCt 

imdCf 

PTxFCt 

SlcO 

KIARF 


811 +52 
956 
280? 

9.96 -55 
1054 -.01 
1035 —55 
956 —31 
9.18 —31 
1175 -xn 
810 -XB 
954 
Kidder GrattR 

ARM GvA 1232 -XB 

AstAlIB 1X55 -.13 
EmMktA 1134— 35 
EmMidB 1133 —25 
GtoEqBn 1679 -51 
GtoEaCd 1654 -XB 
GftjEqA 1650 -31 
QbFxB 
GftFxA 
GvtAI 
intFlA 
KPEt 


1256 —37 

1257 —37 
1446 +52 
1252 — 51 
2457 -.18 


MurfSdA 1173 +56 
SmQtoA 1X98 +31 
LMHn 1851 +.10 
Landmorit Funds 
Baton n 1*30 +.11 
Equity n 1550 +.18 
Inttnc 944 ♦ .01 
InflEa 1250 —37 
NYTFnp 11.07 -XM 
USGvn 973 —Ml 
Laurel Funds 
Balncdn 1815 -.08 
Intmlnn 1056 —33 
S&P500 18X0 +.11 

Stock n 186 3 -.14 
L o tot tI Group: 

Equity 1*59 +30 


GtoRsnt 1252 -77 
GvPS Hn 896 —.02 
GvtSctpn 9.74— .03 
GrthBt 1538 - 33 
GfOpBt 1252 +.19 
HiYIdBfln 862 
IntGtlf 7.99 —56 
lntGtlBf 850 —36 
lflVer8RnlX38 +59 
MullB 1X74 -38 
PocGrS 1674 —M 
STGtbB 9 XB — 51 
MunArzr 11.90 -.04 
MuFLA 1032 -56 
MuGot 1146 +53 
MunHYl 1150 -51 
AAulRSA 1153 - .03 
Munlnt U52 -XB 
MuMdt 10.98 -JM 
MunAAAt 1153 -XB 
MuMn t 1150 -XH 
MunMIf 1250 +.04 
MuniMod 11893 -XB 
MuNCt 1175 -52 
MunMJI 11.11 -51 
MUNYI 1X06 -XU 
11.93 -^01 
1059 - 53 
1549 -XU 
. . 1154 —52 
SlruaBI 115* —.02 
USGvt An 9.96 +51 
UtHBfl 958 -52 
Prudential Irish: 
AOBoln 11.14 +53 
Bdn 11J7 -.03 
GthSUcn 1X76 +.11 
income In 955 — 51 
InttStkfi 1450 -36 
Stklrben 1139 -.10 


MunOhl 

MuPat 

NtMunt 

Slrudto 


Bain 1032 -X39 __ . 

EqJnc 958 -.05 UtrraBdn 955 - . Equity A 17.16 -41 | 

Gvtlnc n 958 _ ; New Alter 3133 -77 HTEqA 1*88 -56l 

IntBd n 770 _ NewCmtp ix» - 32 > urtGawA 9.91 -i 

MidCap n 1044 >30 NewUSAp 1X08 -70; totfcXsA 1343 —39' 

ST Inc it 953 - WdniosGraup: UdMatA 978 —Xll 1 

PTxFBt 1173 - 531 Stock n 1055 -.13. NiChoCn 5*14 -43 MIMuA 1074 -53 

32 VaJEart 1073 -.17 Nchlln 2735 -72 1 SmCpA 3453 +55 

3S Mothers n 15X50 -JJ5 NKhlften X55 +32 : IJSGvIA 957 — 51 

37 iMaxus Funds 1 NcM-dn 19XM -36;ParicslonaCSfas 

Equity toniijja -.12 Nicholas Applegate BalanCn 1171 +.15 
Income! 1076 * 53 BrfGthB 1*39 -.16 i BondCn 956 

Prism ton 1055 -55 CoreGttiAl450 -77 Equity Cnl7.17 *41 

MentGfh 1447 -71 CoreGrthB 1443 - 77 Gvtlnc C 946—52. 1M 

MentStrn 13.16 -.19 CoreGrthQI188 - J6 HYEaCnlATB -56 ! Pitown Fbads 

MeroerPd otOJO -.12 EmoGrA 1X56 *76 irrtGvtCn 9.90 - 1 AmGcvp 855 

Meridian n 2630 -.17, EmsGrB 1X53 -76 intiCn 1349 —39 

Merra Lynch: EmoGrQull275 - 74 ! UdNttC 977 -51 

AmertnA 957 —36 IncGrA 1550 —.17 1 Ml MnC 1074 -JM 

AifiRAP 958 — 511 IncGrB 15.12 -.16 MuBdC 1046 -53 

AZMA 1058 -XM. VWGrfi 1541 -39. SmCopC 2473 +55 

1X14—51: WWgr 1549 -JBiPomBaln 17.13 +.12 
2195 -.18 ' Nomura nf 1852 — XB ‘Parnassus 3*79 +54 
971 -55 ■North Am Fuads ipasodeaa Grease 
115? -.06, AsfAflp 1150 -57 BctRtrv* 2159 +.16 
1*31—101 GrowthA 1811 +.14 
1546 -.16' NmvSO 1736 -.W 
1X95 -.19 Paxw»1dnl34l +.U, 

958 -51 [PavsonBln 1236 *57 
-41 -PeHccn 1X24 -31 I 
-XM PenCapA 814 -30 


Inttlndx 


BdA 
BOSVIA 
CAMA 
CalMnA 
CopFdA 2842 +31 
Consult P 1X63 —56 
CpFGA 831 -51 
CJnvGdA 1153 
CdITA 
DevCap 


GIGrp 
Gwth P 
Gr men 

_ USGvtp __ 

1155 —51 iNelrTvGrn 2574 
1816 —50 J NelnvTr n 1056 


1532 —57' Norwest Feeds “ 'PAMuntp 1136 -53 
1535 -52' AdUST 956 -51 | Pwfarm ap c e Fds I 


IrrflEq 

wsc 

SmCap 

SpEq 

StrnYd 

LebenNY 


1X07 
1145-33 
1812 -72 
1810 +35 
9.95 —31 
776 -53 


WtEqtvnllL57 +.12 
ST Bond n 954 —JO 
SmaflCon1157 +32 
SNEqlyn 11,16. +.14 
Jack s o n Nanoeak 
Growth 11.18 +.11 
10.13 +52 
1042 +54 
1053 -36 


TaxEx 

TotRtn 


17.19 +41 
AmGoWr2273 +54 
Auto r 2554 —77 
BioteCh r 2896— .16 
Brdcstr 207 +45 
Brokerr 1890 -.15 
Otemr 3245 +48 
Camnr 29.12 +73 
CanPrdr 1576 +.13 
CsIHaur 20.17 +41 
DIAeror 1947 +54 
DevCom r2058 +.19 
Electrr 1897 +43 
Energy r 1731 +58 
EngSvcr 1177 +72 
Envlror 1179 +74 
RnSvcr 5171 +33 
Food r 3170 +74 
Heafthr 6X63 -^09 
HomeF 2577 +74 
IndEqpr 20.92 +33 
indMatr 2X14 +72 
Insurr 19.19 
LNsrr 4559 +55 
MedDNr 2079 +71 
NtSGasr 9J7 +46 
Paoerr 1959 — X» 
PrecMelrl7.18 +70 
RegBrtcr 18.17 +40 
Rehflr 


Fortress tovst 
AdHBI 978 +51 
Bondr 951 +51 
GISJm 690 
Munlncl 1053 +52 
OHFortp 1137 -JM 
Utflr 1X83 
44 Wofl Eq 866 +.13 
Fanan Fends 
lnvBnd 1075 +51 
InvSJfc 235 
MEBnd 1660 +XM 
TaxSvr 7049 +XM 


Balnp 933 +.11 
BtueOe»np886 +.12 
Discvp 2X22 +78 
Frrtrnp 2849 +73 
Gavsec 979 
Grwth np 1372 + 30 
Peosprtn laJl —50 
Spedpn 818 +31 
WldwGrpl758 -ill 
Fountain Squrae Fds 
Brflancsd 1058 +.10 
GovtSec 959 
MitKtoP 1075 + 75 
QuafBd 9.90 
QucXGr 1053 +.12 

Rmkfia Grain; 

AGE Fund 255 +51 
AdUSx 948 _ 

ARS 956 —52 
ALTF 1151 +53 
AZTF 1177 +52 
Bannvx 2X52 +.13 
CAHYBd 10XM +JI1 
Cailns 1113 +.06 
CAtoterm1043 + 53 
CdfTFr 733 +52 
COTF 1159 +53 
CTTF 1154 +52 
CvtSecx 1253 +.10 
ONTC 959 +.16 
Equity 7.12 +.11 
Ettfncx 1*15 +56 
FIST ARS 957 —02 
Fedlnterm'66* +53 
FetfTx 1107 -XM 
FLTFIn 953 -55 
FLTF 1140 +JJ2 
GATF 1150 +XQ 
GtGvlncx 892 —58 
GAM 1X60 —16 
Gold 1539 +.19 
Growth 1868 +30 
ie.ir Tjm., HYTF 11.10 +52 
2572 +42 1 HIMuBd 1077 +53 


AtSGv 9.91 
GovAa 9.92 
StirtTF 1050 +51 
ST Gov 950 —.01 
GoveifRnds 
DvtpBd 881 —06 
EmsMk 17.12 • 
GKSvtn 974—53 
InttEa 1250 —19 
PfcSto 9.16 — 41 
SmCos 1774 +77 
GvtEqtvn 2*01 +33 
GradMen McDonald: 
EsJVDl Pn217S +.18 
GovtoCP 1197 - __ 
OHTFP 1196 +55 
OppVolp 1898 +70 
GHMNTE 1812 +51 
GHNafTE 1073 + 53 
Grestspmgl*38 +30 


AstAItoc 11.18 +59 
GBGlrtl 1X27—07 
Bandn 1X07 —51 
POrfcAv 2978 +46 
Stock n 3602 +48 
TaxEx 947 +XM 
US Govt 1811 —52 
HTfns£qpBClX17 +58 
HTMpFl qxl6ia —54 
HonOnCota 9.11 
HoaavertnvFdK 
BJOXSr 1043 +57 
ST Gv 97* —51 
SmCPGr 1081 +.14 
US Govt 957— 51 
Hcrtxx Funds 
Bond 1 1-07 +52 
CopApp n 1737 +.17 
Grwthn 1X56 +70 
tatln 2427 —25 
lr«Gf 1836—26 
ShtDurn 9.12 
Vcduen 1X18 +.19 
HeamandFdK 
USGvtP 1604—05 
Value P 2533 +37 
W? TxF 1601 —01 
HeraoteiPund; 

BjtoVI 1824 +55 
LAirvVd 1140 —37 
NAnrGrin16C5 +J31 
PdBVBl 1617 —13 
WldBd 977 +JB 
Heritage Funds 
CopApp P IS. IB +32 
DiVlncP 1033 +51 
IncGfp 1177 +.11 
LMGoVP 972 
SmCopSp1733 +78 
MgbMartc Fuads 
BrPancen 9.M +5? 
Bcndn 1045 
GovTBdn 948 
Growth n 1661 +X« 
IncGrrt 1602 +.13 
InaoEq 1154 +.17 
SpGrEd n 1*97 +37 


Brtanccdnl243 -JM 
Eidwprn 2XX +33 
FedTXEx ii896 -52 
Bxlncn 9-ffl —02 
Fund n 1979 +54 
Grttitnc 1531 +55 
InJGvt 5.01 —01 
Mercury 1332 -.10 
SiTmSdn 197 - 

Tteenn 2577 +.19 
Vertrn 5627 +51 
2856—24 

n 1108 +51 


CATEf 1156 +54 
DiscvBI 955 +39 
Growth B 1742 +39 
IIAcore 1117 +.10 
LTGvAp 859 
MATEf 1150 +53 

SSS :s 


STStrckB 858-52 
SpdEAp 1847 +37 
Sp^EBp 1678 +5 
SPOPCA 868 +X* 
SpcOpsS 856 +57 
Strtncfp 771 
TaxEx to 1076 +53 
J Hancock Fteedm: 
AvTedi 1170 +70 
EnvmAp 899 
GUnBt 9.11 —05 



RoBkBI 2685 +39 
J Hancock Sc 


AdiA 

4chBt 

SaJAp 


1X33 +.16 
T237 +.16 
1055 +57 
1664 +56 
BondAfp 1809 —.01 
ImrAp 1554 +.1J 
IftvBp 1805 +.13 
USGvA P 9.96—01 
USGvBt 954—02 
J&VB« 1373 +59 
KSMun 1248 +54 
KSIMunLt 1X29 +53 
Koulrnainr 171 +.10 
Kemper Funds 
AdtGowx 841 -53 
BtoeOw 13XM +33 
Cod 740 +53 
Divlncox 879 —03 
EnvSvc T335 +XM 
FL TX 1037 +JM 
Gtoincx 891 —06 
Grill 1*16 +38 
HrYietdx 1818 — JM 
Income x 6X5 —54 
WfFund 1075 —12 
Mun®dxl615 —01 
NYTF 1698 +53 
OHTF 942 +54 
Retire! 1179 +55 
Refire? 1331 +55 
R«ttre3 1066 +55 
Rettre4 974 +55 
RddraS 876 +52 
ST Glob x 731 —03 
SrrCpEq 670 + 59 
Tedmoi 11.11 +.18 
TXTF 1625 +53 
TotRetm x 9.92 +JM 
USGvt x 889—55 
Xniperlnvsk 
Divine lx 632 — 52 
GVilx 7.18—53 
Gwth f 18X16 +70 
WYldtx 834 - 
STGitx 7.17- 
Shtlntt 823 
SmCpEq till! +.15 
TolRet tx 1*32 +.1* 
Kemper Premier: 

Dtvin x 823 —53 
GvtX 7.18 —04 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


BELGRAVIA 

ORCHIDS 

UK 071 589 5237 


FERRARI 

LONDON ESCORT AGBKY 
MAJOR QBXT CARDS ACOPTGD 

071 589 8200 


TABfTHA’S 

LONDON - PARIS ESCORT SBVKE 

071 266 0586 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 12) 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


• e nuas mvkm 
. p** cor&occBpted 
For Zimdt cdMB7 / 63 83 32 
Otow city: Ad INTI +35 2/49 42 97 


50PWSHCATS wn 

MA1E A RMA1E ESCORT 
a gw*> UK 071 588 9298 


INTERNATIONAL ESCORTS 

Senkc AnxfaMr Yroridw>de 
n* 2l2-r6S-!W6 Nt nr Ycr*. USA 
Atagdr Gvdt Cords & Cheda Aaxptd 


CHBSEA ESCORT SBtVKE. 


51 

Tel: 071-584 


IPfdcn SW1 
18 yets* 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MISS GENEVA 6 PARIS 

Eswl Agency 346 00 89 oeefa cords 


TOKYO 

* TOP FOR TOP 

EU/ JAPAN Escort & Guida Agency. 
TE. TOKYO (B5 3508 - 1S98 


'••PRETTY WOMAN 
• ' * G0CVA - PARS * * • 
Now Exdudve Boad Swwcb 
an 3+1 99 61 - - - ' 


A TOUCH OF CLASS 

SOPHSTICATED • ESCORT ■ SERVICE 
TH. LOGON 071-372-7852 
MO8UE-0B36 61 8 1 20 


WKTO — ESCORT SERVICE 
Majorae* ter* ooceptod 
T *l dm 3436*598 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


MUNICH • WELCOME 
ESCORT & GUCE AGENCY. 
PLEASE CALL D89 - 91 23 1* 


...... DISCREET** *• 

TOP * QUALITY • BCCKT • S8MCE 
LONDON - D7 1 -935-4533 


ZUBOtlBWC 

& Baxt Service 
Zurich 01 / 383 08 56. 


WBSaDORF * COOGIC * BOWI 


&axt and Guxfc Sflrwca. 
Tel: 0711-435 06 B7. 


YVETTE LOdON 
PrrvcXe Etcori Swks. 

7 dnyt/ r waiQL T tL API 493 2784 


PARIS « LONDON* 

BEGANT 8 BXJCATH) * EXCLUSIVE 
Escort SenmB Ladgn {711 394 5145 


ZURICH / BERN / BASEL 
Escort Service 

T«L 077/88 G6 60. 077/88 06 7D 


TO OUR READERS IN FRANCE 

JJ’s never been easier to subscribe 
anq save with our new toll free service. 
Just call us today at 05 437 437. 


ESCORTS~S~GinDES 


TOKYO EXECUTIVE 
Escort Servica. Cnsrft pank 
Tet 0X34797171) 


OBflUMBrs 

cert sarwa, Ou«& gu t 26 the Howe, 
Hdfand Tel: +31 (IETJ1 360799L 


■RANXRJXT RON DUSSHDORF 
diqreas. Esaxt Sennce, 7 days 


ESCORf SBMCE Dmnd . 

fleme phone 071 22 3314 Lando* 


> ZURICH * SUSAN 

Es c o rt Service 
Tet 01 7 381 9948 


TAJ MAHAL Engbh, Ewopeat, hxfan, 

OrwPa Escort Service. Credil cards. 

12+ettirftt. LOWQN Q71 Mi 4105 


AMSTERDAM 2000 * 

Esc or t Strata 

W 20 691 1036 


VIENNA* PARIS * MILAN • ZURICH 

Euraoartua Inti Escort + Tro wL 

Serwce. Cofi Yjama +43-1-310 63 19. 


V1INNA'SIZ8G*ZU0CH*PRAHA 

■FRBRX.Y, ELEGANT, H5UCATH3, 
Supreme Escort + 43 1 5321132 ■ 


PARIS * SOUTH Of FRANCE • 

LONDON • ESCORT SBMCE 
TH_- LONDON 71 394 5121 DARY 


CHAMPA GNE E SCORT SHYICE 

Eng fch /Gyfcbftn. 7 days T2ravl2cm 
0BTtf8 7421 or 0B31 4W7P3 


CAfEAUIAIT 

PRIVATE ESCORT SEV1CE 
C&ITRAL LOhCON 0B1 968 1645 


CHARLENE BRAM5 AW BEAUTY 

LOriDON PRIVATE ESCORT SSMCE 
CAU.0T1 -3*5-1831 


LeebPern 1054 +58 
Legg Masocc 
AmorLdplXll +.11 
GbiGavt PX9.93 — J72 
Gvftndnpl619 —01 
HIYldpX 1*86 -XB 
LnvGrnp 1058 — 51 
MdTFp 1652 +JB 
PATFp 1818 + JJ7 
Splnvnp 2X21 +35 
Tid=rlntp 1X19 +55 
TotRstnp 1*12 +57 
Varrrnp 1930 +35 
LsxtogtoaGac 
CnvSecn 1*16 +.17 
CUH 1X92 +.12 
GNMAn 814 -51 
Gtobaln 1*02—08 
Goldfdn 647 +XM 
Gtfilncn 1631 +.15 
S3 Govt n 955 -52 
SKB *31 —JO 
Stlnv 24! -X>9 
TEBdn 1646 +56 
WldEm 1X51 —49 
UwrfyFarrtfy: 
AmLdr 1559 +32 
CaoGrA p 1658 +.16 
EalncAp 1141 +56 
EqincCt 1141 +57 
FTfefn 1883 -30 
FTWIx 1684 —20 
HUncBd 1133 +53 
MnSc 1144 +51 
LISGvtCp 601 
USGvSecA 8J11 -51 
UtilFd 1255 —53 
UtBFdCt 1X06—52 
LBserty Ftamctot 
Gthlncx 1697 +XJ9 
InsMunixHLAl +XH 
TF Band xl049 —51 
US Gov x 951—06 
Utflx 1136—02 
LTMFIVp 958 +51 
LmtTrtnp 1051 — Xll 
Lindner Funds 
Dtvn 2745 +34 
Fund n 2*38 +33 
Utiln 1132 +X0 
Loomis Saytac 
Bandn 1142—52 
GtoBdn 1036 -JJ3 
Growth n 1X33 +J1 
Grain 1X98 
IntEqn 1332— 54 
SmCcvn 1*59 +31 
Lord Abbrth 
AIBHdp 1078 +57 
Bond3ebp947 +JB2 
DevetCthplOBB + 34 
Eql990p 1*35 +.11 
FdVoJup 1111 +JI7 
GEqp 1X41 —51 
GUncp 856 —54 
GovtSec P 245 
Natl F ir 431 + XB 
TnxFTD 1138 +53 
TFCTp 1632 +54 
TxFrCalplOYl +54 
TFFLp *93 +52 
TFMOp 622 +53 
TFNJp 532 + 52 
TaxNY p 1133 +XU 
TFTXp 10.12 +52 
TFPAp 557 +.04 
TFHIp 552 +JB 
TFMI *97 +52 
TFWAp 551 +52 
VotuAppplXOJ +31 
US Govt 441 

Luttaren Brib 
Bro+BYd 934 +51 
Fund 18X19 +.18 
Income 848 + 51 
Muni 846 +.03 
OpoGr 1089 +.18 
MAS Funds 
Balanced nll33 + J36 
EmerGrn?811 +31 
Equity n 2150 +.19 
Fkdlnlln 11.1* —01 
Fxdlncn 1140 —XT 
GtFxhl 1044 +51 
HY Sean 942 — 01 
InttEa n 15.00 —15 
UdDurFlni045 - 
MtoBkFc 1632 — xn 
MunFxJ 1042 +J» 
SefEqn 1607 +32 
Se8=ln 1046 
SefVal n 1340 +30 
SmCpVl n 1627 +41 
SpRn 1117 — 51 
Value n 1X63 +.19 
MPSc 

MITAp 1154 +.12 
MIGAp 1U1 +.11 
BondAp 1X16 +51 
EmGrA p 50JB) +45 
GrOfJA p 114* +.18 
GvUAp 839—41 
GvMoAp 865—51 
GvScAp 949 —01 
rtJncAp 839 +51 
InOaA p 7.96 
LtdMAp 736—01 
RschAp 1*06 +39 
SedAp 1337 +.18 
TotRAP 1X33 +55 
LffllAp 744 +51 
VaAlAp 1043 +.13 
WoGvAp 1146 
WoGrA 1898 +56 
WoTotA p 1694 —53 
MuSdA 1697 +55 
MuMA 958 -xn 
MuUA 745 +42 
MUALAP16S3 -XB 
MUARAP 9.96 +XB 
MuCAAp 543 + 53 
MuFLA P 1051 +XM 
MuGAA p 1669 -JM 
AAUMAAP1131 -55 
AAu»lOApll31 +XM 
MuMSAp 946 +53 
MuNCApllJO +54 
MuNYA pl039 -JM 
MuSCAp 1X12 +54 
MUTNAp 1651 +XJ3 
MUVAA Pll4B +JM 
MUWVAP1I40 +XM 
QtaGBr 1*32 +34 
BandB ill* - 
EmGrBt 2034 -43 
GotdBf 87? -52 
645 - 

949 —51 
539 +51 
860 

1896 +.« 
1336 -.18 
1133 *55 
JB 


DrtaiA 
EuroA 
FedSecAp?32 —51 1 
FLAAA 10.11 +55 
_ ' 1876 -51 

1X55 -57 
9.63 —OS 
1699 +52 
1342 — XB 
1812 *33 


FdFTA 

GJA1A 

GffldA 

GtCVA 

GfHdA 

GiHsA 

QUtA 

GrIRA 

HeafthA 

Insrinp 

lnt«qA 

MIMuA 


EqConp 11.93 -.12 
Ealnsn 11.93 -.12 
InFICo 1031 —41 
InFltit 1Q31 —41 
MCpGH 1617 +31 
STFICpn 959 —51 
STF1 In 939—01 


AsfiGovA 935 +51 
COTF A 931 +52 
GvflncTr 945 -51 
GvtlncA 9S -51 
InasmeTr 1055 — XB 
incomeA 160* —52 
TF incA 930 -xn 

.w... ■ _ . TFtncT 930 -32 1 Perm Port FUnds: 
1X99—13 ValuGrA 1643 +35: PermPI n 1742 -.10 
19.12 +48! VaWGrT 1840 +.19 TBiBit 6497 -JM 
*13 + XM > Nuveen Funds [ VBandn 5*62 -XB 

947-52' CAfns 1643 -59 iPerttCGn 1X86 +.15 
1048 +56! Philo Furelx 875 -.11 
1811 +XJ7 
1044 +56 
1609 -55 
1623 +55 
974 -JM 
1032 -56 
9.14 +53 

1030 -XM 
1039 -XM 
1048 -JM 
1636 -55 
1617 -56 

1031 +55 


CA Vat 
FLVti 
InsMun 
MDVal 
MAtns 
AAA vat 
MiVal 


1142 -56 
_ 10J0S -53 

MNMuA 1651 +X>2l 
LatAmArlifil —49! 

MnlnsA 819 -53 > 

AAunLMA 9.93 -l 
AAutoTrA 1611 -53: . 

MNottA 1647 -53 1 MunlSd 
NJMA 1689 +52 NJVal 
NYAAnA 1143 -XB NY (ns 
PocA 22.18 —31 NYVal 
PA AAA 1132 — JM 1 OHVdl 
PtwxA 1X90 -.131 PAVal 
SpVlA 1854 -.1*1 VAVal 
StrOvA 1X95 -.17 lOVB Pundae 
STGIAP 845—01 CapAppAUdO -30 1 
TechA 545 -XB I EmGrthAiQ44 +.16 
TX MA 1668 -51' GpvtSecAn944 —51 > 
WUIncA 9XL5 — JO iCokHalln 1432 - 38 
AdlRB 949 _ oefcmric 

AmerlnBt 947 —56 lOakmnH 

AZAABT 1658 -XUfOberwefe 2X79 
BalBt 1232 — 02 lOceanTEp 1664 -51 


Basvrat 2X71 +.17 
CBMAnBt 1141 +56 
CAMS 9.71 -55 
COPFdBI 2739 +30, 
CSHISt 832 -52) 


Offithyn 938 -53 

OWIrK 1042 —19 

OldDomin 1979 + 56 
Olympic Tnm: 
Balanced nl 646 +.11 


□nvGdS 1143 _| Ealncnt 1615 -54 

CplTBt 1145—01! bitln 1746 —58 
DrogBp 1816 — 47 ! One Group: 

EuroBt 1*70 -52; Aset AC P 1035 -JJ5 
FedSecflt 972 -51 ! BtoCEOA 1X34 -.10 
FLMBt 1611 +.051 DSCVOIA 1354 +.13 
FdFTBt 1545 -51 | EatndxA 1X31 +.13 


FdGrBI 

GiAJBI 

GSdBt 

GtCvBt 

GiRsBt 

GtUtBI 

GrIRBt 

HedlhBt 


1610 +57 
1X41 +XI7 
943 -06 
1153 +51 
1656 +33 
1X94 —13 
18)7 +44 
339 -56 


OHMBt 

P0C8I 

PAAABt 

PhnxBt 

STGmr 

SpVBT 


1 1147—06 
1138 —54 
LotAmB 11877 —40 
AAAAABI 1667 +53 
AAUAuBI 1055 +53 
MNAAB t 1651 +52 
MnlnsBI 819 - JM 
AAnUOBt 9.93-51 
MutntB 1611 +53 
MNattBt 1046 - 53 
NJMBt 1689 -XB 
NYMnBf 1144 +53 
NCMBt 1040 +54 
1071 +52 
2130 -31 
1132 -54 
1346 +.13 . 
845—01 l 

1614 +.14 

StrOvB I 1X93 +.18 
TertlBt 636 +53 
TXAABt 1668 +51 
UttlnBt 952 —ID 
WtdlncBt 955— LB 
MemmaoFds 
AstAJInf U71 +52 
CdpApp I10J6 +54 
FtexBdlh 1036 
Grin 11.13 +54 
MdLHeSMeSb 
COpApA 1692 +37 
C O p A p B 1047 +36 
CapApC 1036 +36 
EqincA 1151 +31 
EoincC 11-90 +30 
EqlrrvttA 1X57 +.13 
EqtovC 1340 +.13 
GovSecA 733 
KilnCA 659 +52 
HHncS 857 +51 
bdE«p 1045 +57 
IntiFxin f 854 — 5S 
MgdAstB 937 +.10 
AAgdAstA 940 +.10 
AAgdAstC 941 -.10 
RschBalC 157 -XB 
TaxExA 8XM +52 
TxExS 854 +53 
MIMUnc 1078 + 52 


AdJUSGvi 956-51 
Govtp 1053 
lntGv P 1680—02 
LeshUrOA 1044 +55 
LeshTsvA 9J» —01 
OHTF 1112 +55 
TFlrdp 1693 +51 
U5GOVLM 817 —51 
tonerta 1639 +46 
MonettAAC 1334 + 37 


21.18 —.12 
2676 +34 
2148 —51 
21.17 —14 
3876 +34 
2256 +.12 
936 —14 
2147-42 
20.11 —11 


-51 


GvMgBt 
GvScBI 
HRnBI 
kjfrrCt 
AAuBdB 
Sects t 
TotRBf 
WOEaBt 1886 
WoGvB 1142 _ 

WoGrB 1894 +X>8 
WoToIB 1691 — <M 
MutnBl 878 +53 


FxJnl p 
GwfWp 
OhTflp 
FxlnT 
GrwIhT 
InEqT 
AAtOBk* 

Oh TFT 
SIBdT 

MortfrGid p 1026 
MonitrSlp 1731 
Moctfgomery Fd* 
EmoAAkt 1*49 —19 
GtotoCom 1542 -30 
GtobOpcnl*41 —22 
Growth n 1549 + 39 
1n5>EAAkt 14652 —79 
(ffHSmCtBJW.14 —09 
ShDurG I 957 + 51 
SmCcpn 1861 +32 
Morg Stan Fds 
AstanGrA 15.18 —65 
AsianGB 15.12 —63 
1638 -.12 
1231 +.12 


EmergEq 948—18 
Fxlnan 1635 — XB 
InBmCp 0165? —58 
AAunffld 1671 -X12 
MroK»Sop 1349 +.15 
MoniStan texft: 
AaCtryn 12.09 -.11 
AsiretEq n2045 — 92 
Bcrf 948 -XM 
EmGr 1677 +30 
EmMW 1751 - 
EmAAkDbt 9X5 
EQGrn 1232 -.12 
Fxdlnc TOJS +51 
GEqtv 1342 +33 
GIFXinn 1141 —XU 
hSYSdn 1690 

mttsen 1868 —51 
LnKEq 1*96 +56 
RedYIdn 9.93 — XH 
VafueEqntXi? +.14 
SCVatn 1133 +.14 
AAutdenkmc U Skg +31 
ArtUtrCA TF I82S +57 
AAmAUGB 1150 +.14 
IWutIBnft 1845 +.09 


Beacon n 3X36 *41 
Diseovrv 1X44 +31 
Ouatfdn 2749 +47 
---7-»I49 


Bdincn 937 +56 
Siklncn 1044 +.12 
SUcGrwn 1147 +.14 
StkApn 1853 +33 
MlMLfC Funds 
AsStAB 1353 +.16 
FxcHncm ia)2 - 
jnvl 1735 +37 
MtgSecs 1820 +53 
AAMPrGtn iai7 +.17 
MMPxtnf n *72 — 51 
MSBF4n 1746 +33 
AodcenzJeGrp: 
AcO&jAo 975—02 
AmerFdpIXM +31 
CAMunpT824 +56 
Canada 1655 +36 
FDdncP 1607 * JJ1 
Gtobtri 1X79 -XU 
UdAAup 1079 + 54 
NYMunp 956 + 53 
NalMup 953 +JD 
N Amerp 754 + 54 
Mpdanztohry: 


EquItytP 1145 +.16 
FXdlncI P 1041 —03 
OHTElP 1671 +54 
EqUrtyR Pi 347 +.16 
FXdfncR P1667 — XD 
OHTERP1047 -JO 
NDTscFrtmOTt -51 
NWML Norihstm 
HlYkSA 5JV 
IncGrA 1043 +JS 
AflutBA 455 
NYLtafflFds: 

EAFE 1273 
Bond 952 —51 
GrEa 1547 *37 
IndxSd 1047 
hldxEq 1456 +.14 
AAultA 1170 +XJ? 
STBd 1078 —51 
ValEa lias +35 
NlUnd 1X77 -.14 
Nations Fund: 
AdRHAp 944—51 
AdIRITAn 954 —51 
Baud 1172 -.12 
BOfTAn 1176 -.12 
CoGTAn 11,94 +32 
DtoUCT 1645 
DtvITAn 1045 
EmGTA 11.97 +.IB 


GvArmAn953 
GvBdAp 977 +51 
IrxEaA 1X68 +.11 
IncameSd 953 +51 
IntFid 1610 -XH 
IntTFA 1040 -54 
IntlEaAn 1X47 +55 
LgCOGr 1178 -.14 
LgCaVal 11.95 +58 
LfVoLA 1659 _ 

OHMUA 1692 +54 
SmCoGr 1777 -30 
TFBdA 9.90 -53 
lllGorco 9.97 -XQ 
lllCcrNC 1C36 +51 
Oppen h e im er F d. 
AssetAp 1X17 +.10 
CATE A pi 643 +56 
ChoHYP 1X00 _ 

Dfccf-d P 3945 -AS 
EqincA P 10X17 +56 
Bjlncflt 1052 + 55 
GffitoP 2236 -36 
GIGrp 1S31 —.10 
GtobErtVPll.U -.15 
Gtobo(Ap3738 —29 
GtobIBI 3894 —30 
Galdp 1433 +.16 
GvfSecA P11LB7 —41 
HiYldA 106 -XC 
HiYkJBr 1430 — 03 
UtsTEAP 1656 + 54 
InlrTEP 1*64 +51 
ItwGrAp 1677 
MnStCA 1X25 +57 
M5lnctSrAZL23 +48 
AMglncA 1X76 —51 
NYTaxA P1X66 — 04 
NYTxSttl 1247 —04 
Opeen 1138 +.13 
PATEAP12J2 
SpedAP 2882 +47 
StrlncAP 555 —07 
SlrtntSl 556 —42 
SJBSTIAP *73 —01 
StlnGrAP 5.15 *44 
StrlnvAP *95 —42 
TareetP 2873 +40 
TkFrBI 956 +51 
TxFrAp 956 
Timep 1886 -35 
TatRtAp 893 -.11 
TatRtBfn 887 +.10 
USGvtp 948 —01 
VatStAP 1471 +.14 
OwftamfBqtea 
AstAIA 1X02 +58 
CATFA 1159 -54 
MuIncA 1678 +56 
SfratGrA 1*03 +.18 
ST Govt 51 47 +41 
USGvtA 1041 —51 
VRG A 959— XB 

PBHGGrn 1646 +37 
PFAMCoFdK 
Bdan 1043 +57 
CapApn 1*06 +.11 
OvLownllM +30 
EmergMkl 1*95— 24 
EnhEqn 11.98 +.1? 
Eqlncn 1173 +.13 
totln 1100 —06 
MstBdn 9.90 —01 
MidC® 1*77 +30 
SmCpG 2050 +32 
SmCpV 1348 +43 
UttSIkn 938 — 56 
PiMCOFmbc 
TorRern 1043 -JM 
TRHI 930 —01 
LowDurrtl609 
LDtl 1041 —01 
ShnrtTn 9.96—01 
Frgnn 1036 
Gtobatn 9.94 -XH 
H1YM 1053 
Grwth n 1*46 +33 
LTUSGn 1031 +41 
PNC Funds 
Balances 1X65 -JM 
Batonc 1X65 +49 
1618 +.10 
10.17 +.10 
1134 +.17 
1131 +.10 
946— XB 
1612 

946 —02 
10.12 

1X31 +42 
1331 +52 


BofanFd 15.92 +.0B 
CafTxEp 1334 +XM 
CopApp 19X16 +.11 
CvFdSer 1832 +.15 
EqfyORP 772 - 57 
Growth 2140 +.12 
HBYiekt 9.10 —51 
InGrAp 954 -53 
InGrBI 952 +53 
inti 1X71 —07 
AAuffnAp 1X95 —01 
MuiFlBp 1X93 —01 
StocfcFd 1340 -.15 
TE Bd 11.19 -XO 
TotRetp 1542 +58 
USGvB 948 -51 
, WWOPPX1663 —04 
2*12 -43 Purport Fd& 

1S35— XQ' Bandn 1Q.X6 — 51 
TEBondnll48 +J» 
EmgMEaN47 -35 
Equity n 1941 +34 
CopApp r.2343 +47 
inflEon 1135 +.12 
PilBaxEG 1X68 -46 
FQsrimGip; 

ARS III 732 — 01 
ARS IV 735 
AUS1-A 75S 

7 » - 

ARS LA 
ARS II 
AdiUS 
Adi US 1 1 
AUSIII 

comip 

GNMA 
FRYldP 
MagCap 
STMMII 
ShrfTrp 


AxSApx 1037 —03 
AsksAp 1X88 —ID 
BiGvAp *82—41 
AZTE 9.10 +52 
CATxAp 848 +52 
Convert p 20X13 -.13 
CpAT 4339 +53 
DtvGrp 945 +.12 
DvrtaAp 1X57 —01 
EnR&Ap 1435 + 38 
EqtnAp 880 +56 
EuGrAp 11.93 — 51 
Fetilnp 9.92 +54 
FLTxA 9.08 +JJ2 
GeaAp 1347 +57 
GtGvAp 1*50 —07 
GIGrAp 9J8 — XU 
GrtnA p 1342 -49 
HlthAp 2677 +.16 
HiYdA px 133? —57 
HYAdp* 1644 —01 
tocmApx 750 — XM 
InvA p 840 +.10 
MnlnAp 696 -54 


MoTxJI 

MITxllP 

MudAp 

MnTtdlp 

NJTxAp 


933 + 52 
9.14 + JT2 
9.00 +53 
899 -52 
9.07 -53 


7.13 
7.16 
736 —01 
7.01 —01 
7.13 
7.12—01 
735 _ 

1X33 +51 
645 +52 


NwOpAp 2SJ4 -71 
NYTxAp 943 -43 
NYOoAp 879 -51 
OTCEo 11.98 +34 
OhTxllp 952 + 53 
PATE 933 + 53 
TxExAp 944 -xn 
TFUlAp 1543 +56 
TFHYA 1446 *52 
TFHYBt 1446 -52 
TFhlBI 1554 +56 
Texas P 9.11 +JJ2 
USGvA p 1352 + 51 
UtilA 0 942 —51 

VstaAp 746 +.10 
1X21 +30 
1036— XB 
1343 —II 
*82 -51 
847 -52 

19.95 +.11 

Dvrlrfit 1X54 —51 
GeoBI 1X63 +58 
957 +52 
944 —06 
1X54 +59 

2639 +.16 

HiYWBIX 1X1 B —47 
Incomes lx*9B —54 
InvBt 834 +.10 
MATxBt 933 +52 
MuraBt 899 +52 
NJTxBt 956 +52 
NwOppBt2575 + 49 
NYTxBI 952 -51 
“ 11.90 +33 

954 *54 
1199 -51 
948 - 

741 -XW 
1X01 +30 


VorAp 

ArSB tx 

AsiaBt 

BfGvBt 

CATxBt 

CortvBt 


FLTxBI 

GKVBf 

GrtnBt 

HlthBt 


OTCBI 
TxExBf 
USGvBt 
UfilBt 
VWOBf 

VoyBt 

1X75 +34 Quart ituflve Group: 
753 _ BastForGr 1034 _ 

. 675 _ BosfGrwlnWJ? +.16 

Rmdsc BasNum01693 +46 

BalGrAn 1673 +56 BasNum0175B +48 
EtoAgAn 1290 +38 Quest For Value: 
EOGrAn 11.13 +54 CATE 1043 +54 
EfltnA 11.13 +.10 Fund " 1X24 +.16 


NtriF Bn 10.16 +^ 
lOQQr 1X05 +.15 

SrrFBdPlO-M +« 

SmCrtd* 0^ +30 
ScotWidl 1450 —59 
Scudderftonte 
Balanced n 1X30 + .09 
ComTT 1037 -M 
CapGtn 21.12 -.48 
DSSopn35.W* | 56 

EmMhlftol46— 42 
GNMAn 1441 +52 
Glotai n 2476 —53 
GHmCo 16^ —03 
Goldn 1343 +.19 
GrwIncn 1747 -.14 
Incomen 1341 - 02 
Intematt n4343 —34 
IntlBd n 1X99 —10 
LatAmrr 2141 —47 
MA Tx n 1X58 -54 
MedTFn H52 -54 
MMB 849 +.02 
NYTxn 1072 +.04 
OHTxn 1104 +JD 
PA Tax n 1342 * 55 
PacOpps n 16J 2 —51 
QualGrn if33 +.18 
ST Bond n 1176 —03 
STGlbln 11.18 — 53 
TxFHYn 1199 +42 
Virtue n 1X10 +.11 
ZerSOOOn 1238 


StarestMu p 10*5 +52; GidShn 
State Bond Gnx ; Growth n 

*SnST 7.90 -.11 
Dlversl«x935 - 54 
Progress IXI7 -56 
TaxEx 1681 +52 

, (JS Gov p 5.07 +5? 

1633 -52 IstFnrmFd*: 


X56 

- *96 -.06 

I £22 ixs6—ii_ 

1 ReoEstn 11 06 - SsH 
| toTrGytn 9.90. 

USTxFrnll43 +jis 
, WrtdGltfnr74J -25 
lyatForon 9.73 


Baton n 31.48 -30 | Virtue UaeFd: 

Gwth n 2247 +35 AcSCvn 9JB7 

interim 1035 —M3 
Mura'n 841 -XH 
Ststreet Rests 
CA7FC 801 +52 
CapitalA 1037 -31 
Captro 1031 +30 
CapitrtB 1630 +30 1 
ExchFd rfi0B49 +X10; 

EnerqyA 1148 +41 
GiEngyB 

‘ 1243 


-JB 


GvtlncA 

GvtlnB 

GthCn 

InvTrB 

invTrA p 

WivTrC 


Aggrlnn 742 -M' 

Comfdnx 1X98—46 

Fund nx 1843 -22 
•ricamenx 644 +54 
L4VGT 25.18 -J8 
NYTEn 1626 +53 
SPCtStn 1778 -.14 
TaxEx n 1074 - ns 

.ingsap""-# 

_ A3iaDynB|X62 — a 


1241 „ AsioA p 1X67—40 

882 -.14 GotlSTesp 6 31 -52 

880 -X» (ntllnv 1S33 +J9 

843 +59 Wrldlncp 855—56 

845 -5? ; vwiaTmpi49a 7n 


NYTFAp 811 +XB | VantCampeii Mer: 
NYTFC_ 8.12 +53 | CA TFAP17JI *.10 


Steadman Funds; 
Atnlndn 144 —51 
ASSOC n 46 
Invest n 137—01 
Oceans n X55 — JJ6 
stem Roe Fds: 
CopOnon333? *51 
Gvtlnc n 9.90 
HvMonn 1139 +43 


GwJhAp 1947 +38 
HiYldA p 1031 
InTFAp 1898 +59 
MunInApISJO +41 
MuIncBt 153a +m 
PA TEA p I7J6 -47 
PATFB 1734 -56 
STGlAp 841 — jh 
ST Gfflt 840—54 


Assetli RA lX96 -.10 

BICh 1794 -32 

Bond 1090 —51 

Security Funds: 

Sondp 746 

Equity 573 + 55 

EoGLA 1044 —.07 

Grinc 740 -.11 

TxEx 948 +57 

Uttra 744 + 56 

Selected mnds: 
AmShsnp1*75 +37 
StdShsnp 1045 +.13 
U5Govpn 896 +41 
S— g m a e Group; 
FronflerA 11.95 +37 
CcxiFdA 1676 + 31 
COTxA 7.37 -41 
CmSlfcAXlX39 +XB 
ComunA 1549 +49 
CommunO 1542 + 48 
FLTxA 770 + 54 
GATxA 749 + 52 
G0jfEmrqA143 +59 
GEmgO 1137 +.10 
GrowthA 5-52 +.10 
lncomeAXl*19 -18 
(naameD xl*17— .IS 
MIA 1646 —01 
LATxA 835 +XJ3 
MassTxA 850 +XB 
MDTxA 810 +4? 
MTTxA 862 — jD 3 
MinnTXA 795—41 
MOTxA 740 -52 


NatlTxA 

NJTxA 

NYTxA 

NCRxA 

OhioTxA 

ORTxA 

PATxA 


770 -.04 
776 +41 
811 +41 
775 +52 
873 +53 
774 +41 
7.93 -52 


CAHyTxA 642 + 51 
CAQTxA 676 + 53 
SCTxA 852 +53 
USGvtA p 750—01 
HiYBdAp 693 + 41 


Income n 943 —M2 1 SlglnAp 1125 _jw 
■— =— ' SWnBf 1335 -46 

TxFHBt 1*86 
TxFrt8Apl*87 ' ' 
USGvBt 1SXW-XB 
US GyAp 15.01 
UTBitvAp 1*|0 +j|7 
UfBBI 1*07 +44 
VWceExctRBtae: 

CtX>E 17814 +119 
DepBstn 8819 + 1.14 
Dfreran 17750 - 298 
Ebos 33835 -UJ 
gfd 25046+4^ 
FOE< 15049 - 40 
5cFtd 13239-241 
Vanguard Groan 
AdmlT n 1610 —43 
AdmLTn 1617 -xb 
A cfmST n 10X16 —01 
AssetAn 1442 -.18 
CiHivtn im +jj 
etrtnen 13 ao -J 3 
Exptorer 04674 -48 
Morgain 1234 -31 
Prmcon WJ8 +38 
Quant n 1643 +.10 
STAR n 1346 -.10 
Trtntf n 3249 — jo 
TrUS 3274 - 45 
STTsry n 1030 —41 
STFedn 1616-51 
STCorpn 1071 —41 
fTTsryn 1032 —43 


FxdtaA 1036 —52 
brtmGvA n!61B— 02 
NJMuAn 1047 - 53 
STlnvAn 9.98 
HortMr Fumfc 
Eabicpx 1*32 -XB 
Americ px 16B3 —19 
Band p 948 
CopGrp 
Gold 


GEq 

GrincA 

InvQln 


NY TE 

2S 

, USGov ... 

1634 +31 RBBGvfp 1813 
7.94 +54 RCMFund 2193 +54 


1*27 +X19 
10.11 +.10 
1076 +52 
1091 +54 
1157 +5* 
1845 -30 
17.14 -.12 
1149 +52 


Growth P 1X69 +.15 RSI Trust: 
income ox 9.94 —10 Acted 2675 +56 
Europe p 1847 +52 Core 3543 +31 
Hara1=dpx2X56+30 EmGr 3830 +96 
PWMBdpl033 +53 IntBd 2544 +41 
IrtlGr 2X38 —33 ST1F 1SXM +51 
Ptonrllp 1931 +.10 Value 2643 +32 
P»7hreep213H -31 Ralnbown 542 +.12 
ST Inc 191 . ReaGrap 1X65 -58 

TaxFreepK.ll -51 RewFuwh 
US ©VP 1614—01 C&BBal 1232 +55 


WnthREI 1X64 
PtoerJaAuv: 

Botancp 1X17 +JJ9 
EnterGr 2T.1B +42 f 
Govtn 933 
Grinc 1047 +58 
ItlSlGv 1692 —59 
InSGvAffi 955 —53 
MNTE »42 +.03 
NalfTE 1683 +55 
POCEwG 1555 —.19 
Sector p 17.95 +48 
Value p 1978 +30 
PtorTrtD 977 
PiprTrShD 990 —01 ! 


C&BEq 1X16 +.11 
DSIDv 1158 ♦ J>9 
DS1LM 971 
FMASPC 1047 +JJ4 
ICMSC 17.15 +32 
SAMI Pfdn 978 -52 
SirSpEqn 1754 +33 
SOGwfhn 1038 +.12 
SirSTRn 1605 
SuBrtn 1053 *J06 
SterSTF 9.98 
SterBln 1158 +.12 
TSWEq 11.18 +.10 
TSWRx iai7 —41 
TSWlntl 1X48—11 


PtanTTNtx 1638 +53 RchTangn 1836 +37 


Portico Fdss 
BcrtKn 2X27 +39. 
BcBdx Z7J8 —51 
Eqtrrdx 3337 +33 
Grtncn 2348 +321 
IrifSdM 10X17 —02 | 
MaGri-n2X57 +42 1 
ST Bond n 1037 —XU 
SoGrn 3(49 +41 
TxEmBd nlD55 -52 
Preterred Group; 


Rembrandi Fandc 
Aslan 898 —37 
BaTTYn 9.99 -55 
GlFxlnTrnl031 — 57 
GwthTrn 1041 +.12 
JrtlEgTrnlZ73 —56 
StGvFIT 943 —91 
SmCooT 1654 +.13 
TEFITrn 945 +55 
Tax FiTrn 9.96 
VotueTrnl619 -.10 


ApgGrthp 5.94 +55 
Balanced plS.14 +56 
Bandp 635 
ComSJkP 2949 -34 
GvSecsp 1602 +51 
Growth p 1777 + 33 
PATFp 1334 -52 
TFIncP 1X42 +JM 
World a 1248 —57 
SentryFUn 1534 + 39 
Sequoian 5599 +75 
Seven Seas Series: 
Matrix n 1259 +.19 
S8J>Mkfnl235 +32 
SPSOOn 1074 +.12 
STGvtn 977 
YldPIn 1050—01 
17MFtm* 

Gov Med 070 
Groincn 1135 +.11 
MATElnnlOXIO +53 
TExMfidnia03 +53 
Sttawmiit Funds: 
Fxdmdn Pf*93 —05 
FxdlncTr n*93 -55 
GrEalTr 1072 +.17 
GrincETr8845 +51 
GrEalvtn |!873 +.18 
GrlnEqln dtbA5 +51 
InfGvITr nx996 — JJ3 
lntGv mm P*86 —03 
LnncTr nx?74 —04 
SmCpEInflUS +.13 
SmCpET 1135 +.13 
imn Trash 

p 1048 +54 
nep >079 +52 
vGrp 1*39 +37 
FLInsp 942 +XM 
Grtncp 11.99 +30 
Growth p 1240 + 52 
InilGrp 1045 -.03 
NatMup 1131 +.02 
STG) p UK +51 
USGov p 10.08 


intmfldn 876 
IntMunn 1133 +53 
LMMhin 942 —41 
MgdMun 698 -JI3 
PrimcEq n!446 + 30 
Sped n Z345 -.19 
Stock n 2*28 +.11 
TotKetfl 2699 +32 
StepstoaeFupds: 
Baton p 1195 +.11 
GrEUB 1SJ3 -38 
IntBd 1Q3J 
LMGovA n946 
Va)Momenl*03 + .10 
StertMn Finds: 
Dividend n27J7 -41 
Growth n 2047 -39 
SmCdPnx2649 —52 
Strong Finds: 

Advtsn 1617 -xn 
Amman 1053 +56 
AsioPQcnlO.n —.16 
CmSfltn 1843 +30 
Dtscovn 1819 +32 
Gav3cn 1034 
Growth n 1141 
HfYliWUl 9.94 +.01 
Incon 9.78 —.02 
fnsMun 1094 + 56 
Intin 1443 —05 
invsrn 1937 +.16 
MunBdn 9.93 -XD 
Oppfnty n 2970 *ji 
STB ondn 1609 — xn 
STAItXI n 1620 
Total n 2531 +38 
SunArnertcu Fds: 
BcrtAsefA PlS.14 +.14 
BcrtAselBplXlO +.14 
DfvJncBp 493 
EmGrA p 1613 +36 
EmGrB 1857 +36 
FedScB p 1031 —02 
GrowthA pi 533 -.17 
HTlncBP 839 
HflncAP 628 —.01 
TE InsA p 1237 -JM 
USGvA 845 -51 
USGvBp 845—01 
ValueB 1574 -.11 
TARGET: 

InferBd In 1057 
IntlEqn 1X45 —II 
LgCapGr n999 +55 
LaCapV 1616 +59 
MhjBkdfnl052 
5mCapG 1351 +31 
SmCOpV 1X05 -39 
TckRtBd 9.96 
YNE Fuads 
Adi US A p 741 
BakmAP 1X27 -58 
BakmB 1233 + 58 
BdlncAP 1178—02 
CA TF Ap 744 -51 
CCpGrAP 154V +31 
CiqiGrB pnl544 -31 
GtobGApU49 —03 
GrOpAP 1X86 -.12 
GVSCAP 1132 -XC 
GwthA P 1048 —55 
HUncAP 1056 
IntEqAP 1540 +02 
bltEqBpn 1544 -52 
LtdUSA 1230 —M2 
MOSSTAU1640 +.05 
TxExAp 749 + 53 
809 +.10 


GNMAn 10.14 +Sl 
IT Coro n 041 
LTTsrvn 1603 —0| 
LTCorpn 888 -51 
HYCOrpn 796 
Prefdn 939 — 02 
IdxTolB n 077 —01 
IdxSTB n 9.94 —01 
IdxITBfl 998 —03 
IdxEat HL9S -JM 
Idx500 n 4*51 -44 
indnExfn 20.15 **\ 
IdxTotn 1194 +.15 
idxGron 1037- -J9 
idxValn 1X01 +.13 
klxSmC 1645 -31 
klxEurn 1140 
idxPncn 113? — 94 
Idxlnstn 4*90 -45 
MuHiYd n!042 -XU 
MunUntn 1X16 
MuLldn 1046 -41 
MuLongnlOSa -XB 
Mulnlgn 1235 -95 
MunShtn 1542 -41 
CAJnsLT mass +xm 
FL Insn 1655 -JOS 
NX Insn 
NYlnsn 
OHInsn 
PAlna n 




1140 *sa 
1045 -XM 
1137 -XM 
1192 -JI6 


VlrtueAP 
TRAK 
(nhFkn 


IntlEqn 

IntFxr 


-^gy-P-jo 

MDMuitnl048 +53 
USIndtn 1624—56 
USIncT n 1624 -56 
VlrtEq! In 12J7 +.13 
ValEaT n 1247 +.13 
VAMlfT n 1076 +54 
VaMunli 1676 +54 
kyllne Funds: 

Europe 1681 — XD 
Aflonthiyin 9.95 +53 
SpEswttnim +33 
SpEquilll 1135 +32 
SmBhBmySlusn A: 
AdiGvAp 999 
AdvsrAp 2743 +32 
ApGrAp 2809 -48 
ApprAp 1135 +.12 
TetGAp J248 +.15 
TMn 10439 +.13 
AzMuAp 1608 -54 
CUMuAp 1590 +53 
ttvsStlnc PB32 —02 
FdValAp BJl +.12 
GtOpAo 30.18 +58 
HBncAl 12X17 —02 


SPEnror 1559 +49 
SPGaWr 1333 -34 
SPHtthr 3491 -.10 
SPServr 2391 -38 
SPTechr 2615 -38 
SPUlil 11.13 -51 
USGron 1534 -X^ 
inflGr 1X48 -.14 
WHISlyn 1897 -99 
WriOnn 2046 -32 
wndsrn 1435 +J3 
wndsll 1757 *Ji 
Venture Advisers: 
Intffl 5.19 —01 
Munint 933 +91 
NYVen 1234 +.18 
RPFBt *17—51 
RPFGRt 1538 -XB 
RPFG1 1147 *31 
RPFCv 1747 -*JJ 
Victory Funds: 
ApgrGr 1047 *31 
CorpBd 947 —Ml 

Faulty .11 J» +,K 
GavtBd 972 —A 
Irtnt 9. 
SWGvlnn 079 . 

Vista FundS: 

BrtA 1137 +.10 
Bond on 1672 
CAIrt 6BS -XB 
CapGr 3X59 +J8 
CapGrBt 3343 +77 
Equity pn 1338 -.13 
Govinc 1136 —01 
Grinc 3146 +37 
GwV/Sh p 1543 -.M 
GrinBr 3137 -37 
InHEuA 1X18 —98 
NYTF 1142 +XM 
STBdp 1055 +91 
TF Inan 11.94 +JB 
Votumet 1574 +32 
Vayageur Fds: 

AZins 1689 +51 
COTF 1043 -54 
FL insd 1047 +53 
GroSIkp 17.99 +.17 
lATt 944 -92 
MNins 1043 * 92 




CoreEal 


Growthi 
I dxEq 
IrrtmBdS 

IntGvtS 

IrtTBdl 

MGOVH 

IntlEq 

IrrttEqS 


AssetAn 1695 +J06 ReSre tav Trsfc 
Fkdlnn lan —91 Baionced 1776 +.ll 
Growth n 1442 +.12 EqGro 19.14 +.17 
IntlP 1248 — JM Eqlncom 1874 +58 
ST Gov n 9.92—91 income 1577 + 91 
Value n 1192 +30 RevnBJCTi 1*93 +58 
Price Fund* RMrtfene Group; 

AdiUS 473 - BlueQip 3X73 +58 

Bakrtce 11.93 +JH RTFanto3545 +JM 
BOiG 1141 +.14 GovSecpx1XT5— 54 
CirtTxn 1623 -55 Growth p 2541 
CapAnrn 1190 +31 MidCapp2814 -52 
DivGron 1147 +.13 SocAwp 2649 +.01 
Eqlncn 1*84 +33 RimcoBd 9.71 —.02 
EqJdxn 1348 +.13 RlmoaStk 1X36 +.14 
Europen 1119 +53 RtverlnE 1654 +.09 
FEFn 1X78 —14 RjverflGVI 943 + 51 
FUnsimnl622 +52 RiveroideCap: 


GNMn 947 
GATFn 10.15 +91 
GtoGv 948 — 51 

Growth n 2064 +.12 
Gwthlnn 1671 -33 
WYldn 9XM 
incomen 950—01 
MBdn 
IntfDts n 


Equity 1X53 -40 
Fxtan 9.94 
TNMuCto 1615 +55 
RUbertSPn Stephms: 
Contra n 1141 -X16 
EmGr P 2072 -76 
VoLPfUS 15JM +J9 
9.92 —57 Rochester Fds: 

1747 —21 1 BdGrowpl346 +JM 


Monogedil044 
ManagedSl044 
PATFp 1053 +JD 
STBd I 952 —01 
SmCcpV5145l +36 
SmCapVl 1*02 +31 
Vatoet 1150 +.14 
Vetoes 1157 -.13 
PRARKyn I0X» +31 
PocSRcUS 9JS 
PacthcGrth 1057 +.18 


AuGrp 7640 +.92 
CATFp 753 +52 
Capkico 1542 +.13 
LISGv 971 
NotlaFds 
APresnt 10.13 

1240 -.10 
1052 +57 
1X96 +.13 
1619 

1601 +52 


CA TF 
EqVoi 
Govinco 
STCAn 


Asst A 0 
ATLAp 
BhnAp 
Carr a p 


11.99 

1644 . 

1140 

11.14 


GUnAp 
GKHAp 
GrthA p 
HflnApx 
tacAp 


’.IB 

. . 45 

COpAAp 1X73 -38 
CmTCA 946 - 58 
DvGrAP 31492 +58 
EurGrAP 9M +J15 
GEnAt 1175 +35 
1072 —5? 
1179 —12 
21.00 +.15 
89S 

1051 —01 

IiwGApx 1070 —01 
MHInAp 1040 *51 
NTaxApxll75 -53 
NVTsAp 1078 -.04 
RmFAP 1747 + 33 
5TGUTAPX266 
SmCOPA 1053 *50 
USGvA ax 946 —02 
UHApx 9.00 -XN 
’ 1355 +57 

1*17 -JO 
1541 -.17 
11.15 +.05 
13.14 -39 
943 -XJ7 
70.95 +59 
9.78 +55 
20 61 « ,14 


IntSIkn 1X10—12 RoMup 1818+59 
Japan n 1135—02 LtdNYp 338 +.01 
LntAmn 947 —52 Rodney Square: 

MdSW In S.06 _ Divln p 1198 —02 

MdTsFrnl035 + 51 Growth p 1658 +32 
MidCaP n 1549 +38 IrtlEqp 1243 —55 
NewAmn28J7 +46 RorcePund* 

N Asian 1836 — 50 PennMu 848 +.14 
Neu£ron2697 +50 Eqtnc 571 *58 
NwHrtn n 1*95 +45 OTC 645 - 58 
NJTFn 1693 +JI2 Premier n 642 +.06 
NYTxFn 1674 -XI3 Value tn 1051 +.15 
OTC n 1570 +.16 Rushmore Group: 
ScTTchn 203V -44 AmGosn 11.95 -.15 


*96 - LISGLgn 974 -51 

*67 — 02 US Intn 957 _.® 
1539 - 55 AflDTFn 1687 -55 
1107 +.12 VATFn 11.13 *56 
1059 +51 RydxNova 1041 -59 
948 +53 5BC WkSn 9.78 
,254 +51 SBCWMGr 1656 +.06 
164a +52 58SF Funds.. 

. 550 * 51 CocGrn 811 *56 

US Int 535 —02 Canvrtwn?2J2 -.11 

USLong 1624 -52 SSSFn 1872 -17 
VATFn 1050 +xn SB Funds 
PrimryTn 1141 +.17 Botancp 1X45 +57 


ST Ban 
ST G«n 
SmCVl 
SpecGr 
Spedn 

TxFreen 

TkFrHYnlXO* +51 
TFlnsI n 
TXFrSJn 


819 

1618 —02 
834 —54 
LgGrwn 1617 +.12 
LgVdn 977 -.12 
MlgBkdn 7.96 +.01 
Munin 836 +55 
SmGrwn 13.93 +43 
smvain 945 +.17 
THRJnn 833 
TempMan Group: 

AmaTrr 1X97 +.19 
CnpAcc 1540—02 
DevMktp 1471 —33 
Fonpip 940 —54 
GtobOpP 1X31 —OS 
Growth p 1856 +53 
Incnmp 943 —02 
RiEstp 1X93 —.10 
SmalCDP 839 +52 
World p 1631 +58 
Tempto tuM Insfifc 
EmMSp 1244 —55 
ForEqS 1342 —56 
FEsaS 1037 —04 
GrwthS 1157 -XM 
ThlndAwV 1753 -39 
Thomson Group: 

EqtnA 1354 + .14 
GwthA 2250 +35 
InOA 812 —M2 
IntlA 1X60 -.13 
OporA 3137 -48 
PTOMIA 1X94 +.17 
ShlGvA 949 —01 
TarvrtA 1339 - 47 
TExA 1154 +.05 
USGvA 935 —51 
EqlnB 1X01 +.13 
GrwthBt 2X38 +34 
broneBt 807 — M2 
irmt 1X30—12 
OparBI 31.18 +46 
IrtICAA 830 +53 +■” 

IntNYA 835 +.02 

UdMup 816 -51 Trec&«tll53 - 05 
LMTrp 7JU —in TaroetB 13.16 +46 
MgGvAp 1272 -*» 

Mg*fluApl893 +53 T ^* ar V f ^, „ 

AAaMuApl278 +55 J"** « 

MMuAp 1X97 +54 LWTIn 12.18 -XC 
NyMuAp 1*93 +.04 LldCdT 1276 - 52 
PrMtAp 2143 +40 LIdGyto 1X49 —Ol 
SpEqAp 2682 +.13 UdMunpIXSO -.02 
PTTRA 16.11 +x» NMlm 13.04 -03 
UWAp 1*13 —56 Tocquev 1344 +.14 
WlRCAp *44 +51 T 5*5 r . Rm ®S. v „ 

WWPAp 171 - QeApp JX9U +57 

SmiffuirRyStnn B: LAMun 11.11 +55 

AoGrflt 2752 +47 TotolRrt 9.15 -.02 
AoprBI 1132 +.12 WS Gv 1629 — 57 
CaMuBt 15.90 +53 Trodemarlc Fund*- 
CarrvB I 1*29 *.jj Eairtty nx 1041 +.12 
DvsInBt «.22 —02 povtlnco nx9.63— 56 
EurpB f I*J2 *57 KYMunnkl603 
FLMuBt 1052 +.02 SIGowtnx 949 — JJ5 
FdValBt 821 +.13 TlrpnsanieriPB: 

GIBtffi t 155s — J)6 AdiGvA 9.91 

GiOpB t 2946 +.0; CATFA p 1636 +54 

GvScBI 9 JO — 51 COPAPP 1341 -.IB 
GrlnBt 1D33 -59 EmGAp 2748 +.70 

HBrtcBt 1257 —02 GvtrtCP 809—07 

tovGOBt 1239 — XM GrtnA p 1145 t .qs 

MgGvBtn1272 — Ml 8JO — 51 

MBMuBI 15.93 +53 !*»*£* 7SM -52 

NJMuBt 1X97 -54 lBvQucLp 887 —52 
NyMuBl 1*93 +.04 _TFBdA 1645 -JJ3 
PrMtB I 2131 +40 TmsreTwrica^xt 
FrmTRBM6.11 +.08 SICWp; 12.06 -.11 
SectrBt 1555 *3* CATFB 1636 -03 

2043 -.12 EmGBf 2^30 -48 

17-22 +X» G^nct ?46 —.02 

1X37 +.15 GrlnBt 1147 +55, 

1748 +56 M3CJFI 047 - 51 I 

14.13-06 HlYM t 831-01 
644 + 51 NatRst Iiw 

TFBdBt 1045 -XC 
TriTOForCredUlt l 
GSP 948 _ nj I 

MSP 9.82 -jra 
TWP1996 9711 —.02 ._. 

TumerGEnIXU -30 IWeshnad Rinds: 

JweedyGV 1245 *.io ( Baiinst 7.0 


J2-C-E- 


72 t- ■ : - • . 

■s-* ' l;.-: 


tot. 




1054 -xn 

1X29 +53 
1629 —01 
1632 -JO 
10 J9 +JB2 
1632 — XB 


+.12 

+30 


SpEqBI 
SrrinH r 
TfSGBt 
TxExBI 
Ut8Br 
WlncB I 


ASStBt 
ATLBI 
BtueBJ 
CofTBI 
CapABi 
CmTcfl 
DvGrBI 
EuGrO I 
Grtafit 


Predrt Presv; 

DtvArti 1349 +.11 
GovtPri 949 — 03 
IrtsTEx 1603 +XIS 
SP100PI 1532 +.12 
TEPrt 9 XH -JM 
PrlnMBS 952 + 02 
W wrF w te 
BIChe 1X02 -.11 
Bond 115* * XJ7 
ConAo: 2048 -35 
EtrtBGr 2548 -J2 
Govt 11.14 -44 
Growth 3141 -J9 
Managed 1241 -xn 
TE Bd 1155 -52 
Utilities 10.09 
WWW 736— OB 

Prows VI 10.95 -.13 
PIFFxdlncnV.98 —02 
PtFirtMutPlQ.95 - JO 
Ptuv IPvCOuxvek 
EndvGtl 1151 -.17 
bi5tGrtn 11.90 -.15 
SmCapGr I3J6 +39 
PrudSpcnp 7.79 +.19 
PrudeatirtFunds 
NIchA 1343 * -30 


Niche 

Adi At 

BlackGv 

CAblAp 

EqufAo 

EqincA 

FICllAf 

GtahAp 

Cl Asia 

GtUtAI 

GvPlA tp 

GtQpAp 


HiYldA fp 843 


1333 -30 
960 

944-51 
10J2 +55 
1434 +.13 
1437 -.15 
148 +.11 
1*00 —.14 
1.84 -.51 
1431 +.01 
8.96 —M2 
1X90 -.19 


Bond no 1074 -51 
Bdlndxp 1030 —51 
CoaGrn 1237 -.19 
CarpQtnpni.98 
GNMA p 970 -51 

IntrmdBdplxra . 

SWGvnp 950—51 
UitMn P 1649 - 45 
■rtGvtnp 941 — J12 
tortP 10.91 -49 

EqJnc no 13.93 .jo 

EqlnUK npI5.91 +.15 
KS TF 1048 + 53 
MidCGp 1X23-37, 
PAMunnp)044 -M2 ! 
SmCan pnlS4S *40 I 
Value no 1047 -Mr 
CcpAno 1*36 -.141 
51 FE Trust 193 -46, 
Str Funds; I 

Grthlnc 2536 -31 I 
Growth n 1114 +.18 
Irtl 14.97 —25 


SmShBrnySbrui Fd* 
PniRe* 944 -43 
Prinllp 847 -53 
-gn u Ip 82S -.03 
Snah Bareev: 

InttC 17.81 —33 
CapAnA 1543 -.16 
CapApB 1538 -.16 
GtGytA 1243 - XM 
JncGruApl3J9 +.11 
ncRetA 951 +41 
IntJA 1741 — 34 
1746 —34 
MoGowtA 1X53 +51 
MuCaiA 1243 +.05 
MuFLA 13.15 - JM 
MuLtdA 644 - 52 
MuUSB *44 
MunNtA 1348 +55 
MuNJA 1X59 -JM 
JJjiJJYA 13.17 -JB 
SHTSY *08 —51 
USGvtA 1338 -52 
UNA p 1241 - 45 

iZS2S?5 ,,10 - M * M 

SmprSNGf 9.99 *46 

SoGea Funds: 

COW 1141 +.12 
Wnl 2172 -.17 

r SS£°S ,, - 6S * m 

SwStohr Funds: 

Baiana ,47 -06 
Dvrs Ida 1X38 - IS 
Grgk 1035 -.15 
InflG r 1240 -.01 
udminc 9.75 
UrvCKBd 9.71 -41 
Ltd in in 75 4| 

OHRS 851 ,5JB +■” 

OHTF 10.92 -45 
ff*Grai« 1032 -.13 
SotVolSt 1039 ..19 
SWtnx 10 ib -.10 
H5£j , ln 10.97 -41 
1613 -.11 
1*99 -33 
jC 1430 -42 
SAM Vain 1833-100 


Mlnnli* 

MinnTF 
MO Ins 
NatfTF 
NDTF 
US Gv 

Wa&Mi&Ree* 

TolRet 1X72 
Growth 15.18 
LtdTerm 9.92 - 

Munt 1047 +XQ 
Gtotxrt 9.40 —04 
WaBSt 833 -56 
Warburg Placus: . 
Grtncn 1*79 +79 
CopApp 11 1440 +38 
EmGlhn 2X95 +4? 
Rxdincn 1608 — 51 
GtoWFxdn 10.95 — Mi 
IntEqun 1941 —17 
InstEqn 1547—17 
intGvtn 10X19 -41 
NY Muni nl 030 -XB 
WasoKhAgt047 *M 
WetssFtecfc Green 
Divine 1347 + 53 
Govt 1051 —41 
Grinc 2*34 -36 
Gwth 12*29-238 
OuanfEqn 544 -.06 
Tudor n 2436 +39 
WteitzPVafnMi +.19 
WeitzVdln 1648 +38 
WeBsFuodE 
AslAKn 1617 +43 
Banakbtn 943 - 

Gwtnsikn1i43 +.I7A 
SAP 500 n 1040 -.1 
USTABn 931 —51 
Wrahwa: 

AZTF 1666 +54 
BdgPI 1444 L 
LTBd 937 +JH 
MadVat 1336 *20 
ORTE 1648 +J15 
BaiUnrln 1849 +49 
BusVlln 2140 +.18 
EqfnJil 11.15 +J2 
GNMA In 1559 -53 
IntBdin 1036 + 

MIDCOI n 1747 +40 
ST Gavtl 1543 - 

Ba+IrrvR 1847 +47 
GNWIAR 1557 +41 
AlUdcaR 17JS6 + J 
STGOvtR 1541— « 


h?'.' 





• 


■>5-* 


2Bth Century; 

Ballnvn 1648 -.10 
Gifr n 1852 - 47 
Growthn 23.95 +49 
JJWnvn 10.99 -.18 
IntEqn 7.74 +55 
LTBondn 941 —01 
Spied n 39.65 -58 
TjfSTn 1040 .41 
TuGim n 1035 -.03 
TxELTn 1035 - JM 
Ultra n 2J.04 . 22 
USGvShTn949 -41 
Valuer 531 -47 
..Vision 10T3 -38 
USLorTOSttnS^I -55 
U JAA Group: 
*5?vCthn203B -JB 
8 * rown)L6; -44 
CABdn 1042 -xa 


Const n 

GNMA 

Goldn 

Crttincn 
Grwth n 
IncStkn 


VC/Stk 




3839 

9.70 


JB 


2X73 -47 
1045 —J72 
9.16 -58 
1053 -.13 
?7.91 -38 

. — 14J4 -43 

toromen lira +.01 

inti n 1645 14 

NYBdn iu? 
S hlTB ndn 9.91 

TkFIn 9J6 ♦ 45 

TxEITn 13.78 
TxELTn 1349 .42 
104/ *41 
1101 4 .01 
1340—04 


Ealnit 

InrBro 

BotSvc 

EqSvc 

IntBdSw 


541 
1043 — . 
737 + 56 
54? +57 
10X0—01 


waSamBtair 
Growthn 9.93 +.12 
Income x 1639 — JB 
inflGihn 1X63 —17 
waamPnt ' 
PerwiSqo 1TJM *59 
PATxFr 11.02 +51 
OurtRy 1042 - 43 
USGov 1046 -JB 
Wood Strothers: 
WlrtRtn 1620— 56 
WinGrtn 11.13 +2 
WinMT p 951 -XO 
WtoGiin 1173 -.IJ 
VVInAGtR 1*38 +55 
Woodward Fds: • 

Band 10X16 -52 
Eqldx 1131 +.11 


TxE9in 

VABd 

Wd&rn 


USTMasteri 
C 5 ™ 1035 —33 

ISS5 rnr J- 44 — - 31 

Pttoly 20.70 -38 


WHuwfr.; ... 1C 

- 01 PwEuro 


tocGru 

iniMadln 

toWFd 

IniTE 

LTTE 

•Again 

NY TE 


InGrBIflp 1621 .1 CATF 1049 .04 

IrtGSiVP 10J3 +53 1 CrpSlk n 3346 *33 
IhTEBdT 01671 -.03 DvsJn ||jj .m 
S uttUEqT nltL45 + J7 j GNMA 1699 


STBdTrn 0.96 — 01 
ShTTrTrn 9.90 
VirtincT n 1047 -58 
ValtncLp 1045 -Jff 
Safeco Funds 
OtfTFrn 11.90 -.10 
Equity n 13.96 +.17 


Gtolnc 1817 . 33 
UjGpvf 14.97 —01 

VRG 1663 41 

Sftndtahinwfc 
Eauily n 3231 -36 


W-55 -.11 
*95 

1047 -.10 
841 -41 
9.11 -JM 
8.73 

634 -51 
8.10 -51 

uSSSl™ ‘*1 

SS5?b« 21-M — n ; 

9.76 - .12 I 
GvtSec 531 
Hilncll " 1 


STGvSec 


GrVal 
IntBd 
int ms 
Mi Mun 
AAunBd 
□poort 


Fvdlncm n20 79 - 51 1 J 35 

GF«nn 1938 -51 I 


1135 -58 
10.18 - 
11.17 -.1? 
1022 -XJ5 
1030 -55 

15.12 -.11 

Working Assets: ' 
CIGro 1143 -3? 
GUnc 1641 - 

CIBcd 1132 *.W 
WOrtdFunds:. < 

Nwprng w-li— -52 
VwUEP 1*82 —19 
VqrtWV o 1147 -JJ 
WrigM Funds: 

Curin 1044 -SB 
GvObn 1346—® 
InBJCh 1343 — O 
JrBIChx 1X35 -« 
NetrSdn 1651 — « 
QlkGar 1248 -.1} 
S0IBO11H 15.14 *-lJ 
TotRMn 1243 —51 
Yackimnnp9J6 *.« 
YamGtob 934 -55 
Zmig Funds: ■ - 

StratA 1X92 +.10 
ZSAPPA 1479 -.18 
23MAA 1237 *05 
ZSGvao 1614 -51 
ZSPAp 1X96 -.W 
Strata 1X01 +.11 
Z5AOPB 1*68 -.1 
ZSMAB 1X35 . 
ZSGvB 10.17 -Ml 
ZSPB 173S +.10 


■r. /' ■- 

•v"---' 

■l J*' , 


C • - . 

KjS\. 

■ 


<-■■ ■■: 

V r 'J,. 

> *■* •- . t 

-- 

... 

?SbS- • - 
* v ... - — 


•C-' r 




'Jr.; 




HE 


•vm/9 





a_ — rC 

i? — r- 


«*■% 


< 2 -?. 


is —*.1 


•ljn< 


■a T.r«i 

Z T_' 

a -.;. 
* -v 
:< - k 

*'• —t'l 

A — -4 


‘=SN : 


t * 1 


J.S? 

:.5C -JS 

Te-’ 

it’ - is 




-•4 2 .J? 

- • Ifi 
.» - 1 ??. 


•-M- *^ r ! c s! 

- .. - M “ 'Utir;. *■ 


m 

;.«* - ft 




j :i _ 12 

-<J» --j- 

ijc -.•: 

iTsa 

s*J - n: 
13* r- 
fja * :s 

\45 - ‘ 
?.« — r; 
J :* - ii 


~ V .- . ' “it 

; -• rUifr^a 

- _.. •— -'Uic ij, 

. " T" 


“-^ri j 




L>4 


5.1i 

?►' — 
1 C 

in - :• 
?Ht 
i 3* 

S’-’ — ' 
in -:■ 


■"“ J « '■bdi 


■Mtt- 


Ofc'i' 


■," r ‘ ^ ^ 
•4ic!'. 


- 

'-J 

.•• 

IK 

ii.'-. - 

5c 

- 

Cl 

*.-** - 


'5X7 

■i 

‘5n- - 


:e.V> • 


!' *3 


j v- 

7z 

■ 

... 


!s.~* - 


y, . 


LSi ’ 

■i 

1 

■ 

li 

•: 

' 3 

:i.#i - 

-•j 

J *. ■ 


ii:-.' • 

“-I 

r: - 


:r> ■ 


VJ1 * 


- 


71 4T - 
X" - 

Vj 

■ 


f •> ■ 


:.a ■■ 


. - 

1 p • 

*A'. • 


'•:z: 

j. * 



. ■ - 






■ •” .( . 

■ V 


? m 

... 1 

O 

*•» 

r, 


; _ 


V v', „ 

, l»" 

- t r 

§. 


i "A 

_ j 

T 



j c 


; ~r.) 


v: '■-} 


iS 


•. t 


«*«• 


* .< 


X. 

■ 

: . 

’’S' 


- 


. . w 


.•'!» . 

, . r. 

• i 

7* 


■ si 

Ih«' 


: * 

i 

■ 


tie 

• M, 

wuo. 



. -4 


■ 


■ J*- 

n " j JL . 

... 7" 

J • : . -X 

’•* 



-n -■» ■ 

. J£. 

• ■ 5t. 

• -i 

■arK 

• .W 

ifrM 


rr t • 

■ 5!- 

ca ~ 

1 

T, 4 rt * ' 

SA 

if ' B* 


ft' : 

. 

xj a 

- r. 


■■iDijc 


'• ! \»T.- 


:■ -r c 


■ = v:, 

■ j _. . 


• rr n* 




New Inti 

1. .— i - — - .. 


lioi 

■al 

Bond Issues 

^ Con^piled by Laurence Desvilettes 






e 

Amount 

fmtfflone) 

MU 

COUP- rw«, 
^ TtiGo 

Price 

end Terms 

week 

Floating Rate Notes 

IJL florae Exspor Impor 
^Indonesia 

$159 

1999 

1.20 

100 

— 

Ownr 6flionth Ubor. NorKaBafalo. Fm 0.625% (Nomura 
lrt\| 

'European Investment 
H Bank 

v:# 

$100 

2002 

K 


— - 

Briow A- rnomh Libor. Mmimum imereti 5%, man mum 816%. 
Hue pm vanobie. NoncoHobis. Foog*le with owWonding 
smc. r attire total amount to $600 mIioa. Fe*» not tetewd. 
(ICddar, Peabody Inti) 

HydroQuebec 

$500 

1999 

Ebor 

99.18 

— 

tnieresr wtl be the 3-momh lAor. Nonoaflabta. Fees 0.15% 
[CS first BostonJ 

'. Institute Notional de 
hdustria 

$150 

1999 

1/16 

99 JO 

— 

Below 3-morth Ubor. NoncoUoble. Fees 0.15%. (Merrill Lynch 
btt'l.) 

\ Korea Development 
^'Bonk 

f,: : 

$200 

1999 

0JO 

99.95 

— 

Over 6momh Libor. NoneoHable. Fees rvot (kudtMd. [Industn- 
d Bant of Japaa) 

£ New Zealand 

h. 

$1,000 

1999 

K 

9978 

— 

fiefciw 3Hnonth Libor. Caltobie at par from 1996. Fees 0.15%. 

Denommononi SltXOOO. (UBSJ 

^ ; Nippon Kinroku 
n- -Company 

$100 

1998 

0.275 

100 

— 

Over 3- month Libor. NoneoHafate. Fees 0J0% DonomuntioRS 
5100.000. {Fup Inti Fmance.) 

. Pemex 

$200 

1997 

2^5~ 

100 

— 

Over 3-marth Libor, wMhm defined range. NanaaHoblo. Fees 
0.375V fOwae Investment Bank.) 

a " Femex 

■ 1 

$200 

1997 

0.85 

100 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. NoneoHafate. Fees 0373% (Swvu Bank 
Corp.) 

t Japan Airiines 

i 

Y 10,000 

1998 

'A 

10014 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Nonecdable. Fees 0.25%. DenoiGnatoni 
100 rrnOon yen. (UJ Intig 

* Fbed-Coupons 

' Credit Local de 
.' .France 

$200 

1999 

6 A 

99738 

9943 

NoncoUoble. Fins 0.25% Denominations 510.000. (Fup Inti) 

Freeport Terminof 
(Malta) 

$205 

2009 

m 

99.861 

— 

Semiannually. Sinking fund re start in 1999. Fees 040%. 
(Bankers Trust ML) 

Ford CrecSt Europe 

DM200 

1999 

6 

101 J5 

— 

Reoffered at 99 35. NoncoUoble. Fees 2% (MernU lynch.) 

« Philips Etedronks 

FF 1 ,000 

2002 

6 a 

101X125 

— 

ReaRered at 99^5. NoncoUoble. Fee* 1 M, (Ofackt Commer- 
dal de France.) 

6 Austria 

m. 200,000 

2004 

m 

100.15 

9&40 

Noncoflofale. Fees 2% (Deutsche Bank.) 

European Investment 
Bank 

■ DP 300 

2002 

6 

1007X5 

98.15 

Reoffered at 9940. NoncoUoble. Fees 1% (Rabobank Neder- 
land.) 

Bank voor 
i Nederlandse 
* Gemeenten 

a 150 

1997 

6 Yi 

101.035 


Reoffered ct 99-86- Nencalable. Fees 1H%. (ABNAnvo 
Barfu) 

Toyota Motor Credit 
Carp. 

a 150 

1997 

6Ya 

10014 

— 

Reoffered at 98.975. Noncdleble. Fees 1H%. (Wood Gundy.) 

BNP Patific Australia 

AmS75 

1997 

6 Yi 

100475 

98.95 

NoncoUoble. Fees lMr% (Hombroe Bank.) 

. ; Mitsubishi Carp. 

■ Finance 

Y 10,000 

1997 

3 

100 

— 

Interes wfll be 3% until 1 996, thereafter 340% Caloble at par 
in 1997. F«a 0.1875% pU IntL] 

Cqidty-Unked 

' Bunka Shutter Co. 

$100 

7998 

1 

100 

— 

Nonoalable. Each $10/100 note with two warrants exercis- 
able into company 'i tharu at B02 yen per share and at 106.95 
yen per dollar. Fees 216%. (Nomura ML) 

' • Mitsubishi Oil 
~ Company 

$250 

1998 

116 

100 

— 

Nonedfcdtfe. Each $10,000 note » dh me warrants e*erch- 
able into company's shares at on expected 2H% premium. 
Fees 216% Tents to be sat March 24. (Yomaichi ML) 

"ToaCorpi 

$150 - 

1998 

114 

100 




able Mo oampany's shares at 737 yen per share and a 107 JO 
yen per dolor. Fees 2K% (Ftldco Europe.) 

Uniden Corp. 

$160 

1998 

1 

100 

— 

NonooUde. Each SlOjOOO note with two warrants exerbs- 
able into company s shares id 3782 yen per share aid at 
106.95 yen per delar. Fees 7%%. (Nomura IntL] 

Ddwa Inti Finance 

■A 

Y 50,000 - 

1998 

214 

100 


Coupon wil be 2M% in first yew, dedning by 075% yearly. 
Noncalbbie. Convertible Mo Ddwa Bank's shates al 1,097 
yen per share, a )D% pretniunL Fees 216% (Sctemon Brothers 
IntL) 


.- “BONDS: Amid Slump , Investors Turn to Alternatives 

OrtwrihwByy 


“ - operation is that the Comdex' also 
1 ~ : - floats. At each three-month coupon 
'"-"•reset, the oomdor is set at 50 baas 
its above LIBOR asd 25 basis 
its below. This provides inyes- 
; ‘-~ : tors somewhat more protection 
" “-than existing corridor issues that 
-• •-.have preset adjustments to the 
range. 


because most had an initial ceiling 
of 4 percent on the initial coupon. 
Three-month LIBOR is currently 
3.875 percent and at the growing 
risk or holding paper paying no 
interest, holders dumped the notes 
as the interbank rate rose dose to 


the ceiling. Traders said prices fed 
red wi ‘ 


' The corridor floaten have per- 
formed badly during the setoff 


3 to 4 percent, compared with de- 
clines of 1V4 percent on fixed-cou- 
pon two-year paper. 

As for the Femex deal, critics 
complained that it was flawed be- 
cause investors who like the high 


coupons an emerging-market pa- 
per are uncomfortable with struc- 
tured deals, while investors who 
want the enhanced income of struc- 
tured issues prefer paper from top- 
rated issuers. 

Investors preferring structured 
deals were offered SI 00 million of 
eight-year collared paper from the 
European Investment Bank. Inter- 
est was set at 25 basis points below 
six-month LIBOR but the coupon 
will never be less than 5 percent nor 
more than 8V4 percent 


T. - MUTUAL: Risks Rise as Funds Reshape U.S. System 

Confirmed from Page 9 


~ -■ - 


„. “-fund shares, up from 6 percent in 
:-i98o. 

;v"V So far, that shift has had benign 
consequences for the economy. 
.* More households have been able to 
V" benefit from the rising stock and 
' V? bond markets. 

in addition, mutual funds have 
V - been lag buyers of corporate bonds 
~ and of initial public stock offerings, 
^ which have hoped reduce the debt 
~\ ’l - 'burden on many companies and 
faBTice new corporations. 

■ Looking ahead, however, the 
' - .side-effects may not be benign. A 
' Tapid rise in interest rams that 
... pushed down bond and stock 
prices while increasing the returns 
: '■f'. on insured savings accounts and 
certificates of deposit could have 


sm a ll investors fleeing the mutual 
funds for the safety of banks. 


“Will households simply reduce 


money flows to mutual funds or 
will there be large-scale liquidation 
of fund assets?” Mr. Hale asked. 
“If the household sector does liqui- 
date equity funds in response to 
higher interest rales, will it set in 
motion a self-reinforcing down- 
ward spiral in equity prices as fall- 
ing share prices encourage yet more 
liquidation? If there is a slump in 
stock and bond prices, will house- 
holds curtail their consumer spend- 
ing by more than in past business 
cydes because erf wealth losses?” 

Since the Federal Reserve Board 
pushed up short-term interest rates 


in February, there has not been a 
massive sell -< 


Ll-off of securities by ner- 


vous mutual fund shareholders. 

But Mr. Hale said that could 
change as rates move higher. “Go 
out a year,” he said “Say that 
short-term rates go to 5 percent or 6 
percent. That would do a lot of 
damage to the stock market.” He 
added: “Then you would have a 
bear market that would be greatly 
magnified by the mutual-fund fac- 
tor.” 

Many Wall Street analysts said 
they expected families to suffer se- 
vere reductions of their net worth 
in such an event Mr. Hale estimat- 
ed that households have 60 penxapt 
of their discretionary funds in 
stocks and bonds. 

If household wealth declined 
precipitously with the securities 
markets, the current economic re- 
covery could be endangered 






JTJNDS: How Schwab Is Branching Out 


. 1 * "3* 
-•*.*» “ 


■LU ' • . 
:•* M - - • 

<*. - t 




..3» 




’• iSL - St 


**- 


• •-? 


W 


• 6 ? 

I 


. -Jr 

C. • i'-r JS- 




I 


* 

» 


•5 




A 

k.- 


Couthmed from Page 9 

- i-.r -* fund famil y to another as among 
stocks. . „ 

.By attacking fees and chaHeng- 
.. ing funds with heavy commissions. 
* .Mr. Schwab is threatening die easy 
‘ ■ profits that the mutual fund mdus- 
. -■/ try has enjoyed for more than a 

l'\ *. v daraide With more than 2,000 new 
^ " One Sourceacconnts being opened 

daily, Charles Schwab Coip-, al- 
‘ ready the largest discount broker, 

' with $100 bQlion in customer as- 
Sets, is on its way to beooirnng a 
mutual fund giant. 

“Between Fidelity and Van- 
guard, you will have one more very 
> large competitor — Schwab,” said 

T ii Guy MoszkowskL an analyst with 

vV Sanford Bernstein & Co. 

That is what Mr. Schwab wants. 

Looking for new ways to grow, he 

■* divined that power in the crowded 
fond industry is shifting from thwe 
• t* who m anag e funds to those who 
- find new ways to sell then. 

. ■->' “We're not out to mannfactore 

funds, but to distribute them, a Mr- 
V ■- Schwab said in an interview in ms 
office overiodong San Frmicjsco 
*. ' Bay. “There are great nmo s ctu 
there. And well add new customers 


familiarity — the “warm and fuz- 
zies" in industry jargon — that have 
r^nv-nfwt customers to specific fund 
families. Some fear Mr. Schwab 
could gobble up their clients if the 
markets go sour and they flee to Mr. 
Schwab's money-market funds, the 
only ones allowed in One Source. 

One Source is not Mr. Schwab's 
first encounter with mutual funds. 
Sinrai the mid-1980s, Mr. Schwab 
has sold hundreds of no-load funds 
through its brokerage operation, but 
charged a broker’s fee. This was 
offered as a convenience to Mr. 
Schwab's customer — and given 
the name Mutual Fund Marketplace 
— but it did not fit a company that 
prided itsdf on low prices. “We were 

offering the public the highest-cost 


way to buy no-load funds,’' Mr. 
Schwab said. “It never sat wdl with 


me. 


That program still exists, and now 
has around $17 billion in assets un- 


ivjf that they never had before .’ 1 
.inilt'k' ‘ ForlhefimdsmOceSourre»Mr- 
1 71 ■ Schwab has become the devil they 

^ tove. Ifis program gives a powCTfu 1 

'■/V ' boost "to a whole tier of wcD-jsp 011 - 

• ed but smallff funds at the mro®* 

v ' ' Of more costly ones sold by bro«^ 
: ‘ banks and big fund famflies- Funds 
- hi One Source get millions in new 
Sonars, but with trade-offs. 

• Mr. Schwab keeps all the custon^ 
fer names to hurodf 
chance to sell other product to 
them. Many say One Sowoe » 
breaking the bonds of loyalty and 


.3* 

J ■ K— Jt 


■ 

it-U 


*1 -i 


* a t 

S' if 4 

r •<*.» *.n. ■ 


Source apart was the decision to 
have the funds themselves jack up 
the fees —about 25 basis points, or 
25 cents, foreway $100 that comes 
to them through One Source. 

Of course, asking funds to pay 
when they never had before wasn’t 
easy, “we thought they were cra- 
zy,” said Gregory Contillo, market- 
ing vice prcsdent at Founders As- 
set Management Inc.. 


Eight fund families signed on 
wilhScl ’ " * 


r Ji 


W1U1 ^chwab initially and money is 

now flowing into One Source at the 

rate of about $35 million a day. 
One Source recently passed its 
break-even point of $10 billion m 
peewe ahead of schedule. Last 
year, it accounted for a remarkable 
5.4 percent of all fund sales han- 
ded oy brokers — ■ and the hard 


marketing began only last summer. 

Eventnough the funds pay Mr. 
Schwab for marketing and distri- 
bution, they say the amount is pret- 
ty much what they would spend to 
Jure new customers with their own 
marketing. But One Source enables 
them to find customers that they 
can't always find on their own. 
Most report that 10 percent to 20 
percent of all new dollars are conn 
_ Mr. Schwab, 
are some notable holdouts 
from One Source. Vanguard 
Group, the second-laigest ‘ family 
after Fidelity, has an unusual 
shareholder-owned, nonprofit 
structure and would find its razor- 
thin operating margins wiped out 
by paying Mr. Schwab. 

**We do for two basis points what 
Schwab does for 25," said Brian 
Mattes, a spokesman. “We’re not 
like the small funds where it makes 
sense to pay for distribution." 

T. Rowe Pike, the founh-largcst 
direct marketer, similarly sees no 
need for One Source — even 
though it, like Vanguard, sells no- 
load funds through Sdzwab bro- 
kers, at a fee to the customer. 

Meanwhile, Fidelity has directly 
matched One Source, but its prod- 
uct is less successful Fidelity’s 
Funds Network also sells more 
than 200 no-load funds on the same 
“no fee” baas as Mr. Schwab docs. 
“They have a nice little niche prod- 
uct with One Source, and we 
thought it was nice enough to 
maidh,” said Servison of Fidelity. 
But only nine outride families have 
signed up, the program has only 
about $4 bfiUon in assets (some 
from an earlier program that 
charged fees) and nearly 90 percent 
of the sales are of Fiddity funds. 


... 


N.Y.Fed 
Stays Wary 
Of Inflation 


All Eyes on FOMC Meeting 

Bate Increase Could Stabilize Bond Market 


Compiled ty Our Staff From Dispatches 

HOUSTON — The Federal Re- 
serve Board must remain on guard 
against inflation because a surge in 
OS. prices would have catastrophic 
social effects, the brad of the Feder- 
al Reserve Bank of New York said. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve Board’s ac- 
tion — or inaction — on interest rates this week will be 
the key to price moves in government securities mar- 
kets, traders and analysts said. 

Last week, the price of the benchmark 30-year 
Treasury bond was little changed, finishing at 91 


U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 


“We cannot afford to risk a surge 
in inflation,” William J. McDon- 
ough said Saturday, adding that a 
“dismal" national savings rate and 
a rising tide of government debt 
increased the potential for rising 
inflation to irritate social ills. 

Speaking at a conference on the 
role of savings in economic growth, 
Mr. McDonough said the low na- 
tional savings rate leaves people 
with little money to spend on social 
needs such as care lor the elderly 
and education. He pointed out that 
retired people living on fixed in- 
comes and low-income workers 
with liule disposable income suffer 
most in an environment of high or 
rising inflation. 

“Given both its macroeconomic 
and social implications, inflation 
must remain subdued," he said. 
“The Federal Reserve must not 
permit an acceleration in the rate of 
inflation.” 

He said the Fed must find the 
balance between controlling infla- 
tion and choking off economic 
growth. 

Making the task difficult is the 
federal budget deficit, he said. 
Even under the most optimistic 
projections, the size of the deficit 
relative to gross national product 
wil] stay wdl above the pre-1980 
level of 1 J percent, he added. 

Also at the conference, Edward 
Kelley, a Federal Reserve Board 


h 11. The yield finished at 6.903 percent, com- , 
with 6.90$ percent the previous week. percent 

'■ the market had a rollercoaster week, first rising Anal] 


26/32, compared with 91 25/32 in the week that ended 
March 11. The 
pared 
But 

oq government data showing subdued ii 

then having those gains ripped away by President Bill 
Clinton's summoning of Alan Greenspan, the Fed 
c hairman , to the White House for a meeting on Friday. 


increase in the federal funds rate, which banks charge 
each other for overnight loans. 

"We’ve spent the better part of six weeks obsessing 
about this,” said Frederick Sturm, an economist at Fuji 
Securities. “The market has already priced in at least 
another 25-basis-pouu move and more Hkdy more" 

Some economists said they thought the Fed may 
decide bigger is better and push up the federal funds 
rate by 50baris points, instead of 25. Others said they 
thought the Fed might also increase the discount rate, 
which it charges on loans to commercial banks, to 3.50 
from the current 3.00 percent. 

Analysts said a bigger increase would cause a sell- 
off of short-term debt But it also would flatten the 
yidd curve, the difference between long- and short- 
term yields, as the apparent resolve of the Fed to fight 
inflation reduced the premium investors demanded 
for long-term investments. 


The Treasury bond market has been in a taHspin 
since the Fed's shift to a tightening policy on Feb. 4. Another possibility is no tightening at all from the 
bui a quaner-pcim increase this week has the poten- Fed. That viewpoint gained some adherents last week 


tial to stabilize the market for the fust time since the 
initial shock of die first tightening in monetary policy 
in five years. 

The Federal Open Market Committee is to meet on 
Tuesday, and most economists said they expected the 
Fed’s policy-making arm to engineer a quarter-point 


because February reports showed inflation in check. 
Talk that Fed policymakers were concerned about the 
bond market’s poor performance in the wake of the 
first tightening also fueled sentiment the Fed may bold 
rates steady. 

(Knight -Kidder, Reuters, Bloomberg) 


MAILED FROM 
AMERICA 


MAIL ORDER MAGAZINES 

Have the latest issues of over 
2,500 American magazines 
delivered to you within 3 days. 

Fora catalog call 516-329-3200 
or Fax: 516-329-0729 
THE MAGAZINE STORE 
48 Park Place 

East Hampton, N.Y. II937 USA. 


DISCOUNTS UP TO 30% 

On almost any US Book In Print 
worldwide mall order sento 
Serving Ifldfwdvals a lasritwfcmal khvoBi 
NEW WORLD BOOKS 
2 Gains Road - PO Box 878 
Soffem, NY 10901 
914-354-2600 - Fax; 914-354-1936 


DIRECT PROM AMERICA 

Ws buy and slip to you worldwide. 
Food, tipes, books, clothes, etc. 
AUTTLE DBTEROrr 

25 McLean Drtre 
Sudbury, MA 01776 

Tat 508-443-7751 - Fate 508-443-7782 USA 


Schrempp Seen as Successor 
When Daimler’s Reuter Moves 


governor, said the North American 
FreeTr 


i Trade Agreement could allow 
U-S. banks to open branches in 
Canada and Mexico. 


But he cautioned that careful 
regulation and supervision would 
be needed to ensure safe lending 
practices were followed. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Reuters 

BONN — Jurgen Schrempp, 
chairman of Deutsche Aerospace 
AG, will probably succeed Edzani 
Reuter as head of Deutsche Acro- 
ss parent company, Daimler- 
AG, next year, according to 
German news reports. 

Monday's editions of Der Spie- 
gel magazine and Die Wdt newspa- 
per said Mr. Schrempp, 49, would 
probably replace Mr. Reuter, 66 , as 
chairman of Europe's biggest in- 
dustrial group. Mr. Reuter's con- 
tract expires in 1995. 

The reports said Mr. Reuter 
would continue to influence the 
company by replacing Hilmar 
Kopper, the chief executive of 
Deutsche Bank, as chairman of 
Daimler's supervisory board. 


Euro Disney Draw Falls by 1 Million 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — About 1 million fewer people visited Euro Disney during the 
amusement park's second year, partly because of closure rumors, the 
park's chairman, Philippe Bourguignon. said in an interview released 
Saturday. By the second anniversary, April 12, attendance “should be 
around 9.5 million, " he told the Journal de Dimanche, down from the 
first-year figure of 10.5 milli on. 

Still the No. 1 paid tourist draw in Europe, the park lost about $930 
minion during its financial year ending last September. 


Lost Week’s Markets 


AC fieuns are as at dose oftmdbnr Friday 


WMMN 


Stock Indexes 

Mar. IB 
W9&A5 
20&24 
1.73274 
43AJ1 
47106 
55236 
261 JS 


DJ Indus. 
DJ UH1. 
DJ Trans. 
S 4 P 100 
S8.P5W 
S&Ptnd 
NYSE CP 
BriWa 
FTSE100 
FT 30 


Mar. 11 
186270 
2027? 
172104 
43274 


547-0 

25853 


ChU* 
+085% 
—15?% 
+048% 
+ 082% 
+ 0.99 % 
+ 090% 
+ 189% 


Money Rates 

' unltadSlatas 


Mar. 18 Mar.1l 


Discount ratv 
Prime rate 
Federal funds rate 


X00 3X0 

6X0 6X0 

33/16 3Vfc 


Discount IV 116 

Call money 21/16 21/16 

3-mantti Interbank 2 5/16 213/16 


1218.10 

2541.90 


119150 +082% 
2519X0 + 091% 


Nikkei 225 20449. 20110 +176% 


DAX 2,15551 110349 + 248% 

Hu Knee 

Hans Seng 9.13131 9,90556 —781% 


Lombard 
Call money 
3-manffl Interbank 
UtHoto 

Bank base rate 
Call money 
S-momti Interbank 


6% tPA 

585 Mi 

580 550 


5% 5V. 

5V, 5V. 

5V. 5V» 


MSCIP 


627 JO 


61970 + 171 % 


OoM Mar, 18 Mar. II me 

London pjm. flxS 38685 38685 —083% 


Mbrftf index From Moruan Stonier Capital tnrt 


NOMURA PRUDENTIAL FUND PART H 


Sod£t£ d’investissement h Capital Variable 
2, boulevard Royal, Luxembourg 
R.C. Luxembourg B-25766 

Notice of Extraordinary General Meeting 
The shareholders of NOMURA PRUDENTIAL FUND PART U (“the 
FuntD are hereby convened to attend an ExUmxdinaiy Genera] Meeting of 
Shareholders lo be held on March 31, 1994 at 3:00 p.m. ai the offices of 
Banqoe Internationale & Luxembourg, 2 boulevard Royal, Luxembourg, 
Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg to deliberate on the following agenda: 

1. to resolve to liquidate the Fond 
1 to appoint a liquidator 

3. to resolve to convene the second EGM in order to consider to report of 
the liquidator and to appoint an auditor 

4. to resolve to convene the third EGM to consider the report of the auditor 
and to decide the dose of the liquidation 

The Meeting convened for the same purpose to be held on February 28, 
1994 led to be adjourned for lack or quorum. 

Shareholders are advised that at this meeting no quorum is required for the 
holding of the meeting and decisions on the agenda in order to be validly 
taken require a majority vote m favour of such decision of 2/3 of the stales 
represented at the meeting. 

If the resolutions are passed, repurchase of sfaares in NOMURA- 
PRUDENTIAL FUND PART n will cease with effect from the date of the 
meeting and repurchase orders will be accepted until March 30, 1994. 

In order to attend the Meeting of NOMURA PRUDENTIAL FUND PART 
IL owners of bearer shares will have to deposit (heir shares five dear days 
before the Meeting at the registered office of the Company or with Basque 
Internationale k Luxembourg S.A., 2, boulevard Royal, L-29S3 
Luxembourg. 

The Board of Directors 


Mfc INTER NATIONAL*** I 

BusinessWeek 


“7 

, - A 


This week’s topics: 

0 Italy: A New Economic Era? 

0 Can Air France Control Its Spin? 

O Korean Cars Rock Europe's Market 
O Japanese Buy Into The U.S. Info Highway 
O Executive Pay Is Soaring— Again 


Now available at your newsstand! 


BusinessWeek International 
14, av d'Oochy, CH-1006 Uosaima Tel. 41-21-617-4411 

For subscriptions call UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523*293 9 


ny*s largest commercial hanlc criti- 
ozed the Bundesbank on Sunday 
for its reluctance to lower interest 
rates, Reuters reported from 
Frankfurt 


The chief economist of Germa- 


Norbert Walter, of Deutsche 
Bank, wrote in the newspaper 
Frankfurter AUgememe Sonntags- 
zdtung that retreating inflation 
and the signing of wage agreements 
with labor unions leave the central 
bank room to cut rates. 

“What is hindering a swift reduc- 
tion of short-term interest rates 
which are set by the Bundesbank?” 
Mr. Waller said. 

In another newspaper, the BQd, 
Gunter Rexnodt, the economics 
minister of Germany, predicted un- 
employment would fall bdow 4.0 
miffion people in 1995 but that more 
jobs would be lost this year. German 
unemployment stood at 4.04 million 
people in February. 


Euromarls 
At a Glance 


Eurobond YMds 

Mar IBMaf 11 YrMfhYrlow 


ux. 1 . ion term 

6X0 

652 

610 

6X1 

UJL I. mim term 

AX0 

5M 

6X1 

545 

U4.I, start term 

5X0 

542 

5X3 

4X8 

Ptaedsslerttag 

7X8 

679 

7X8 

626 

Ftetch Mncs 

651 

644 

656 

5J7 

RetaeBni 

M 2 

848 

SM 

731 

Dantskkraea 

654 

655 

659 

620 

SwedUfekraee 

IAS 

740 

745 

7JM 

ECU. tong term 

6X1 

6 J 8 

6?1 

618 

ECU. mdm term 

648 

644 

648 

5X1 

cno .1 

7 M 

742 

718 

6X0 

Aes.i 

754 

7X5 

734 

659 

nz.s 

6 » 

677 

6X7 

699 

Yen 

3J6 

3X6 

M7 

2X7 


Source: Luxembourg Slock Exchonoe. 


March 17 


Weekly Soles 

I’nmm Market 

CeM 
t NotfE S 

StraUbfa 30958 29150 1.PU0 2.133.10 

Camrt 2550 0,99 394J0 1X0770 

FRHs MMO 72X0 90170 <77X0 

ECP 4X73X0 3X9670 14X45X0 4X9740 

TOW 5X54X0 3X52.10 17XULM 9X1540 

Secondary Mortal 

Cede! Ei 
I MOM S Kont 

11XC0X0 25X99X0 31X45.10 35444.10 
557X0 5R70 2X4950 1X2640 

75KL10 280470 25X29X0 4.14UO 
9.13690 11X67X0 TO304X9 27861X0 
27X14X0 49X46X0 69939X0 <7X74X9 


CURRENCY AND CAPITAL MARKET SERVICES 




Currency Management Corporation Pic 

Winchester House, 77 Loudon WaD - London BC2M 5ND 
TeL 071-382 9745 Fax: 071-382 9487 


FOREIGN EXCHANGE & GOLD 


24 Hour London Pealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Daily Fax Sheet 
Can for further information & brochure 


■ Attention Futures Traders* 


US$29 OK ZmESS ROUND TURPI 
* Puce Obmu Toll Fux WoudWise • SS.000 Mxkhojm Acconrr 
■ Pn co niT rot Yomg Tumw ■ Ita Quote Serna Oim 
'Put Moca MoozlU TmUtmUa oa Howl* G«< Mon Prom P*rTzwl« Bad 
MM ra ptata MM too, wzlti, pfcaoa or bats 
. tmaaro Ow» u. Banna Botaz, 23 Sr Ci ump o Otm, 
Smn 2, Imino Tn +3S3 18 78SOM Fix + 353 lfi 7S6I23 


Duff Forecasts and Market Myths for 1994 

The US dollar v.il! soa*. donation will continue, geld S moil commcd.!i*s 
won I rise. Japan j economy & slock ma+.el wiil be .weak You d.d 
riOT ;ecd Ihd in Fu.'iOf Morey ■ Iconoclastic irivcslment loiter. 

Cs'i Hy.o -n M3J *o- c to-rpie .j -. jp :o"co on y) ct Cricn Arciysx ltd, 

J 5*c-:o« 5’roo‘ io-cs.-, v.'iJ'hD u< 'oi lond&n 7’ -iisi 4941 

tC'l f> go e-‘c* 7t -43? 4966 o f-MfBX Wc-er: 


European 

PRICEBUSTER 

Call Anytime 


O UVE Data From arcxto S10/day O 
O EOD Data lor $ 5/Day O 
O 1 30+ Software Applications O 

On Signal 

On London ® 44 + 71 2313554 


F1NTECH ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD. i 


14 Mgh Street, Windsor, England SL4 1LD 

PROFESSIONAL CURRB^CY MANAGHiS 
Highly Rated Computer Based Technical Sendee 

* Currency Fund Management (S.FA. Members} 

+ Corporate Advisory Services *14 Year Audited Track Record 




ft 

LONDON & GLOBAL 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE PLC 


PREMIER SPECULATION SERVICE 


QUOTE UP TO 100 MILLION USS 

Top floor, Ccuneo House, 1 1 Bear Street, London WC2H 7AS 

TeL- (071J 839 6161 Fate 1071) 839 2414 



^ Competitive Prices 
>/ Daily Fax Service 

TEl 071-931 9188 / FAX 071-931 7119 

S0v£ 3 v=:GN ;FO".EXi LTD 


24HR FOREIGN EXCHANGE 


strowm 

CBenrt. 

FUNS 

60* 

TOM 


Source: Euraclear. Cadet 


Ubor Rate* 


March 16 


1-cnoitft) 

hamb 

trneen 

UA.S 

3»m 

m 

M 

Pewtscta Marti 5lSrt6 

5 13/16 

511/16 . 

Peend sterling 

5W 

5V. 

53/16 ' 

French franc 

6% 

6U 

6M 1 

ECU 

67/16 

616 

6% 

Yen 

2 9/16 

2% 

Zft 1 


Sources: Lhr/Os Bonk, Reuters. 


The rea/-Hme information svi 
preferred by Institutions ana 


stem 

now 


available to traders at home. Unrivaled coverage at an unrivaled 


price. Futures • Options • FX • Energy • Commodities • Metals 
News ■ Full Charting & Technical Analysis from 


r , our Worldwide 

coverage - available vra Satellite through Europe. 

CaH FtriureSource TeL: +44 71-867 8867 Fax: +44 71-867 1364 


For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact 
PATRICK FALCONER in London 
Tel: (44) 718364802 

Fax: (44) 71 2402254 


itcralb^^Srlbunc 


Baer Holding Ltd. 


From strength to strength 

in 1993 


Consolidated Key Figures 



1992 

1993 

Owige 

% 

Net profit 

Sfir. a 

68 

147 

+117 

Cashflow 

St. m 

118 

225 

+ 91 

Return on equfcy 

% 

10.4 

1R4 

+ 77 

Total assets 

SFr.bn 

63 

7.7 

+ 23 

Equity 

SFr. m 

674 

919 

+ 36 

Staff 


1387 

1438 

+ 4 


□tents' assets 

Sr.be 

33-0 

44.9 

+ 36 

Mutual funds 

Sr.bn 

3.1 

5.4 

+ 77 


The Julius Baer Group often services tn 
Investment advtoc and asset management - 
for both private and Institutional dlents 
worldwide - as well as In brokerage and 
foreign exchange trading. The flagship of 
the Group is Bank Julius Baer, founded 
In 1 890. 


JEM3 


BAER HOLDING LTD. 


Bahnhofttmse 38, P.O. Box, 8010 Zurich, 
Tel. (1) 221 20 35, Fax (1) 22120 26 


Zurich Genera Frankfurt Lenten New York Hong tong 


I 


i 


§ &B-S Bio-Q’ K-a.h'ft n * a 




The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, March 21 - March 26 


\}f\ u M W* M ,!• h)ii M ; l w ; 


A aehmeMa of tNa week's economic ana 
BiWtClil event* canpMtor ttmtottmo- 
tonal Hero*) Tribune by BkHtntorg Bim- 

nan New* 

jggfgljjO 

* Marat) 11 Hang Kang February 
consumer price Index flguiea. 
Kaohatung, Taforan Advanced Semi- 
eonduowr Engineering Inc. to now annu- 
al tfiaraftokfen matting. 

■ an ting* e xport ed OTIC Paoffle. Hong- 
kong Land Holding*, Playmate* Proper- 
Dee. Playmates Toys. TeJeviaton Broad- 
com. 

• Moralist Canberra Bureau ofAgri- 
oidturel Reaaarob refeoaae quarterly re- 
port on commodlllea. 

Hong Kong 1994 Pan Asia Satellite and 
Cable Tatortaton Conference end Exhibi- 
tion beglne. Through March 34. 

Eaminga ea p ac t ad Mandarin Oriental 
MamaUonflL 

a Merab 13 Hang Kong Vietnam 
Busineea Aaaooiation to hold seminar on 
Vietnam's infrastructure. 

Hong Kong Barclays de Zoom Wedd to 
noW GteM Future* Conference. 

Barnlnga expec te d Jardina MaVwaon 
H oldJnga 

a Marnh 14 Bydray Waatpao-Maf- 

boume institute leading economic Indica- 
tor tor January. Forecut Rtee of 0.9 per- 
cent. 

Waffington February merchandise trade 
data. Forecast: Surplus to widen to 200 
minion Now Zealand doners. 

Taiwan Taipei International Electronics 
Spring Shaw begins at Taipei World 
Trade Canter. Through March SB. 
Eaminga expected Cheung Kong, 
a March 30 Hang Keng January r» 
tall sales. 

Hong Keng Gary Wilson, co-chairman 
of nyva (no. and North weal Amines, to 
speak at American Chamber or Com- 
merce In Hong Kong. 

Singapore Lecture on “APEC. Nafta 
and AFTA" by Or. C. Fred Bergsten. 
Chairmen of the "Eminent Persons 
Group" at Goodwood Park Hotel at 3.-00 
P.M. 

iurspt 

e ta pae tad Ms week Copanhagan- 

Psbruary consumer price index. Fore- 


cast: Up 0.4 percent in month, up i.g 
percent in year. 

Home January Industrial production. 
Forecast: Up 0.4 peroent in month. 

Rone January producer prioeindex. Up 
3.7 peroent In year. 

Frankfurt January current account. 
Forecast; Deficit of 1.0 a Won Deutsche 
mama. 

Frankfurt Preliminary M«/ch cost ot liv- 
ing. Forecast. Up 03 percent te month, up 
33 percent in year. 

Frankfurt February M-3 Irom fourth 
quarter base. Forecast: Up 1 B.O percent te 
month. 

e March 31 Brussels EU Finance 
Ministers meet to discuss minimum with- 
holding taxes In the EU. 
e Marnh aa Amsterdam January pro- 
ducer pries mdsx. 

Earning* a sp ected Royal Pakhoad NV, 
Bows tar, Renault V.i„ Hoeohat 
e Marnh 13 London February retail 
price Index. Forecast Up 0.4 peroam in 
month, up 23 peroent in year. Excluding 
mortgage Interest payments, Forecast: 
Up 2.6 paresnt m month. 

Eaminga a a pseiad Royal KNP Bacqus 
Nationals de Peris. 

e March 84 Amsterdam Government 
begins national debate on economy. 

Paris Fourth-quarter final gross domes- 
ife product 

Earning* e xp ected Bayerischa Vereme- 
bank, Veoa. Unde. Praueaag. Volks- 
wagen, Reckitt 6 Col man, Credit Lyon- 
nais. 

e March 31 Frankfurt French finan- 
cial markets conference. Bundesbank 
PreaWant Hone Tietmeyer end Bank of 
Frame Prestdem Jeen-aaude Trtchof to 

apeak. 

Geneva OPEC meeting opens. 

Lo n don March Confeder a tion of British 
Industry monthly distributive trends. 


NSW Orient Howard Web Energy Con- 
ference features presentation* from 160 
energy companw. Through March 24, 
Kingston, Ontario Devaioptng export 
mtrkdtS conference at by Quean's Uni- 
versity School of Business- Through 
March 25. 

• March 91 Washington The Securi- 
ties Industry Association notd* Ita a aoon d 
annual government rotation* conference. 
Through March 23. 

Buenos Aires mtaramerioan Develop- 
ment Bank and Argentina sign co ntr acts 
for loans totaling 891 5 ml Bon for Infra- 
■tructura, environmen t al, technology end 
export financing protect*. 

Baa Paulo inflation for second weak In 
March. Outlook: Expected to rise from 
36.67 percent. 

Ottawa January retail salsa. 

Toronto Wal-Mart Inc. axecutivae will 
brief the madia an the ratal lore plana for 
Us operations In Canada. 

Loa Angeles 66th Annual Academy 
Awards ceremony, 



Amwio— 

a Expected (hie week Earnings- 

Getty Petroleum, WD-40. 

e Marsh 90 Lee Vegas National As- 
sociation of Broadcast e rs annual conven- 
tion. 

Austin, Texas Southcoast Capital Carp, 
hoids Ita sopond annual Texas Growth 
Stock Conference writn presentations by 
Bombay Co.. Fred's tnc., Oracle Carp., 30 
Systems Unit Coro- Through March 23. 


Las Vegas National Association of 
Broadcasters Multimedia World trade 
snow, featuring new audio-video prod- 
ucts from Sony, next refsaaea of Hewlett- 
Packard's "video fuksbox," Through 
March 24. 

Phoenfar Standard 6 Poors hoWa tneur* 
anco seminar covering capital formation, 
property end casualty market, BAP'a 
methods tor setting dMms-paying ratings 
and asset liability management- Through 
March 22. 

Washington Results expected hem the 
weekend's intamationrt Brotherhood of 
Teamalera strike authorisation vote 


DOLLAR: Optimists Banking on Rate Differentials 


Continued from Page 9 

the 225-point German advantage 
at the start of February. 

‘There’s no doubt that dollar 
holders have bailed out of the mar- 
ket," said Andres Drobny, at CS 
First Boston in London. “But that’s 
a healthy event. When everyone 
was long dollars, the currency had 
no room to move up. Now that 
we've got a two-way market, there's 
more potential for a rally." 

Rainer Marian, at Credit Suisse 
in Zurich, said the market was 
“preparing a base for a rally that 
should take the dollar to 1.8000 
DM by autumn.’' Mr. Klath said he 
expected the U.S. currency to be 
even higher by year-end, trading at 
more than 1.9000 DM. 

There's lots of talk in the market 


that the dollar could trade down to 
1.5500 DM, and that's good." Mr. 
Marian said. Tf everyone expects 
the dollar to go higher then it's re- 
flected in the price. With sentiment 
more ambiguous it makes it easier 
for the dollar to up." 

His only proviso is that the dol- 
lar must hold above 1.6750 DM. A 
break below that would damage the 
outlook. 

The dollar pessimists agree that at 
present, the dollar is only trading at 
the bottom of a long enduring trad- 
ing range, but they see its inability to 
perform as expected an the back of 
higher U.S. interest rates as a har- 
binger for mote disappointment. 

The dollar is in alosc-lose situa- 
tion." said John. R. Taylor Jr„ of 
International Foreign Exchange 
Concepts Inc., a New York-based 


consulting firm. "As the U.S. econ- 
omy expands the Fed will tighten, 
and rising interest rates will unset- 
tle the bond market, which will 
cause a sell-off in the equities mar- 
ket and weaken the dollar as invest- 
ment capital flows out of the Unit- 
ed States. 

"The market is schizoid about 
higher U.S. interest rates. Most 

a le think it will drive the dollar 
a-, but the major impact will be 
an increase of long-term capital 
outflows and a weakening dollar." 

Mr. Taylor said he expected the 
dollar to fall "quite low," in a 
downtrend that will last through 
summer. 

While it is apparent that the dol- 
lar has lost its sizzle, European bend 
and equity prices are still falling. 


■gams 23 trucking companies included 
In the National Master Fralgm Agreement 

• Merab 11 Washington Th* Federal 
Open Market Commutes, the Ftidt group 
that aeta Inter**!- ran poucy, meets. 
Washington Merchandise trade dafldt 
for January. 

Non York Jupnu CemmuNcationa Co. 
hddstw^day c o nfers nos on on-line ser- 
vice* Industry and options for major ma- 
dia playan seating to antar it 
Hawaii Privat e s ector masting or U.8. 
and Japanese semiconductor makers 
mast under terms of 1991 trade accord. 
Eaminga expected Conagri lrw., Or*- 
cte flyaa ma 

■ Marsh ia Washington February 
. durable goods order*. 

Palm Beech. Florida NaiWtst Securities 
and the National Association of Real Ba- 
tata Investment Trues* stvts Its annual 
two-day inmtuttonal Investor forum with 
presentations from more than 80 r*ai es- 
tate eompante*. 

Eaminga ar ps uteri Brodorbund Soft- 
ware. Kaufman a Brood Heme, Pep Boya- 
Mmny, Mo* a jack, Seagram. 

a Merab 94 Washington imtitiwsak- 

ly MMl unamptoymant compensation in- 
surinoa claims. 

Mexico CHy Inflation ter the ItoR half of 
March. Outlook: Up between 0.1 percent 
and 0.3 peroent 

Now Yen International Buenos* Ma- 
chine* Corp. Chairman Lou la V. Qarsinar 
aohadulas doasd-door briefly with mo- 
ly«*. Ms llrat sines announcing the com- 
pany's record second quwur ten of 98.1 

bKlofl last July. 

Eaminga expected Darn Food* Co., 
Gonersl Hoot Corp. 

aMerebU Washington NrtOfUJAe- 
aodatlon of Raster* meases Misting 
home salsa ter February. 

HMMB*. Maryland a Food and Drug 
Administration advisory committee dis- 
cusses Qtnsntech Inc,' application ter 
Actlvaaa, a blood dot dlaadvar, for a new 
ocee regimen. 

B u a noa Abes Banco da Q*taa y Boo- 
ne**** 8A hokta sharohotean moating. 
Outlook; Bharaholdara wta be asked to 
■pprwt capital toeroasa which W pwmt 
the bwut to til* a registration statement 
with the U.S. 6EC for laaua of common 
stock and oonvertUs bonds. 


Saudia Bargains 
For U.S. Planes 

Reuters 

DUBAI — Saudia, Saudi Ara- 
bia's national airline, started nego- 
tiations in Jidda on Sunday with 
Boeing Co. and McDonnell Doug- 
las Cop. on its planned purchase 
of about 50 U.S.-built aircraft 
worth $6 billion. 

Industry sources said Saudia was 
looking for three classes of planes. 
The airline appears inclined buy at 
least 10 Boeing 747 -400s initially, 
for long-range flights, and could buy 
an additional 10, the sources said, i 

McDonnell Douglas and Boeing 
also are competing to meet Sou- 
dia’s requirement for 10 to 15 300- 
seat aircraft and 25 to 30 150-seat 
airplanes for shorter flights. 


0TC Consolidated trading (or weak 
ended Friday, March 18. 
(Continued) 


Dtv vu hwi im Oh on 



&TmT :U4itt4i 

LEGS 1 —283*31* UVi 2Ste -to 

.LdTSj .14 2.B *14 ito ito M —to 
UGPBc - OS EM. 31 Vj 22 to -to 

LSBNC J3 U 3822 21 3 

tS!" - •- 

Locbna n Xi *59 2*to 2dto zrr, 
Lotted** - SSISto ITto llto -t 

UOdOPr .12 l3 10*5 9to tto Vto -to 
LooyLuck _ 179?1lto 9to into — te 

LOTOVAS - 3733 Vh. 3W» 2te -to 

t®? i§oX4 iSfaw rrto m* —to 

t»v "sSftftft -to 

LomR»l >110*939 35to38to-lto 

LCTX3TTS A0 13 175145 Cto 44to _ 
Lane* .94 A7 37*6 MW 1M 20 VI -to 
Land! ~ 4S0 13to 12to llto —to 

uondcrtr - IBSMtoE 23 Vj «-te 

ustvcbc t - u ito a Sto *to 

LdmWteh - 448HSto 27to -to 

tSEP =25SSSto3StoT» 

Me i S3S2i ? o = 

feSSIS? 

LavrriTc M 1749Sl*to Mto 15to— 1 

Loaracs -1SU7 7to ito ito +1to 

Lontcae _10£7i i9to lito lito +Tto 


sjrto-rUto 


- 3731 Vh. 3W» Ito -to 

1.1 143 rnto IVto 30 -to 

X4 IMtSto I7to ITto —to 

- F .ft -to 


Lone* 

Lond! 

Loncktir 

UimkBc 

LdmkGPh 

Londrvi 

Larvntr 

Lonrwf 

i S(8£ 

La»*rPr 

LdwmTc 


23to ♦to 
ito -to 
»to -to 
M —to 
IM *Vl 


Lame » _jo£7i i9to lito isto +th 

Lourtsci 34a 14 1S13to 1216 13to -to 
LawrSfi _ 457 J 3W Sto ♦to 

LBWW Al U 949 2ito 25to 24 to -2to 
LwvrT* .12 3 200*17 19M 14Mt —to 

Lam. « 294 iH ito Mfi —Vh 

LsodrFn - 129B 20to 19to 19*. -to 

UnaCa -22*23 19 I5to lito —to 

LKMWoy _ 1149 14 13to 13to —to 

LsoSokj _ 1*83 lito 1 0 to lOto —to 

Lsdsc Jit 5J *11 10 I 10 ♦Ito 
Laduar* - 1*5 l3Vi I4to ISto +to 

Learnt _30*9B3«to 31*4 32 —Ito 

LsSbl — 9*2 9 7V, 7 Vl — 1 

LtoGrp _ 922 Ws Wta Wi, *to 

LHCSl _ 110314 lito lito —to 

lmw _ 923 13 V4 iito me -to 

LMCdS - <227 2* to 22to 23to *to 

LSXlnoS JO 7J> 3373 lito 1*to ISVl ‘VS 

LblyBc JQ 2J 399 Eto TIVt 32V* — Mi 

UbBcOK 76 U 40 27to 26to 26to - 

LtUrH A J* Z7 99 tow into lOto *Vt 

UbMedA . 12244 23to 7)to 23to «-1to 

UbMOopf LD0 7.7 2 71 

LBtaNB* JSoXi 1311 30V, Mto 30to +1W 
UbfiyTc .. 10*7 9to Sto *to -to 

Lfdo » *20 Sto 2 2to +to 


_.!14H lito 
A0 X3 IfiS !7_V» 





INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. I 



If you enjoy reading the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get it at home ? 
Someday delivery avalabie 
in key U.S. cities. 

CdH (1)800 882 2884 

(In NawTsm xdk 919 739 3990) 

^trjjSSSfefrim 


^ INTERDEAN 

FOE A RQ BDMAIE CAU. 

PARIS (1) 39201400 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 





I ffSk x 

Ltecor* ^ 

LteOte 

LMnoS 

L/Hoon* _ 

Ltoand _ 

LPgte* JO 1.4 

Lmcoree Z. 

uocFa 

LmcSB 140 XI 
Linen i j2 is 
UrtcSH J9t1lf 
LMdbro JO XI 

LtSarTc M 3 


M 1444 4 ito 5to 

« 1*31 < 3to 3to —iS. 

^ 1*0 *W *W 49k —VS, 

JO U X771 1714 14 14to —to 

^ 1*034 14 lito 11to-2to 

_ 120* ito 7to ttk *lto 

« 1B34 11 9to 10 —to 

^ 1182 4M 4Vfc 4H *>* 

- 192 lito lOto lito .Mi 

^ 2MUto 13 13to „ 

JO 1.4 1334 25V, Mto Mto —to 

-.8901111^109 lioto— to 
» 1802 2414 23to 23to —to 


- 2144 Mto nto 13to -to 

JO XI 91 53 51 site — to 

J2 X? 8381 17 ISto 14to —to 

J9tl£l *4 s 4H ito —to 

JO XI 41* *te ito ito *H 

1734 34to 31to 3H4 +5 


te LbWOrTc M 3l4B93*9te <5to 

to ypSalif 1.9* lOP 4 |2419to If 
V4 LT1 _ 4371 9to ito 

3 SE* s ^ .sails r 

to Ulftewf „ 1217U lito 


AGBiCE CHAMPS aYSES 

yedriob In fwnbhad gportiTmix 


KT US MV YOU) Salad a kwaty i proriab In fiimWwd oportnyib, 
W te rim w l loks Otnavo, Soeftwm raadwtiUoracOnKrttaerdsoro. 

^ T4J1142 25 32 25 

RhomW fit 41-21-399 00 49. Fax (!) 45 63 3709 

tag 41-11-329 00 S9. 


AUTO RENTALS 


Off ROM MU AUTO 
WffiCBOFFSIS 
SOCIAL OFFS ■ 7 DAYS, FF 1000 
PAW TH] ( 1)43 17 37 04 


LEGAL SERVICES 


LttfMwl „ 12 ITto 1414 

H23? :imK 7to 

LoJOdc _31S42 Ute Ito 

Loan* * 877 12to Tito 

LodBEM Z 3*17 Mto 1W 

Loowena 04 »i97 2*to 3*> 

Uwwr utn „ 1*92 ii to late 

Ltxrico ^ m 7te ito 

Lomck _ 4522 (to Sto 

LondOvr __ _ 3WMto is 

Landim jsiu itioto toto 

m =BFF 

tsr 6 

KB* 40 22 i?fftl B 4 W 

Lufkin 40 13 12* lito IS 

tsSn, 10811" 


HiS 

B" :8 


Vt ^., 

V vJL.-l 

' 

Vr-rTt 

Vx-iVi 


J 140 13te I2to Mte * 

: ,S »inJ “to ITto * 

nSSS! X a = 

.21442 lito Ito 11 +* 


JO 22 H ft ft ft Ift 
JO 13 134 1IH IS IS —to 


_ 153813 lito 14M — Vh 
_ 114 11U 91* 9te— ito 


2C 20 
21 2114 

27to 289V 

^ SiJ 

3*to 
Mto 
*to 
lito 
*ito. 


i7to 
2Sto 

i“.J! S 

ito 

IK" 

37te 
ITto 

4ito 44 

ito 41* 

7to ito 
22 to n* 

9H 
ito 



[CONFERENCES, 
COURSES 
AND 

EXHIBITIONS 



SftB 

fcfc 

% U 
ft ft 

»r 

ft 

23 

ft 

■to 


APRIL 12-13 


EUROPEAN AIR TRANSPORT WITHIN THE SINGLE MARKET 
Expanding Horizons - The First Year & Beyond 
BRUSSELS - SHERATON HOTEL. AND TOWERS 
IntmaJonaj conference sponsored by the European Commission, examining 
th ecfeaofthe M* 1 ** °n *e European airaansport Industry, Its IntemattonaJ 

cwnpetttois and recommendations the deCroo Committee of Wise Men. 
Speakersjndude Herman de Oroo. The EC Transport Commissioner and 
Senior Government. Regulatory and Industry Directors. 

For Futtfur information contact 
AERONAUTfCA COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED 
Europe & International - Clive Rlgden 
Tel.: +44-81-893-3795 - Rj* +44-81-893-3796 
North America - Jeremy Cambrill- Tel.: Volce/Fa* 1-614 8989017 


INTERESTS) IN 

the IiYramuoNAL Real Estate Market? 
Rluj 

The Real Estate 
Markbtplace 

EYEBY FRIDAY IN THE IHT FORj 
Worldwide Real estate for 


ate: Consultants 


REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 


Usury Homes & Estates 


Vacation Reytals 


BRUSSELS 


April 18-20 


Argentina - Capital Markets & 
Corpo rat e Finance 


domestic institutions, the seminar 
wtll investigate the developments and 
opportunities that are 


speakers Indude the Minister of 
Finance. Governor and President of the 
SEC 

Further information: 

Euromoney, 

Tel.- *44 71 7798833 -Fkt +44 71 779 8835 


BUENOS AIRES 


JUNE 9-10 


Latin Amorim 
A New Iiiw eflB n ont p ai nter 

This, the fifth biennial conference on 
Latin America, will focus on trade and 
Investment opportunities 

in the region. 1 

Contact 

Brenda Hagetty, 
International Herald tribune, 
London. 

Tel.: (44 71)8364802 
Faa (44 71)836 0717 


LONDON 



April 21-22 


LONDON 


JUNE 15-16 


Oil £- Money: 

Asia and the Padflc 

The conference, one of Asia's leading 
energy forums, will be addressed by 
experts In the oil Industry from the 

woridover. 

CORMtii 

Brenda Hagerty, 
International Herald Tribune, 
London, 

Tel.: (44 71) 836 4802 
F« (44 71) 836 071 7 


SINGAPORE 


Washington & Worfd Business: 

Hie Oetieok for Cfobel Partnerohlp 
A distinguished group of speakers will 
debate the Implications of 
President Clinton's foreign and 
domestic economic policies for 
International business 

Contact 

Jane Benney, 

International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

Tel: (44 7IJ 8364803- Fee (4* 71 1 836 0717 


WASHINGTON 


JUNE 27 -AUGUST 5 



__ APRIL 13 


International Travel Retailing: 
New Technology - New Tactics 

Tlie fourth International Duty and Ito 
Ree Seminar will examine and assess 
the new developments taking place in. i 
the travel retailing industry. 

Contact: 

lane Benney, 

International Herald Tribune, 
London. 

TeL \44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (4471) 836 0717 


LONDON 


April 28-29 


Financial Markets 

In the MidtSe East Conformed 
Sponsored by the UK Government, the 
conference will provide a unique 
*pnim for delegates to meet leading . 
Players from the region, and tpp level 
experts from institutions outside tf* 
Middle East 

C oniact; 

The Conference Unit 
The Royal Institute of International Affeto 
Te?.. (M7II9J75700- F«c I44 7UHI 3W3 


LONDON 


TO ADVERTISE 
• PLEASE 
CONTACT PARIS 
ON FAX: 

{33-1)46 37 93 70 


LONDON 
















































































j 1 , - . 

Its 't 


r ft 3;. jjj 

>. 1 jJ - * v ri $ 

• < : '.'Ji.: *■: 

:■ §;..& 

• -N? 

., - 

s _ >'*•' 

■- 

• 

;. ■>■. S?m 

:<«:; bii 
* it.". 

i l ; 

: i 

• ii;:; t?*? 

■ 

-- - 

■ ■:: ■ Sp 

«;. - • I,- * 

■ •• 

JKjf * 

" ' a a' is? 
u a Si* 

, . y: ■*• 2 t. j 

1 

■ski: 

• v. V'rij 

j»s ; 7,r 

'•* »*. I' ; 

* ? 

u‘- ■, i 4 r 

:. . S'. J't 

’• 

■•• 1 \'Vy] jsi 
r-i 

’SKfti 

•steRii 

ji? 
i>: "■ | !• 

lint.! 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


Page 13 


MONDAY ” “ 

SPORTS 

[ Wales Loses to England but Wins 5 Nations Title Michael Andretti 

Stymies Mansell 

In Australia Prix 


■ Complied by Our Staff From bupatdia 

LONDON — England foiled 
. a Welsh grand slam by beating 
Wales, 15-8, at Twickenham, 
but failed to win by enough 
. points to prevent a Welsh tri- 
umph in the Five Nations rugby 
championship. 

Rory Underwood and Tim 
Rodber scored England's first 
tries in a year, and Nigel Walk- 
er replied with one for Wales. 

Both teams ended with 3 vic- 
tories and 1 loss. En gland need- 
ed to win by 16 points to secure 
the title. 

In the other match Saturday. 
France avoided the wooden 
spoon in the tour nam ent by 
stopping Scotland, 20-12. 

The first English try came 10 
minutes into the match. After 
the pack won the ball at mid- 
field^ Rob Andrew produced a 
pass that deliberately missed 
out two players and put center 
Phil de Glanville in flight 
through the Welsh defense. De 
Glanville held off two tackles 
before his short pass to Rory 
Underwood, who got past Ieuan 
Evans to race 25 meters and 
score. Andrew kicked the con- 
version and England led, 7-0. 

MeS Jenkins had a chance to 
cut England’s lead when de 
Glanville was penalized for not 
fc releasing, but the Welsh fly half 
sliced his 35-meter kick just 
wide. Five minutes later, Jen- 
kins floated a 35-meter kick be- 
; tween the posts after England 


had been penalized in a scrum. 

Three minutes after the break 

it was 12-3 when England’s pow- 
er and improvisation brought 
another try. Will Carling 
thought he had sewed a try in 
the corner but put a foot into 
touch before grounding the ball. 
Wales had the put-in from the 
line-out. but Rodber leaped to 
pluck the ball out of the air and 
dive over. 

Andrew scored on a 15-me:er 
kick in the 53d minute when 
Jenkins was penalized for vio- 
lent play underneath his own 
posts and England led 15-3. 

The English continued to 
press but the Welsh held them 
at bay and Walker’s try in the 
75ib minute came after some 
powerful front-row play. Ricky 
Evans was caught iust short of 
the Englisb line but received 
good support from John Da- 
vies. The bail was fed quickly to 
Walker, who had only 10 meters 
to run over the line. 

France won at Murrayfield in 
Edinburgh for the first tune in 
16 years. Jean-Luc Sadourny 
and Philippe Saiut-Andrc 
scored tries to lead France, 
leaving the Scots last in the 
championship standings. 

Thierry Lacroix kicked two 
penalties and a conversion, and 
Pierre Mantlaur scored another 
conversion as the French over- 
powered the Scots to replace 
Ireland in third place. 

(AP, Reuters) 



The Associated Press 

SURFERS PARADISE, Austra- 
lia — Michael Andretti kept cool 
after a prerace disagreement with 
Nigel Mansell and drove brilliantly 
in chaotic conditions to make a 
triumphant comeback to IndyCar 
racing by winning Sunday’s sea- 
son-opening Australian IndyCar 
Grand Prix. 

Andretti, who bad a disastrous 
year in Formula One racing in 
1993, took the lead from Mansell, 
the pole titter and defending cham- 
pion, on the first lap. He stayed in 
front until the race was halted after 
55 of the 65 scheduled laps because 
of darkness. 

Rain delays at the start, a need to 
sweep sand from the circuit and a 
five-car collision on the pace lap 
meant the race began two hours 
mH 20 miniu« l ate and cars slid all 
over the trade during the competi- 
tion. Only 14 of the 27 starters were 
still running at the end. 

Andretti's victory was the first 
for owner Chip Ganassi and for the 
Reynard riunapiy, which was mak- 
ing its series debuL Driving a Rey- 
nard-Ford, the 1991 season cham- 
pion finished 1:33 seconds ahead 
of second-placed Emerson Fitti- 


kmstioatea a ip-meter kick be- iraana m imrn place. Komunorn/tom pion finished 1*33 

; tween the posts after England (AP, Reuters) Welsh flanker Emvr Lewis barreling through the Engfkh Hpfcrw at Twi ckenham Fngland scored two fries, te first in over a year of second-placed 1 


The Hording Plea- Bargaining Marathon: Listening In on Both Sides 


s-, i'. 


■*•} By Jere Longman 

_ 5 >j ’ New York Times Service 

\ \ PORTLAND, Oregon — As lawyers on oppos- 
j'i ing sides of the Nancy Kerrigan assault case; 
s „ Norman W. Frink, the prosecutor, and Robert C 
’ ; Weaver Jr, the attorney for Tonya Harding, had 
™ i spoken almost daily for two months. 

Last Monday afternoon, they began a frenetic 
o* 48 hours of plea bargaining that ended only three 

• ; hours before Harding wafted into a courtroom 
■ \ and admitted guilt to a charge of hindering the 

prosecution. 

■ i: Frink characterized the. negotiations as “free- 
. wheeling,'’ while Weaver said it had been a period 
£ ■ “of not very much sleep.” 

* 5 ' The two attorneys met or spoke a dozen or so 


rimes between Monday and Wednesday, Weaver made a good deal 


felony conviction of Harding and acquired an ad- 
mistion that she had consp i red to impede the inqui- 
ry of the Kerrigan assault with her former husband, 
Jeff Gfllooly, and her bodyguard, Shawn EdcardL 

Harding also was assessed $160,000 in fines, 
court costs and charitable donations, and ha 
amateur skating career was effectively scuttled. 

Weaver, meanwhile, kept Harding out of jail. 
Instead of a prison term, she received three years’ 
probation and was ordered to perform 500 hours 
of community service. 

“Both tides took the low-risk approach to solv- 
ing the problem,'’ said Edward Jones, a Portland 
attorney who is president of the Oregon Criminal 
Defense Lawyers Association. “They both got 
something where they could walk away and say, 'I 


An indictment would have brought about an be before any were brought,” Weaver said. 


expensive, protracted disposition of the case and During their frequent conversations. Weaver 
attracted a disruptive media presence; Frink said. he became aware of the conditions that the 

Weaver said that a plea arrangement was a state might accept. 

ra0l,e * “ at>,mmr " d ■? — prosecutor for 12 years.” Weaver said. 


chance for Harding to resolve a “nightmare” and 
move on urith ha life. 


move on until ha life. 

By Monday, motivation for a plea arrangement 
had developed a certain uigency. Until then. 
Weaver had been occupied by lawsuits against the 
U.S. Olympic Committee and the U.S. Figure 
Skating Association. He had been successful on 
both counts, securing Harding’s place on the 
Olympic team and paving the way for ha to 
compete at the world championships in Japan. 

lien be turned his full attention to the criminal 
investigation of the Kerrigan case. A grand jury 


“A lot of things don’t have to be spoken.” 

On Monday, be said, “alter knowing what the 
parameters were, I communicated some vague 
toms that we would consider settling the case on.” 

Thus began 48 hours of fervid negotiations. 
Harding’s admission that she helped to cover up 
the plot to attack Kerrigan was a key point for 
Frink, because it appeared to contradict ha previ- 
ous statements. 

Harding first told authorities she knew nothing 


' ' said, “and everybody had to give afittie bit on this." 

In the end. both tides readied an agreement witl 
1 which they could be citisfiad. Frink obtained t 


Both Frink and Weava said they were confi- 
dent of their chances had the case gone to triaL So 
why did they settle for a plea bargain? 


report was due in a week, and there was a chance 1 about the attack. Lata she said she learned upon 


thin Harding would be indicted. 

“It was my view, and also I think it was Norm's, 
that if there was to be a pretrial resolution, it had to 


returning from the national championships Jan. 10 
that several people dose to ha were involved and 
had not notified authorities out of fear. 


“She had to admit that every public statement 
she emitted had been a lie,” Frink said. 

This is not completely accurate- Harding has 
said all along that she had no prim' knowledge of 
the plan to harm Kerrigan with a metal baton. She 
did not admit to any prior knowledge in the plea 
arrangement, and Weava has continued to intist 
that she had none; 

By forcing Harding to resign from the U.S. 
Figure Skating Association, which left ha ineligi- 
ble to compete at the world championships, Frink 
accomplished two things. 

First, be sought to do a favor for the skating 
association, which had been blocked from calling 
Harding before a disciplinary paneL More impor- 
tant, the revocation of ha skating membership 
and the ending of ha amateur career provided the 
most tangible evidence that Handing had been 
punished for ha admissi on of guil t. 


paldi of Brazil, who mounted a late 
charge in his Fenske Ilmor. 

Mario Andretti, Michael's fa- 
ther. was third in a Newman/Haas 
Lda-Ford. 

Mansell who won the Australian 
race last year in his IndvCar debut 
and went on to win the "PPG Indy- 
Car World Series, spun out twice 
dining the race and finished ninth 
in his Newman/Haas Lola-Ford. 

Andretti covered the 55 laps of 
the 2.795 mile (4.49-kilometer) 
Surfers Paradise street circuit in 1 
hour, 53 minutes and 52.770 sec- 
onds, an average speed of 80.994 
miles pa hour (130344 kilometers 
pa hour). 

He and Mansell tangled in the 
pits afta an aborted start, with 
Mansell claiming Andretti had cut 
him off during the pace lap. 

Andretti played down the dis- 
agreement. “A couple of things 
woe said and then we just went on 
with our jobs,” he said. 

Michael Knight, a spokesman 
for Mansell, said the En glishman 
had nothing to say about the inci- 
dent. 

Tm so happy to be back,” Mi- 
chael Andretti said of his return to 
the IndvCar ctrcuiL “What a day. 
We didn't miss a beak The car 
handled like a char m an day.” 


Popov Breaks 
His Mark Again 

The Associated Pass 

GELSENKIRCHEN, Ger- 
many — Alexander Popov of 
Russia bettered his own short- 
course world record Saturday 
in the 100 -meter freestyle with 
a time of 46.74 seconds al the 
Arena World Cup meet 

It was the fourth time this 
year that Popov, 22, has im- 
proved his short-course re- 
cord. Last weekend he swam 
the distance in 47.12 seconds 
in a World Cup meet in De- 
senzano, Italy. 

Raumundas Mazuolis of 
Lithuania finished second in 
in 4734, and SQko Guenzel of 
Germany was third in 4830. 


NASDAQ NATIONAL 


'■ OTC Consolidated trading for week 
;. ended Friday, March 18. 

(Contimied) 


Li. ?:■ 

>•" S a . • 

u.E 

jam 

Z'>\\ : N 

rlv 


ft*? rA 

K: 


• ‘ , 3oc to 

. NuVisn 

Ria J NuWst 

NuWtpf 

NucMet 

Nucisot 

NuKoce A 

Nutrmox 

NYCRpI 

Nvenr 

'■ r~ NvcorA 









Sales 

Div YM lOttsHWi Low Che 

- MIA 4 4V* 

_ 9410 2Vb Wb TVi. 
_ 17131 130 131 
JO 1.C 234 13 12 'A 12* 

_. 311 Sta Slfr 5% 

_ 2174 22>-i 7IW 22 
_ 795 12'.* 11H 12 
.85* 43 43 19 18V4 18* 

_ 106 tV- 4* 

.16 Al 766 3?* 3Vi 37fc 


15 16 +1 

4V, 5Vb - Vi 
21 W 21*6 — W 
189, 1BW -A* 
2BV6 29 'A -»* 
22 22 ■* _ 
111 * 12 \* ■»*, 
4*4 49k * ^ 

7Vl 8Ul 
dV. 4% _ 

28V. -2 
Wu *Vp 
11^ *lk 
11 -1* 
14VS 
24 'A 

63H -Ik 
11 -3 
lllk 

17V6 - 

31* »lk 
9% — 
36VS 

«W. —*4 

8>A -V4 

5 *** 

28 W +V4 
15W _ 

llVt— IV, 
12W — W 
261k +ljk 
lOVk -4fc 
I6'ik _ 
14V. *46 
9>* +'A 
32 «Vk 
29M. 

3«k 

to — »k 
259k *H 
241a - 

7W 
5 

71* — V) 

14 -W 
21 V* — V 
4Vk 

2V*r — Jk 
34W rVi 
41* - 

21 % +2»k 

ev, 

14V, — yi 
tVx +'A 
6W +'A 
20 V. * 21* 
141* - 1 . 
1QV, — yk 
7 V, — v, 
5V. 5H — W 
3W 3Mj *Vk 
149, 1416 —'M 
14* IMt, - 
10 lO'A — » 
71* 7V, _ 

4<* 4KS f*A 
33V. 34 

t7<* 29'A -J* 
9% VM -W 
ll»k 12>* 

59 Vi 59W-4£ 

12 I2*k —Vi 


Si =5 

PeorRv _ 1100 49k 4 4V6 

PeaWW JO 4 J 134 111* 101k 1016 - '.V 

penedrm _ 18915% 14 15 -1% 

PimAm _ 28 7% 7 7 

PunnE/i 2J0 7.1 355 31% 30% 31 — % 

PenTri _ 12141*13 14VS-.1V, 

PeonVa 1J0O 5.1 18035 33 35 -.2 

PennBc J4 2J 46 17% 16% 16% —46 

P*nril JCe J 763 7% 6% 4% 

Pontou-S J7 2J> 2119 37% 35 3*%— 1 

Pertch _ uns 6% 5% 6 — v* 

Fkmws, JO 1J) 1134 23% 20 20% —1% 

PcoBU JQ 1^ 42 26!/S 26 26V* -VS 

PeaScps AO 2.1 21 19V* 18V* 19V, *% 

PeapBOH 1.12 U 845 40 41 —1% 

PScWcr 1J6 28 270 48% 47 VS 4714 — V, 

PnooCT M 14 4468 11V* 10% 10% — % 

PeopCT pt*JS 6JS 508 68% 6S%— 2% 

PewBIC ABb 2.1 40 22% 23 23. 

PaoBMN _ 2634% n% 24% — V* 

PeooChC _ 139534% 33% 34 — VS 

PeopHr, _ 619811% 10% 10% *% 

PeopHId .92 12 «1741 38 41 -2% 

PSBBrc _ 624 5% 4% 5 — % 

PooSvPn 88 « 25 18*4 18% 18% _ 

PteopTMS 610910% 9% 10% 

Peopsft _ 8928 41** 34% 39V4 -4% 

PtrSdtv _ 4703 32% 27 30% *3% 

PHQIIr _ 2312 20 17% 18 —1 

PerFood _ 121224% 22 22% ^ 

Pedum _ 1018 4% 3% 3% —VS 

Ferlgos _ 186968 28% 22 24%— 3% 

PeraiMfl _ 6S9 11 9V* 10 — I 

_ 4905 5% 4% 5 — H 

PetcoAn _ 24936 16% 15% 159k _ 

PefrLng _ 4982 11% Ifllk 17 +% 

Petroco. _ 121 10% 9% 9% — Vk 

PefDv - 1218 2V» 2% 2W» *%, 

PtrlGeo - 681 38 36% 36% — *h 

pmaoTA JS 6 JS 519 9 8% 8V, = 

Petrfte 1.12 3.1 393 ^ 23% 36 

Petrmn — '06 jh. % % — Vv. 

P&fxMorl _ 10749 30V, 29 29% -% 

BBSS 

pRScS _ 543 11 1CPA 10% -V. 

PnllEnv _ 14 5V* 5% SVS 

pnojoecto AS X6XI739 13 12% 12% « % 

SnkRB JO 1J 8435 25% 23% 24% -% 

zoo 3R mi av* »% n% *S 

PnnxTe - 9274 4% 5% pk a-H 


□iv Yld 100s Utah Low Ctae Choc I 

I ?&.’i* 1*0 


0% YW 1*05 Low Ow Owe 
_ 21B2 9% SVS * _ 

„ 1567414% 9 10 —3% 

.12 Jk 2975 21 19% 21 +1% 

M 4J 5831 16% 14% 15 —1% 

_ 37612% 11% 12% *% 

A8blJ 107 27% 26% 27% -% 

- 646614% 13% 14% ♦% 


Pao&kIN 

PeooOic 

PeopHrt 

PeopHId 

PSBBrc 

PeoSuPfl 

PeopTeis 

PeopsR 

PerSPlv 

Percptr 

PerFood 

Perlipn 

Pertoos 

P orstOna 

Petfood 

PelcoAn 

PMrOiO 


_ 5811941% 
_ 5064 10% 
_ 217916% 

- 501 6 % 
^ 1799 3% 

M 32 377 19% 
_ 885 9% 
_ 59716% 
^3864129 
_ 1765 121k 

_ 1024 S'* 

JO 3 1903 24% 

- 38604 T9% 
_ 10780 40% 
_ 18476 Wu 
_ 1204 37% 

- 46 4% 

- 2303 25% 

_ 455415% 
_ 3145 5% 
_ 15 2% 

_ 194615% 

JOB J 650714 
JO 1.1 392718% 


36% 41 
7% 9 
14% 15% 
6 6 % 
2% 3% 
18% 19% 

ns 9% 

19% 14% 
25% 23% 
12 12% 

n% zftk 

17% 19% 
37% 39 
3 3% 

36% 37% 
4*k 4% 
34% 25% 
14*6 14% 
5% 5% 
2% 2% 
14% 15% 
14 15% 

17% 18% 



PtwtoCs 

Phoioroc 

PI ill In — - 

PhyCor — 

pnvCAs 

PtiyCDn — 

PhvCd 

PtiyslcHB 

Ptiysln t _ 

PicTel , - 

PletBos M 3.0 

FSemnj JO I 
Pinevlek M 1J 
PinkJn .. 
PincIFs J6 2J 

^ 2 3 

PrenSld .14 JS 
Plfwxr _ _ 


.. 9274 4% 5% 5% +H 

_ 16 7 6% 7 

_ 2973 5% 3% 5% * 1 VS 
3493 21% 19% 21% -1% 
_ 7509 34% 31% 34V4 -2% 
21813 30% 26% 30 *1 

„ 325 11 9V* 10% -% 

_ 2294 SVk 4% 4% -Vk 

5458 27% 24% 26% -IV* 

t _ 465 5% 3% 4% - Ik 

_ 8310 15 14 14% — H 

M 3.0 19 21% 21 21% -VS 

_ 1614 13% 13% t% 

J0I 4.0 32 8% 7V* 7Vl — % 

60 U 91 34 31 33 - % 

„ 38921% 20 20% -% 

J6 2J X48 2S 23 24 -I 
_ 3875 20 1 7% 19% ♦2 

JO .9 1508 22 21 21% ♦% 

M IJlSfSl** 32% ■»% -7% 
J6 1 J, \ 7248 37% 35% 36 — 1 

.14 JS 1423 28% 26% 28 ♦% 

_ 7849 27% 22% 25% *2 


JO 2J 506 23% 21% 22%-lVk 

PlonorSy — 151210% 9V« 10% - j, 

SroiLn^ _ 53 8% 8% 8% — % 

SSyts ... 305813% liv* 12% -1 

piStT? - 15190 14% 13% M -Vk 

prSvi H - 1 SSJSSf !HSf ?% **s' 

1.13 4.1 ?£* ?SS*Ll 


Ri8rnV;| 

Row 
ReotgrB 
ReposAu 1 
RepAu wt 


•P4F 
•PAM 
PCAIitt 
pasv 
PDA 
PDK 
PDKW1B 
POKwtC 
PDKp» 
‘PMCCom 
PMRCp 
PSBHold 
PSC 

PacRlni 

iPaar 

PacoAm 

PocBnks 

PncCrsr 

PocDunt 

BocPhy 

PbcSun 

PTetan 

PodfCA 

jPoetcB 

PocoPh 


21W« 
_ 94 6% 

J8 2 J 30710% 
_ 37311% 
_ 919 4% 
„ 3044 lVk 
„ 160 V u 
_ 850 % 

JO 15J 1017 3% 
_ 45B 15 
- « 

„ 29810% 

_ 1535 7% 
^.585 2% 

IJDbU 

Sfl “ &£i 

- 209 6Vi 
.61 r 3.9 1TWIMV 

„ 27653 18 
_ 190 9',’, 
1» S.J 642 25% 
_ 1340 54% 

_ 744053% 
AO 4 A 1101 9 
_ 134 12 

_ 18016 28% 

- «27 9% 
_ 3044 7% 

J9 3.1 *2328 % 

_ 3917 3V« 
„ 304 3% 

94 JJ) 923 17 

_ 2290 33% 
_ 541$ 13% 
_ 36266 33% 
_ 1M022% 

I 14? 2% 
64 20% 

1 an jj 7 75 

„ JJ3618% 
_ 2656 5% 
52 1.7 63 3?’S 

JO 10 11 » 

- r30 29. 

„ 604 

„ 104 7 

- 7,1 

1726 6% 

J4 A 683139 


l'Vu IWu -Nu 

A 6 — n 

9% 10% +% 

10% 11% yr 
4% 6% +% 

wu iyw *%* 

% >Ai -1A, 
■a % +Ve 
2 % 3% ♦% 
U% 14% - 

4% 

10 10 — 

7 7% — % 

1 % 2 % ;% 
55% 56 Vk — 1% 
4% 4% —A 
12*A 12% +JV 
6 6 % - % 
15% 1S% * J 
16 17% — % 

B% 8 % -% 

34% 25% - % 
51 54% -2 

50% n% »? 
8 % 8 % — % 
u% 77 vu 

36 28% 4 

8VS 9% -% 

f fe Ts 
2 % 2 % 
uu 33 A 

n n% -«% 
4«vs 33% ■ 3% 

19% 19% 

5 ta "ivs 

12 1? —1ft 

19% »% ' % 

27% 28V* - 

•K 35% — % 
6 ft 4^ -% 
v„ 'ft* ■ % 

sr -%i 


Plexus 
PoeBwn 
Pd&Au 
P oaaTrp 
PWvmeb 
Pomeroy 
PoncFa 
Pen*7 

if’ - 

g§s f% 

SSSS _ 167026 MVS 25% -1% 

PnnArta - 842 3% 2% 2% — % 

>J3 r 7A 83417% 17% 17«A -% 


_ 279 16% 15% 15% —ft 

40 2.1 205 19V* 18 19ft — IV* 

_ 4310% 9% 10% -ft 

_ jD5917ft 15 16ft — ft 

^ 147 5% 5% 5% ^ 

_ 579 12 1 0% lift —ft 

” M1 ^ So 2 % 2 % 2 % ♦% 

4005 7% 7ft 7ft —ft 

40 U 89511 10ft II -ft 


SlU i 8 8.8 -s 
I SSVJf « T~% 

_ 1800 17% 15% 17 ♦ % 

JBf) 1.2 2968 7% 6% 7% - ft 

iws »% —% 

wctr, j: 

SvJJSwi - 7M29% 25% W* +2% 

j» b « :5 

ESbSi _ 20128 20 19% 3D 

Sr rBWWW : 

^ So "h 

I 494914 19% 13ft * 1 

J4 Jt 1195 28% 28 28ft * ft 
M - 253425ft 23% 25 -IV* 
“ 476 5% 5ft 5ft - 
_ 10811 56% 51ft 52% - 1 
J2b 1 2 274 18% 17ft IBft * ft 

220 ;! soSft lift lift-u* 

464710V* 10 10% -% 

™ 2564 27% Z6’A 27H -ft 
{£252, _ 26539 7% 6ft TVS * ft 

. 144911% 10ft 11% *% 
n 23 189 30% Mft 30% * lft 

ESSHI J6 L7 90*M% Wft 20% •% 
jo w I(Bn SM 5% . % 

_ 245710% 10% 10% —ft 
: 506 mL 10% 1 M4 *C 

3 S ’SiSSLit-s 
Bfif S f ,S¥v, 'tS “Of -S 


prdePi 
prime 6 
Primoan 
PrmBce 

PrmcMd 

Prirtwfl 

PrmRflpf 

Prmdax 

PrtK«« 

Riroiw 

Pronet 

Precept 

precyi 

ProdOP 

Pro (fill 

PreoPn 

Pnrtofl 

ProgBV 

Progre 

PrepbJl 

ProtOg 

Protcon 

PralSY 

ProvBcP 

PrvBXif, 

PtovCp 

pnwJm 

Pro* (me 

Psicor 

PbSNCl 

PuloskP 

Puhak 

PulieEn 


| ReUHd 
RexSuis 
Rexhe«a 
RexorH 

I 

Rhenrrtl 
RtiodesJ 
RWbrJ 


mrnoBwt 

RfteerM 


RboiGoi 

RobMvr 

Rebec 

R o bords 

RWPtir 

RobNUB 

Robotvi 

RachCS 

RcMSpf 

RoCkHn 

Rock Ten 

RoefcvSh 

RooCnpti 

RsvtiPn 

RSvtfFpl 




_ 1385 9 8 SVk — % 

TJ 985 MM 17ft r*ft +ft 
J6e A *6 10 ID 10 _ 

I — 587 1 ft ft —Vi 

52 2JB 2911 19 18ft 18ft +% 

M 16 141 19% 18% 18% — % 

_ 4387 12ft 10ft 11 -ft 
_ 3405 ■ 5% 7% -2% 

_ 6368 1% 'Yu 1% — Vu 
.10 A 1914 18 17% 17% _ 

_ 11300 8% TV, 8% +Wu 
_ 262 4% 4% 4% —ft 

_ 212931V, 29 31V* *2 

„ 2211 19% 18% 18% — 1 
_ 6157 11% 9ft II +% 
_ 23 3ft 2% 2% —ft 

_ 1260 9'J, 8ft 9 — Vu 

_ 4302 6ft 6 6 «m 

_ 4404 7Vk 6ft 7 _ 

34 IJ X2B5 22V* 21% 21% -ft 
t _ 530 18 ink 18 ♦% 

J8 23 21514 13ft 14 +V* 

_ 1066 21% 19ft 20 ft -ft 

- 41288 14ft 12ft 14ft *3Vk 

- 408 10% 10 10VS -VS 

- 1827 31 27% 27ft— 3ft 

- 1110 16% 16 16% —% 

- 4747 21% 19ft 21% -1% 

- 21 13% 13 12 _ 

_ 251 10V. 9% 9% —ft 

- 66126% 24 26ft - lft 

-17560 US ft ft —Vs 

- 1544 ft ft, Vb - 

_ 40314 14 7% 8ft —5ft 

- 59114 13ft UV* -ft 

_ 1678 14 12% 13ft _ 

- 1970 14V* 13% 14 - 

- 117011 10 11 -V* 

- 1363 3ft 3% 3% 

MObAO 105 34ft 25 2S%— 1% 

.. 2398 10% 10V. 10% -ft 

_ 5072 20ft 18% 19% ♦% 

_ 1407 25% 23ft 25 -lft 

_ 2324 6!k 6 6ft —ft 

- 1230 5ft 5% SVk —ft 

_ 3935 4Vl, 3% 3>Vu -ft 

_ 2274 6% 6 6% -ft 

- 255 IVk lft, 1% -% 

- 44 Vk Vk ft - 

- 117416% 15% 16 ♦% 

J2 2J 197213% U 13% »% 

_ 169 lft lft lft —ft 

- 108 12% 12% 12% -% 

.We 1.1 152 4 3ft 3ft _ 

JS T.l 8310% 10% 10% — % 

- 579 3ft, 2ft 3 —ft 

_ 17619 17ft 18VS t% 

_ 91810ft 9% 10 —ft 

-21781 19% 16 16%— 3Vk ] 

Jll 4J 36712 10V* 10% —ft 

_ 519 20*4 19% » -% 

- 944 lft lft, lft, -»» 

- an % ft, Vk —ft, 

_ 6196 9% 9VS 9% — ft 

1.44c 1 .637168 94 90% 91 —2 

_ 6577 20% 19% 19% —ft 

_ 112 8ft 7% 7ft — % 

_ 2663 6ft 6% 6VS - 

_ 459 6 5 5ft 4% 

_ 13 1ft IV* lft 

- 211619% IBft 19% t% 

_ 2707 TO 9 9% —ft 

.16 25 151 6ft 6 6ft tft 

MB J 2092 17ft 16ft 17% +% 

_ 336 2ft 2H 2ft —ft 

-24011 10% 9% 10ft ■*% 

- 71319ft 17ft 17VS— 1% 

- 183 4% 4% 4ft —ft 

_ 45 9 8 8 —ft 

_ 150 % *u Vu — Vu 

- 4201 4% 3% yvn— *Va 

- 636617% 16% 16ft -ft 

JHl J 2278 22ft 21% 22% *% 
.56 1 A x267 36Vk 35 35V* —ft 

- 843 18% 17% 18% <■% 

_ 28 10% 9% 10% - 1 

J5 3J 18 6ft 6 Oft -ft 

140 2 JO 749473 69ft WVS-1VS 

A9 & 30818% 17% 17ft —ft 

335ft 33 35ft -lft 

JO U JOS 19 17 19 *2 

- 223 2ft lft 2ft - ft 

_ 920 9ft B% 9ft -ft 

_ 5215 35ft 32% 33ft— 1% 

.12 1.5 399 8 7% 7ft -ft 

- 4119 7 Oft 6ft -ft 

- 351414% 15ft 16 t % 

L75 5.7 1253Dft 99ft 30ft -lft 

lJObU 142 42 42 

_ 323617 16% 16% - 

- 48515% 14% 15ft — % 

_ 553 27% 3&*k 36ft —ft 

1JQ 23 989 45ft 44% 45 < % 

3JS 5.1 2564V* 43ft 43ft — Vk 

_ 24 6% 6% 6% 

.12 A 293933ft 39ft 30% — % 
•05*107 908 <Vs n% Ufa *v a 

- 3738 ft ft, % 

J»e 3 10660 16% 14ft 15ft — 1 

_ 39fi 6<A 5ft 6% * % 

- 330919ft 17 19ft tlft 

J6 1J 4933 X 33 -1 

- 307 9% 9% 9% 


SctoskW 

Sltvlslg 

SattytkH 

SooeTci 

StPranc* 

Stives H 

Stjud*! 

StMaryl 

StPaote 

Scfick 

SaltWaxl 
ISamUlyl 
1 viSartom 1 

LsandTc I 
SandFm 


Stacks OK Yld MftHiah Law Ctoe Chpe 
Rou» J* X7x3102 IBft 18 18ft -ft 

Rouse Pt 3J5 6J 377 S3V* 52V* 53% — % 
RyBPA I _ Ml 9ft 8ft 9ft +% 
RtrviCrtp _ 622 12% 11% lift— -IV* 

RCyOTC - 1640 7% 7 7 — V4 

Rufeind _ 31 11 10% 10% _ 

RuralMet _ 418 19% 18ft I8VS — % 

Ryt»Wk* JUa A 213 7% 7 7 — Vk 

Ryrrf _ 4481 8 % 7% BVk -ft 


- 9014% 13% 14% ♦% 

1JB 23 839 37% 37% — % 

-22651 15 12 14 -lft 

- 358 9 W 8ft 9ft *% 

- 9524 91ft l»ft 19ft — Vk 

_ 27 3ft 9ft 2ft —ft 

.12 A 2350 34% 23% 23% — % 
J2e1J 1228 18ft 17ft 18ft - 
_ 563 14 13% 13ft -ft 

_ 1729 2% 2ft 2% -Vk 
_ 2910 SVk TVS 7% — ft 
.10 J 3913% 12% 12% _ 

- 350 18ft 17ft 17% -Vk 

.11 3 8919 11% 19 -ft. 

-£2184 30V* 17 IBft— lft 
_ 153311 10% 10% — % 

- 1 4ft 4ft Oft — % 
TJO 3J 22625 56% 54% 55ft -ft I 

_ 496 15% 15 15 —ft | 

- 60016 15 15% -% 

_ 2724 27 25% 36% -ft 

- 465914% 13 13% - 

_ 3743 15ft 13% 14 —1% 

- 51916 15% 15% - 

.12 1.4 1700 9 8ft 8ft *% 
.40 1411227 29% 27% 29% -1 
.16 12 187 13% 12% 13 +% 

JO 1 A 1454 18% 18ft 18ft -ft 

- 3450 7 9 IS 18% - 

_ 1620 3 2% 9% 

- 513 2% 2 2% -% 

_ 970 >/m % % _ 

- 1449 2% lWu 2% -Vu 

JO 1J 880 17ft 15ft 17% *1% 
JO 15 9511ft 12ft 13ft -U 

X5» J 251 B 15V, 14ft 15% ♦% 
JMB A 2725 12V, 11*4 12 -% 


_ 6198 6% 6% 6% — Vk 

_ 3563 13% 12 13 -ft 

_ 131314% 13ft 14% —ft 

_ 469 7% 7ft 7ft 

- 1387 18 1 5% 18 +2% 

_ 1701 6 VS 5 5% +*4 

- 356 1% % ft 

- 4307 8% 7 «ft -ft 

_ 772 27% 26*4 27 _ 

- 131 22% 20V* 20'* —ft 
.OSe J 698 27% 36% 16% -ft 

- 451640% 37% « -1 

- 187828V* 26% 28ft -ft 

J6 1.1 2232 34 32ft B — % 

.16 1J> 4916% 16 16% -ft 

- 4982 IB 17% 17% -ft 

_ 11215V* 15 15 —ft 

- 120 3 2ft 3 _ 

- 4043 24 22% 24 -ft 

_ 716 7% 4% 7% — % 

JO 1J 4613% 11 11% - 

- 16491 36 33ft 34%— 1 

- 5197 9 8% 8% —ft 

_ 35 2ft 2ft 2ft — % 

52 2JJ 7680 25ft M 25ft *1% 

-1131714% 10% 14ft -2% 
A* 2.9 2015% 15 15 -V* 

_ 3831 19% 18 19% -lft 

1 JO W 694 86 86 — 4ft j 

AS 2J 164 18ft 18 18 — % 

- 219 22ft 21% 21% — % 

I JO 10 482 39% 36% 39% -3.. 

-6445528% 27% 28ft + % 
.46 3J 390 15 MV, 14V* -ft 

- 10313% 12% 13% -ft 

_ 1402 14 13 13% — % 

- 596 15ft 14 IS +1 
J6 JJ lOJHgk 10V* ,=>* -% 

M 10 74 32 30ft 31% -1% i 

150 5 A 46 29 27 27 — 

£\ 2J 6525% 19% 20% _ 

AO 10 119 14% 13ft T3ft _ 
.. 125837ft MV* 36ft - 
_ 183 4ft 3% 4ft -ft 

JO 17 18011% 11% 11% ♦% 
.121 4J 130 3ft 2Jk 2ft — 

It J ZfiMft 31 . 31 - 

_ 11622% 21% 21% - 
-37585 IV* lft. 1% -Vk 
_ 871 2 |% 2 -ft, 

1.13 4J 374 29% 27ft »% -ft 

- 398 8% 7 7% —lft 

_ 3017ft 19% 1M* - 

- 4503 8ft 7% 8ft —ft 
1 10565 14ft 13ft 14% -1% 

- 3178 6ft. 5^o ift. - 

- 40S 1% 7ft »% ■*% 

-2100 11% 11 11 ft -ft 

- 476 4% 3% 4% -% 

I 2869 27% 34% 24ft— 2 VS 
I 12718 16% 11 +1% 

_ 73210% 9% ID 

il 2.9 10694 29ft 27 29% -lft 

?* r 

Jib 14 27 15ft 15% 15% —ft 

- 6203 9ft 8 Bft — % 

I 85413ft 13% 13% - 

- 3226 31 27V. 28ft— 1 

- 692 2 1ft lft - 

.96 3J 325 30 28 29J* -ft 

_ 601017 IS lift —% 

- 515814ft 13% 13ft —ft 

- 735 7ft 7 7% rft 

- 178810 9 10 +% 

_ 739 2ft, 2 Zft, 

_ 5928 27% 25% 25% —ft 

_ 3352 9ft 8% 9ft *ft 
_ HO 8*6 8ft Wu --ft, 

- 175 4ft 3ft 3ft — 

_ 4740 13ft 12ft 12ft —% 

53 A 9403 54 50% 53ft - 1 

_ 7101 »% 7% 8V* -ft 
_ 786 6 5% Sft —% 

- 621 IWu 1% I' 1 *, +ft* 
110921 10 9ft « -% 

- 701 10% 9% 10% ~ 

-1751613% 12% 13 * % 

I 34« 9% 8ft 9ft -1% 

^? 8 f 3* » =S 

J6 2 A 1679 22ft 31% 23% +1 
_ 2691 6% 5ft 5% -ft 
jjj .1 331038% 36 28% - lft 

- 616311% 9ft 11% -1 

I 5M 4ft 4% 4ft -Vk 

- 84 % ft % iTk 


Srranfld 

smttiF 

SnapBvs 


- - Sales - 

OK YM lOOsHMl Low CMe Ow Stacks Kv 

.16 2.1 27 7ft 6% 7to - Sumf-W 

- 180922 21% 21% -ft SuroTc 

-97736 35 21V* 23ft— 1 SurvTc 

-13935 27ft 20ft 25 1 /.— 2% SusnBns 1J0 
_ 3164 9% 7ft 7ft —ft SutTRfiC 


Sales 

Yld IBbHigh Low Owe Owe Stacks 
_ 607 3% 2% 3% *Vfc TrtdMic 
_ 536 4% 3ft 4 -ft Trimark 

_ 138 13% 12 13% —ft Trimble 

Al 39325ft 24% 24% —Vi Trimed 
_ 1543 32% 28 32% *2% Trtnzic 


OK YM lOOsWBb 
_ 190 6% 
_ 241 11% 
_ 810 10% 
- 765515% 

_ 2745 4% 


Sattdesfc 


1342 21PM 

17% 20 *1M 

SwiflTs 


236 26% 25% 

26 

—ft 

Trton 



1266 6% 



29(2 22% 21% 22* *% 

SwnoSld 


MI 11 

ID 

1UM 

— * 

Triples 



6133 16* 

Softkey wl 


(179 12M TIM 12 —ft 

Swtohwt 


537 % 

M 

% 


TriqiHd 



23(316% 

SltQc 


2807 15 

13ft 

15 ♦!* 

Swisher 


353 6* 

SM 

5% 

*W 

Trtsin 



37818% 

SttwPb 


0737 7M 

6% 

7M ♦ 1 

SvOstTc 


1025310* 

V 

10* 

*1 

Trfetar 



570 5 

SofTSoc 


886 17% 17 

17 —ft 



21484 51ft 48ft 50ft +1% 

TlUSNJS 

JBe 

J 

26214% 

Sdtwx 

e>e 

9742 12ft 

9 

UV* *2M 

5vbron 


242 34 

23% 23% 

«■% 

TVSINYS 

1X0 

sx 

44321ft 

SoiaSrv 


1(93 4 

3 

3% »ft 

SytvanFd 


80(10 

9* 

10 

— * 

Tntmk , 

XU 

2X 

68516% 



1554 1% 

IVk 

IVu — * 

SvtvnLm 


1454 17 

16 

16% 

♦ ft 


.15# 1X11166 10* 

Somn WTB 


102 V U 

ft. 

Vu — Vn 

Syrtv-Tek 


330 7% 

2Vk 

2% 





6910 5% 

SomHx 


1993 7% 

6% 

AM — * 



21682 16M 15% 16ft 

♦ % 

TUCkDr 



120 Sft 



2661 Bft 

7M 

Bft - 

Svmtx 


27 9 

8ft 

Sft 


TuesM 



363 6ft 

SomrGo 


154 13ft 

13ft 

13% »M 

Symotrlc 

— 

3979 9% 

8% 

9% 

+ % 

TlftCD 


Me 

67 8% 


SomstSi _ 383211ft, lft, IRS. —Vi, 

Eanesta 30*14 52 8 % • 8 % +% 

SorricCP _ 4829 23 Vi 22% 23 * % 

SanlcSol _ 205212% 11% 111* *% 

Sxiod’I 54 2J 436034ft 23ft 54% ♦% 
SooocP Pt 2J5 A3 499 53ft 53ft 53ft +% 

SoundA _ 350 6 W 5% 6 % *1 

SMChG Mb Al 192 20 19 19% * ft 

SostThr IJ9»5J 46619% 18V* 18% 

SaBee - 976 10 ft 10 % 10 % — % 

SthnEnH - - 6*7 18 16 17ft -lft 

SoVunri JS XI 21 lft lft 1ft —ft 

SJtmoSvs JOn 2 J 1233 17% 14 16% *T% 

Soutrsfs M X5 10601 19Vk 18% I9ft -ft 
Souwd _ 199 4% 4% 4Vk — 'fti 

SwstBcp JJ9e J K1213 lift lift —ft 

SwScsb 1J0CS.9 300 20 ft l*ft 20ft -ft 

SwsJNt 1J4 4 JO 41 33ft 30 31 —1 

SwstSCS .12 1 J 1506 9% Bft 9% -ft 

SwWdr .40 4.0 7710V* 9ft 10 -ft 

SovBCPS .10 1J 5999 10% 10% 10ft —ft 

SoaceU, - 5164 25 24 34% - ft 

SpanAm .10 1 J 566 Oft 4% Sft -ft 

SprtMtS tel J 3481 19% 17% 10 % — % 

SpeCMU - 748 Oft 6 6 

SpcDtf _ 3657 12 10 % 11% -ft 

SccEqp - 25B 7 6 % 7 

SpdPap _ 839 B% 8 8 % *% 

Spctnn - 1404 9 8% 8 ft —ft 

Spectra _ 934 2% 2% 2ft -% 

SpacOI - 256 4 3*k 3% — Vk 

SoocHol _ 1203 70% Sft 9 —1 

SpecTctl — 33613 3Yu 2ft 3 —ft 

Spd S p -10704 8 ft Oft 7>ik -ft 

S P C Ul i ei - 79314% 13% 13ft -ft 

SeMnxP _ 2577 5ft 5% 5% — W* 

SofeOBlS JO .9 5278 22 19ft 22 *2% 

Spire - 57 3ft 3ft 3% — % 

SCChari _ 67 4ft 4ft 4% 

Sortmrt - 788716ft 141* 15VS— 1ft 

SporiRec -17377 43ft M 42 ft +4% 

SplHero _ 133 lft. 1 1ft. —ft 

SptHrwf _ 40 % % % *% 

SportU. _ 4915 lft. ’ft. lft. +Vu 

SporisTn - 3291 3% 2% 3% 

Sprocket - 11210ft 10 10 —1* 

Saucrei - 43 5 4% 5 — % 

StoarSr* - 4634 6 % 5% 6 % -% 

StacElec _ 3193 4Vk 5% 5ft — % 

Stacey* - 3448 3% 3% MS, — Vk 

Stocv* wt - 1063 1 Wu —ft, 

StafBtd -12992 S 4% 4>ft. -ft 

StdMal _ 1785 8 7% 7% — % 

STdMlC - 892319V* 17% 18% -ft 

StdReo “ 


Seeanpf 

SecScp 

SecCaoBc 

SecEnvs 

SecFsts 


Seprecr 
SCbunt 
SfeOUOi 
Sereoen 
StvTsh 
9weFre» 
SvPnQuod 
SevEm 
SHamon 
StrMad 
ShtfTKtl 
Shrotm 
SbowGo 
SheJdl 

MM 

SMoil 

ShoeCars 

Mods* 

ShPmil 

9rtiPn 

snorwd 

Showbiz 

Sfiwscn 


SerSml 

SierToW 

SiarTuc 

5iomDc 

SismAl 

SJotyStI 

SgrtTecM 

SteneJGc 

SiontCpt 

Sficwvl 

SIlfcnVlB 

SOicnv I 

SMeino 

KmnFtl 

arnnoui" 

Sbnpinii 

SWcsn 

Skywgi 

SkvfiootH 

Smioa ■ 

stmoowtl 


SfdReo AB XO 1497 23% 21ft 22V* -Vk 

SforrfTl - 1703 21V* 30 21% - 

StardRiC _ 31415% 18% 14% 

STtxd M J 524 18 17% 17% *% 

Sloodyn _ 1600 27k 2ft 2Vu —ft. 

Stoodywt _ 157 PS, % W* *Vb 

Staples i _ 645831 30 30% ♦ V* 

Storfic IJO 19 291036% 35% 34% _ 

StarTc _ 2061 1 aft* % —ft 

Start*** -36330 25V* 31 23% -% 

StareWAu _ 007 10% 10 10 — % 

StarTK _ 2194 T2% lift lift —ft 

SatAUt* .18 1J 127 13ft 13 13*ft -ft 

StoteBin .109 A 68 17 16% 16ft ♦ % 

SJPnd JO 3J *30 13 12 12 - 

SteArt _ 4051 8% 7% Sft -ft 

StaSrtfcH JS6 1 J 13706 39 37% 38ft 4 1 

StotnCas _ 048131% 20 V. 20% 

SteckVn - 123 9% 9% 9ft - 

SteefTes At J 1509 31V* 20% 21% -ft 

SHWVa _ 911 13% lift 12ft -1 

SJemMTS - 3530 20 18% 1W- 1 

Stephn - 112 M 18% IBIS— 1 Hi 

StHb — 6247 26 ft 23% 26% +1% 

SlerBcs J3 1J 862 38ft 38, 3Mk -ft 

ariBnc JO 2A 638 17 15V* 16ft -% 

SJrlFnWA - 14313% 13 13% — % 

Strivva JOb 94 19 2ft 2 7ft 

SlwStv J4 J 9767 53% 49Y, 52 -2ft 

Slewai M J 151127 25% 26ft — % 

Stimsan - 87513% 11% l?% - 

SlokAtY - 1658 8% Bft 8% -ft 

StoHCBl* _ 967 13". 12% 13% -ft 

Sttit - 82322 21 37 -1 

Sfiu tcm -1118318% 15ft IBft -lft 

Strw«3 1.10b AS 357 23 22 22ft *ft, 

Sfrober - 373 49b 4% 4% -ft, 

StmeO _ 9623 I5ft 14% 1 5% -ft, 

Sirvker J7e j 8476 33% 31 32 —1% 

Stort&i - 983 6% 4% Sft -1 

SrurtOS - 682 Vu 'Vu ft 

SobMfcr - 2103 7ft 6ft 7ft _ 

Subto IjOO 2J 26 43 40V* 40ft - 

Sub&KP fist A 43312% HVk 11% -% 

Sudbury -14149 7ft 4ft 7ft -vs 

SuttBnc J8 19 4 23VS 21ft aft -2, 

SullDfit _ 757318% 18 18% —ft 

Sumta JO 3J 214721'* 20 21ft -lft 

sumiropt im aj 147 a% » 2«ft -ft 

Sum map - 169941 38ft 41 -lft 

Surras - 72 5>A 4% 5 -% 

Sutnopn - 749 7ft 6ft 7 -ft 

SUT16WA J7e S 77 8 7ft 7% — % 

SumW J4 Al 20620% 19ft SOW -% 
SumtSTX J6 11 217ft 17ft 17ft— lft 

SumtCre - 83224% »% 23ft -ft 

SurmTHtt J84 J 5848 9ft 9 W. -ft, 

SunUtTc —16*73 37% 32% 34% -% 

SunUnoP .92 30 331 31 31 

StftlMiC -11185031% 29% 30ft -lft 

SunSpT _ 39 6% 6% 6% 

Sun TV S M A 400(712 10 11% — % 

Sunbelt - 105 8% 8 8% -ft 

SunSav _ 255 6% 6% 6% 

SunSvpt 1J0 XI 77 14% 14% 14% -ft 
SundMne - 3412% 11% 11% —ft 

SunGrti - 18769% 39 39% — % 

Sunotoss — 7(529% 37V* 38ft -ft 

SunBCA .151 A6 43 3ft 3% 3% _ 

SunBcNY - 53316% 15% 14% +1 

SunLSB - 737 6 5% 5% -ft 

SunrTC - 3926 6% 5 6 -% 

SunMn wl - 7146 ft q*> ***, — ft, 

StfiwT* _ 3558 11 10 10% -ft 

- 261 12% 12 12% - % 

SupAAac - 775510% 10 10ft —ft 

SupTedv _ 1899 4% 6 6 - ft 

Suppeui - 3469 15ft 14% 15% * % 

Suprtei _ 199 3% 3% 3ft - 

SupSpd - 74021ft, 3% 2% -ft 

SgpWf - 47211 10 10% —hi 


SvnOptS -54857 26% 24ft 25 - 

Svnatov J6 1.9 89519% 17 19% -2% 

Synbio _ 6M 5ft 4% 4ft 

Svncor _ 182521% 19% 21% -ft 

Syttoti - 525 3% SVS 3% * % 

Svneron - 6060 12% 11% 12% -% 

Syndic - 56810ft 10% 10% - 

Synopsys -19436 46 39ft 45% -4% 

Synllct - 1416 3% 2% 2Wu — **, 

Syrtro _ 641 3 2% 2% —ft 

Sysisns .12 J 13634 18 16ft 17ft -*k 

Systmd - 327B 5% 4ft 5ft, -Vp 

Systemte _ 77 19% 18% 19% ♦ 1 

SVklCpt — 534823ft 21% 23ft -1% 


TATTCS - 4997 6% 4% 4% *% 

TAT Wl - 1245 1% % lft -Wh 

TBCs _. 274(13% 13% 13% — % 

TCA AS 1.9 6092 24ft 22% 22% — 1% 

TO Ini -. 294 4ft, 4% 4% _ 

T Coll - 3113 5ft 4% 4% * ft 

TFCEnt _ 904 13% 13 13ft - 

THQ _. 7753 1% Hi lft* -ft, 

TJ IntlS 32 J 1691727 23% 26% -lft 

TNT PIS J7 1.4 5008 28'* 26% 27 —1% 

TP1 En - SCO B 7ft 7% —ft 

TRFnc _ 3402 12% lift 12% *% 

TRAACPV _. 65511 10ft 10% — % 

TROLm _ 2568 9ft 7% 9 «% 

TSICp _ 9754 1ft, =Vd =Vb —ft, 

T5J Inc .16 1.2 77 13ft 12% 13 —ft 

TSR - 428 4V, 3% 4% *% 

TVXGW _ 4391 6% 6% 6ft -%» 

TocaCabS _ 1304a 19% 17 11% -1% 

TakeCr - 7354 76 74% 75% -1 

TandyBr - 16419 16% 19 -2% 

Tanlrtpy _. 82) 5% 4% 4% — % 

Taptstm - 5135 4 3 3 — % 

Taoist wt - 1119 % ft % — V» 

TotbcIT - 939 26 94 25* -lft 

TaroPti - 8S2 7% 6% 7% -4S 

Tattiom _ 1584 1 0* 9V, 10ft -ft 

TchDala _ 5674 42* 39% 41% -1% 

Tchnal J6 A8 40 12% 11 Vj 11% ♦% 

Techne _ 63511% 10V* 10% 

TcnCom _ 397 10ft 9* 9ft — 1 

Tecnscrt _ 176 7 6ft 6% _ 

T eends _ 477314% 13ft 14 •% 

Tecnmtx _ 91 9% 8V* 9ft -ft 

TecuBs JOolJ 1 1 IM 62 ft 57'i 59ft **6 

TeewAs JOa 1.6 1915 51% 50% 51ft -1% 


JO 1.1 19118 

JIB A 22479 20% 


Low ase Oiae 
5% 5ft 
10 ft 11 —V. 

9% TOft — Vk 
13ft 15ft —ft 
4% 4ft —ft 
5ft 6ft +ft 
13ft 15 - 

15% 16 

17% 17% - 

4% 5 +% 

14ft 14% +% 
19ft 20 —lft 
15 16ft -lft 

oft m +v* 

5 5ft -ft 
4ft 5ft 
5% 5% —ft 

8 0 

17 17ft —ft 
20 20ft — % 


viispm 

VA21 

VaPst 

ViroGp 

VUonSd 

VtSX 

vnatson 

vwnk 


OK Yld 100, HW, Law 
Ml — 60 Bft 8 

.16 2J 712 7ft 7 
Me A 4 14ft 14% 
_ 15 3ft 3% 

- 1267 8 7% 

- 7831 26% a : 

- 742 14 13 

- 167 13ft 12% 
_ 4809 5ft 5 

- 2107 IBM. 17 

- 136 17% 16 
1JM« 1 J 150 86 83ft I 

- 2891 5M 4ft 


8 % -ft 

7% - 

14ft _ 
3ft -ft 
7% —ft 
26ft *1 
14 -ft 
13 -ft 
Sft _ 
IBft -1% 
17ft -lft 
84 —lft 
5ft -ft 


UnBrtc ■ 

unank pt 

UnBkCP 

UnlonBsh 

UPimplE 

UnSwtdi 

unipnese 

UnrvTTcj 

t/BWV I 

UCarBIc 

UOtGs ■ 

UnCocFs 

UFlnSCs 

URreCs 

UGomoB 

UtdHnnJ 


£turt& 

SiurtDS 

SubMicr 

Subto IjOO IS 


SumbD JO 3J 2147 21 '* 20 
Sumiropt X03 8J 14724ft 24 
Sum maF - 169941 389 

Stmmos - 72 Sft 4W 

Sumopn - 749 7ft 6vs 


TeeCmn ._ 511 3 1 .* 3 3Vu — v„ 

Taketec - 120 7V« 6 6M — % 

TeknVjn _. 1448 7 1 * 6ft 6ft — Vk 

Teto) -1519613ft lift 12% -IVk 

Tdvid _ 3272 V., 'Vj: ft - 

TeiCmA -11811824% 71% 23ft -lft 

TelCmB _. 16 26% 24ft 36ft -1% 

Tctebil -28080 15% 12ft 14ft +2% 

Tefedro _ 386616% 13ft 15% -lft 

Tel I OS - 3665 S 4% 4ft —ft ; 

Tetabss _ 704959% 55ft 56% —ft 

TelrOsn - 251 4» 4% 4% —ft, 

TeHjIcr _ 4399 18% 16% 17ft —ft 

Tdxon JIT .1*6051 15% 14% IS —ft, 
Twntex _ 473913ft 11% 12ft +V.I 

Tencor _ 3369 17ft 15% 17% -lft 

Tennant 1.2B XO 13 44 <2% 42V* —ft 

Termtbc _. 31 3ft 3V* 3V, — «* 

TetrcTcs _ 860 20* 19% 19ft ♦% 

Tatra - 3407 7ft 6ft 7ft -% 

TevBS JO# J 14876 33 'J 29ft 30ft +% 

TexRcsl _ 5052 12ft 12 12 

ThfTsh - 2796 14% 12ft 14 -Vi 

Threen _ 2737 4ft 3% 4% -ft 

TTwrDul _ 1019 6% S' V« yVu — Vu 

ThomasG _ 1808 17*k 16% lift —V* 

ThmMBk J6 1J 4216 16 16 — 1% 

ThmMAt Jft U 417117% 15% 16% _ 

Thmsn 2.00 e 6.0 29335 33ft 34ft -1% 

ThmAV JS 1 J 245 23% 22ft 23% — ' % 

TTBoTr _ SC lft !9u 1% -Vu 

3Com -7824163ft 56ft 63 -Aft 

3D 5vs _ 2913 2 lft lft 

3DOCO _ 9133 27% 23% 25 -VS 

TWeWit _ 1837 12% 11% 12 ♦% 

TideWtrk - 75 P4 lft 2% +% 

Twere _ 375 ft Vi, 

Timbsi - 125 7% A% 6% 

TVtcmHH) JS 25 826 18ft 9ft 10 -ft 
TitonWhl me .1 3773 29% 27 29 

Tocortl 2S3 35% 32 35% - 

TodayM - 10294 15% 13% 14ft -1ft 

TaddAO Ot- 1J 1 3ft 3% 3ft -ft 

Yodhuntr - 476 uvi 13ft 14% -ft 

ToktoF J7e A 4363 61 6Zft -1% 

TefcOSMd 4733 4ft 4 4ft —ft 

Tmkrtcs SOe 3J 286 15% 15% 15ft -ft 
Tempkn 1JUt>2J 72(0 36 36 

Topes JS 19 9344 7ft 6ft 7ft -ft 
TopsArt _ 1740 10ft 9ft 9ft —ft 

Tor Roy _ 96 3'/. 3ft 3% 

TafCOM - 121610% 10 10% _ 

Tatrret _ 50 18 17% 17ft - u 

TowrAtr _ 1512 15 14% 14% — Vk 

Trocar wt - 97 7ft 6ft 7ft -ft 

Trocar _ 455 9ft 9 9ft - 

TrocSUP - 2405 24ft 22W 23% _ 

TrokAu - 26513% 13 13ft -ft 

TmsPm JS 3A 371 16 15ft 15% —ft 

TmLM _. 102 3% 3% 3% +% 

TmMus - 49713 12ft 12% -ft 

Trmln .. 13 1% lft 1% —ft 

TmsWst _ 863 3% 3Vu 3"*, _ 

TrWsiwlB _ 3311 Kb IVu Hft, *v„ 

Tmsmt - 98 4% 4ft 4ft —ft 


Tocortl 

TodayM 

TaddAO 

Todhuntr 

TokloF 

TeicosMd 


Topps 

TqpsAp! 

Tor Roy 

Totem 

Turret 

TowrAtr 

Traarwt 

Trocar 

TrocSup 

TrokAu 

Tfrefin 

TmLSO 

TmMus 

Trmln 

TmsWst 

TrWsiwtB 

Tmimt 


Tmmeds JOi .1 695094% 20% 23% -a 
TmftrCP _ 5541 21ft 20% 20% —ft 

Tflftrt _ 1941 2V* i 2% +7u 

TrmstkGS _ 747814% 14 14 

TrwlBc J6t A6 1215ft Uft 14%— 1 

TrovPrl _ 1038 3ft 2% 2ft — % 

Trento u .9 1B6 18ft 17% IBft - % 

Trrwck 1J0 X9 1310 34% 33% 34% •% 

TriOTB - 1996 3 2% 2% -ft 

TriOOGtY _ 2044 17ft 15% 17’* -1% 

- 312? y* 4% y* -v« 

- 107 >0% 9% 9% -ft 

IL? 1 ? - I" 7 15 14ft 14ft —ft 

TlkCepn -40b 2.1 105519 18% 10% —ft, 

TtoPd ljn Al 15(30% 17 19%—% 

Trimrtt _ 922 16ft 14% 16ft 1 1% 1 

Tricon! -2161017% 13ft 15ft— lft 


UMoBnH 
UnBcpNJ 
UtdNwsp 
UlRetoaH 
LTSvBk | 
U5BCOR 
US Bn pf 
US Cops! 
LJSEnr | 
us f«xj| 
ustoa 
us 

usi^H 

US Tre t 

UStntnB 

UnTeievl 

UtdVitied 

uwws)e| 

UWWlsJ 

Unttagd 

Ucltrtnl 

Unhrtwl 

UnwBcl 

UrtvTor] 

UrtvHIdl 

UnvHsp] 

Unwlnt 

UnvSefsl 

UnvStdMl 

UnvNH I 

UPenEs 

UrenRosJ 

UrtKKXIJ 

Uramedj 

USBPafl 

Ul*MdS 

Utflx 


V Band 
VLSI 
VMX 
V5BBCS 
VSE 
VWRS 
vcdTeai 
Vdien 
VWvBc* 
VdvSy 
VcflCor 
Vrimflt 
VtSAdCm 
Vat lji 
V otVteA 
VordO 
Vans 
Voritrn 
Varien* 

VarSprt 

VedrnTc 
VenenSW 
vantrtt, 
vencty 
Verttum 
Vorthc 
Verifns 
Vert) os 
VlRn 
Versa 
Vedw 
vertexC 
vertxPh 
Veto Am 
VetAmwt 
Viaoane 
Vied 
VrCOT 
Vtorp 
Vfcffln 
vwaFns 
VMD6P 
VUeaL 

lAedePr 

VwwtB 

VOting 


- 139617ft 16ft 17ft -ft 

JO XO 223 2SV* 24* 25 — % 

J0aX4xJI36 6 5% 5% +ft 

_ 33 4% 4% 4% —ft 

1JM 33 430% 99 30% -IV* 

- 1281 S% 4% 4% — % 

- 54 49k 4% 4% — % 
-1669612ft 10ft 12ft - IM 

- 197 5ft 4% 5 —ft 

_ 797 5ft 39k 4% -ft 

_ 1156 9ft 8% Sft -ft 
_ 262 17ft 16ft 16% — % 

- 569 4ft 4%. «*, —Pa 

- 1109 72ft 12 12ft -ft 

_ 652 6 Sft Sft — Vk 

- 913 Sft 6ft 6ft — % 

-216013 17 12% -lft 

_ HOB JDV* 2 8ft 3D +3 

U70 1.1 S25 CM 59k 6ft -ft 
_ 176 5ft 5V* Sft - 

.13 IJ 229 9% Bft 9 +%, 

- 2501 3V,. 2ft 29b —ft I 

_ 6809 6 Sft Sft —ft 

- 28193>Vu TV. 3* —ft 

1.40 52 41D27 26ft 26% —ft 

2J>9 8 A 36T25V4 25 25 —ft 

- 11 28 28 28 +3 

1J0O1X9 45 8% 7% 7% — % 

2J» 5J 331 35ft 34% 34% —ft 

- 686 22 21ft 21% - 

- 062 10% 10 18 — % 

- 3200 Sft 5ft 5% -Vu 

1JM 33 8026% 25% 26% -ft 

JO 3J 493 22% 22ft 22% -Vk 
1JO 55 444 17% 17* lTVk —ft 

JO 3 355245V, 40% 45ft +4ft 
32 IJ 77 22ft 21ft 21V* — % 
1X8 XO 2239 36% 36V,— 2 

- 1948 0% 8V* 1% —ft 

_ 19 4ft 4ft 4ft - 

_ 64 27ft 26ft 27ft -ft 

_ 239736* 35 35% —I* 

JO 23 21 B 36ft 3SV* 36ft -% 

lJDb XI 12 32% 30% 32% -2 

1.120 X4 1920% 20% 20% - 

- 108512* 12 12% -1 

JO X5 32220% 19% 20ft - 

J8 1433637 26% 25 26 -% 

2jn 8J> 276 25% 2Sft 25ft —ft 

_ 190 BM 69k OM -lft 

_ 45S 5 4% 5 -M 

- 1470 9ft 8% 9 —ft 

JO 1326192 67% 65ft 67% —2 

- 60 5% 5ft 5% - 

-11829 44% 39% 41 —2% 

2X0 19 1525 51% 49% 51% +1M 

AO 2 A 229415% 13% iyA -1% 

_ 187 43% 42ft 43% -IM 

_ 113314 13ft 14 - 

- 369818% 17% 18 — % 

AO 1 A 31535% 31% 33ft— 1% 

-10e A 482 25% 23M 25% -IM 

1X0 14 2857 40% 40% 40% -% 

_ 4701 9% 7ft 9% *2 

- 3871 9% 8ft 8% —ft 
JDe A SOI 9% Bft Bft —lft 

_ 237 3M 3ft 3ft - 

_ 2320 4% Sft » — % 

- 463 2ft 2 9ft - ft 

- 1064 4 3% 3% -#■» 

- 40 9 8% 9 _ 

1X0 A4 61 33 32 32 — 1 

1.17 47 8419 17% 17% —ft 

- 331 4 3ft 3ft -ft. 

- 907 27ft 25 27ft +2% 

- 7587 8% 7ft 8 - 

JB X6 m 24% 23ft 44% -ft 

- 426 7ft 7% 7ft -M 
_ 1287 6ft 59k 5Vu— ft. 


WCTCin - 3295 6 4ft 6 -M 

WD« 2JX) a AS 43444 43 43ft —ft 

W1_H Fd J2 1X 372533 30% JIM -ft 

WPIGrp _ 134 3% 3M 3% 

WPPGp JSell.l 6114 3ft 3ft Wu —ft, 

WRTEn _ 954 11 10* 10* — Vk 

WRT Pf Z25 8X xl(3 27 26 36ft _ 

WSFS _ 274 4* 3* 4* +ft 

WSMP _ 10 5* 5* 5* - 




to* 10* — M 
125 8 X xlS3 27 26 36ft- 

_ 274 4Vk 3M 4M + ft 

- — 12 5% SS' ** 

- 208 Jft Sft 3% - 

- 13(16 14% 15% -M 

- 1677 3M IM 3M -ft 

WaBtro X0 IJ 10(730 29ft 30 -V* 

Wfdklnr -1184313ft 9ft 12% +2% 

WdTDctfa _ 6225 60 53% 59% -5% 

WonSDC - 110 13% 12ft 12ft —ft 

Wolshr J4 2JJ 2106 lift 10* lift +1 
W®bU 6 -18205 19 15ft IBft -2ft 

WanoLwt _ 261 9ft Bft 9% -ft 

Wormc _ 2964 5V„ -V. 5Vu — V» 

Warren _ 1676 8* 79k 8% -ft 

WshBcp - 39613% 12ft 12ft —ft 

WFSL X8b A0 635022* 21ft 22Vk -% 
WshRX: t _ 1063 3* 3% 3% - 

VMMSBs A4 23 10282 22* 31% 22* -ft 
WMSBpfCUB 8J 262 27 26% 2SM _ 

WMSBpIDAOO 5 A 230106*105 106% —M 

z 

Watttsvr - 25 6* 6ft 6% -Vk 

Wafrln - 3 2% 2% 2% 

WatsnPti -10700 18ft 16 17 — % 

WbtfsJns J2 J 139129 27 27%— lft 

WouSPS J4 J 3870 35 30ft 34 -2% 

waver X4 X3 431 19% 17 19 ♦? 

Webcolnd _ 410 17% 16% 16M _ 

WteJFn J2b2J 1307 20% 19ft 20% +% 

Wedco 1.10I1IX 1011 10 10 —ft 

Writek - 4483 8% BM BM —ft 

WMbiV _ 1294 IBft 17ft 18% _ 

WelMot _ 137826 25% 2SM -ft 

WfeOms -25993 87% 81ft 85% -3% 

Wafetds _ 260 Sft 6 6ft -ft 

Werner s .12 X 2499 31% 29* 31% -1% 

Wesbncs 44 Lt 28 28% 27% 28% -ft 

WOCltCA _ 254 * 1*, v, -Vk 

WstCstn. JO IX 3912ft 12 12% -Vk 

WstMor - 1636 21% 19ft 21ft +1% 

WMtare Jt 1 J 39 16% 15% 16 

WNewtfi XO 1 J 234523* 2T% 229k — 

WstOnea jn 2 X 5457 28% 27% 27* -M 

WcMcdB ,13e J xll3 18 17% 17ft -ft 

WUcor* _ 4388 23% 21% 23ft -lft 

Westerfed _ 751 13ft 12% 13 —ft 

WtBenks X0r2j 45017ft 15% 17ft -1% 
wsffieel _ 4* 9* 8% oft —ft 

WFOPW JO# 7.9 31 28 27% 27% —ft 

WMieTc - 993 9 Bft 8% -ft 

WDnPt, -1B668 17M 13% 16% +19b 

WStWBtr - 10651 30% 23% 25% -2 

Water, - 427 Bft 7 8 -% 

WstSys - 1781 19 18% 18% —ft 

WsteBc - 107 3 2% 2* —Vi, 

WitwOn -13797 10ft 9% ID* -’Vu 

Wet5ed _ 837 4% 3% 4 —ft 

WetrPr lJ4a6J 56 21ft 21% 21% _ 

Woyco XO 2J 3 35% 32% 35% - 1% 

Whorl ,10e _ 48 9ft 0% 9ft -ft 

Whratty JJ4 X 442811% 10% 11 -% 

WhBeRvr _ B97 32 30% 31 -% 

WhBHkl* XO 2X 090 22* 21% 21% *- 

Whfd, _ 7387 20% 18 20% -2 

Whfrttys -12250 25ft 22% Zdft -1H 

WicfcLu — 3928 23 30%22%-IU 

YmyJA 1.10 IJ 196 92 83% 92 -7 

WBfamtk .96 IJ 8915 54% 51% 9U— lft 

wntml - 200 2% 2% ?% -ft 

WmSons -11259 34ft 31% 34>A +1% 

WitmTr 1 1X0 AO 2(9425% 23ft 24ft -ft 


Wlnrfthrr — 2373 7 6% 6% —ft 

WinstFu _ 12310% 9% 9% — % 

WWhpRs XO 3 671 12% 11% 12 -ft 

WfccCT _ 69675% 73% 75% +1% 

Wstohn JO 1 3 15316% 15% 16% -Vk 

WMdwr* „ 36*720% 16% 19% -IM 

VAxmSkJ J4 IX 633 IBM 16ft 18 -% 

WrkOop J6 ZJ 4625% 25% 25% _ 

WlOto _ 366118% 18 18% t% 

WortF* .12 IJ 1073 9% 9 9% -ft 
Wnrtho* J6 1X1046220% 19ft 19M -M 
Wyman - 2707 6ft Sft 6% — % 


- 510 5% 
-19171 16ft 

jb a "ML 

JO 15 III 
XO X6 26911% 

- 10188 17ft 

- 9215 
36 2.7 38735% 

_ 1131 2% 
J2 2J 227313ft 
JO IJ 44717 

- 876 5% 
.80 XI 7738% 

-11836 9ft 

- 4684 30ft 
402 5ft 

_ 623 10ft 
XO U 20026% 
_ 122 16% 

- 057 9% 

- 493 10% 
-4(392 27% 

- 575 2ft 
JS AO 2 7 

- 1857 3ft 

- 72361* 

_ 476 22% 

AO X3 347 17% 
J20 2J 318 14% 

- 2735 7ft 

- 168615% 

- 321216% 
_ 4392 9 

- 4343 2% 
_ 1159 9% 

- 229614ft 

- 7691 30ft 

- 422318ft 
J2 XI 308 24% 

_ 329 1% 
_ 36 3% 

_ 483320% 

- 302 SM 

- 692529% 
_ 3042 52 


5ft 5M —« 
15% 15ft -ft 
5 59k -ft,! 

20 ft 21% -ft 
12 12 —lft I 

10% lift -ft 1 
15ft 16 - 

14 W —Vi 
3Sft 3Sft -ft 
2 2% -ft 

12% 13 -ft 
16 17 - 

4ft 5Vh ♦% 
36 38% -2 

8% 9% *% 
38% 2Bft— 1 
5ft 5% —ft 
9% 10ft _ 
35ft Sft— lft 
15% 15% - 

9 9ft —ft 
9M 10ft —ft 
21% 26ft -lft 

2 2ft -ft 

7 7 -ft 

7M 3% -Vk 
18ft 18% +H 
31 31 — % 

16% 17ft -ft 
13ft 14ft -ft 
SM 6% —ft 
13% 15 -ft 
15ft 15% — H 

8 8% -ft 

lft 2M -Vu 
Bft Bft —ft 
13ft 13ft -ft 
27% 30 -2ft 
16% 17ft —ft 
23ft 24% _ 

7ft 8% 4% 

3 3 —ft 

18% Sft -1% 
4% 4ft —ft 
3AM 39ft *1 
48* 51% i 3ft 


- 2691 4ft 4ft 4% - 

J 1174 34ft 22ft 23 —1 
-1M66 3VU 2ft 2% —ft 

- 4318 56% 53% 56% -2 

- 16834 27ft 24% 27 -3 

- 1*1117% 16 ft 16M — M 

- 53 1ft 1% 1% —ft 
_ 1943 19% 18 T9ft -lft 

- 114519 18 18 —ft 


YetfawCp 3 4 
Y«atn 
YarfcFn X0 
YarfcRs 
Younker 


ZSewn 

ZdeCp 

ZOMCbwi 

zama 

Zebra 

ZOnLabt 

Z EO S 

S 2 

zmo 

ZfanBcp 1.12 

Ztid 

zeHM 

zonk 

ZoamTl 

Zyaad 

Zvoo 

Z maxis 

Zvtee 


3X1474530 26 26ft— 4 

- 252 1% 1% lft _ 
2J 301 22% 21 21ft -ft 

_ 2774 5M 5% SM -ft 

- 179* 20% 19% 20% -ft 


- 7218ft 

- 7983 9 

- 902%, 

_ 3914ft 

_ 382556 

- 618918% 

- 3441 3% 

- 8(3137% 

- 15 2 
2J 110139ft 

-.912 3 

- 276236ft 

- 502 8U 

- 87813 
-15341 3% 

- 140 8 

- 1326 3% 

- 53010* 


17 17ft— 1 

■% 9 -ft 
2% 2% —ft 
-* 

50ft 50% -ft 
17% 17ft— 1 
3 3H 
»ft 36 -2% 

» »% +M 

3«* Sft-^tS 

K% 12ft 1% 

W!“ ;s 

3 3ft 
9% 9% —ft 





r 


Page 14? 


O N 


A Y 


SPORTS 


Schneider Tacks On Slalom Victory 

She Wins 3 Medals at Finals on Way to Overall Tide 


The Associated Pros 
VAIL, Colorado — Vreni 
Schneider of Switzerland collected 
her third medal of the World Cup 
Finals, winning the women's sla- 
lom by a huge margin on Sunday, 
while the men's slalom was can- 
celed because of deteriorating 
course conditions. 

. It was the 30th World Cup sla- 
lom victory of Schneider’s career. 
Paired with her 20 giant-slalom tri- 
umphs and one combined victory, 
she raised her victory total to 51 — 
second only to the 62 of Austria’s 
Anne- Marie Moset-ProO, 

The cancellation gave the men’s 
slalom title to Alberto Tomba of 
Italy, who came into the final event 
with a substantial lead in the stand- 
ings over Thomas Stangassinger of 
Austria. Tomba led Stangassinger 
by 88 points (540-452J and could 
have finished as low as 15th and 
still won the title, even if Stangas- 
singer had won the race. 

Tomba, who gained the sixth 
World Cup title of his career. 


with the decision to cancel, 
snow was way too soft,” he 

said. 

Asked if he felt he had backed 
into the title, he said, “Remember, 
I was in front by 88 points.” 

“I would like to have raced be- 
cause I didn’t ski well in the giant 
slalom," he said, referring to the 
race Saturday in which he finished 
14th. “But I won four slaloms and 
was sometimes second or third in 
the giant slalom, so it was a good 
season for me." 

Stangassinger, the Olympic gold 
medalist in slalom, said he, too, 
favored the jury’s decision. 

“When we were inspecting the 
course, I think every racer was 
thinkin g the snow was too soft and 
it might be dangerous," he said. 

Schneider, who earlier in the fin- 
als placed third in the downhill and 
second in the giant slalom, was un- 
touchable in the slalom — the event 
in which she won a gold medal in 
the Olympics last month. 

With a blistering first run of 


SCOREBOARD 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic EH vlsM 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

New York 

45 If 

703 

— 

Orlando 

39 25 

509 

6 

Miami 

37 27 

578 

8 

New Jersey 

33 31 

-516 

12 

Boston 

22 41 

549 

22W 

Philadelphia 

21 43 

J2B 

24 

Washington 

19 45 

Control Division 

797 

26 

Atlanta 

44 19 

598 

— 

Chicago 

42 22 

556 

2VS 

Cleveland 

36 29 

554 

9 

indtona 

24 29 

540 

10 

Charlotte 

28 34 

M2 

T5W 

Detroll 

18 47 

777 

27 

Milwaukee 

17 46 

770 

27 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest DWlston 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

x-Kouston 

45 17 

.726 

— 

x-San An unto 

46 19 

708 

w 

Utah 

43 23 

552 

4 

Denver 

31 32 

492 

14to 

Mlnnesola 

18 46 

781 

28 

Dallas 

1 57 

Pacific DhrMaa 

.123 

38to 

x -Seattle 

46 17 

730 

— 

Phoenix 

42 22 

556 

4to 

Portland 

39 26 

500 

■ 

Golden State 

37 27 

578 

9to 

LA. Lakers 

25 37 

403 

20to 

l_A. Clippers 

23 39 

771 

22M 

Sacramento 

23 42 

754 

24 

x -clinched pkrvaH spat 



FRIDAY'S RESULTS 



Minnesota 29 20 21 20-100 

ptmmdPiiia n 25 n n- n 

M: Kino S-19 4*20, Person 7-14 M18. Rider 
5-U M It P: Wealfwrapooct 9-19 *7 22. J. 
Mo tone 9-17 4-4 22. Rebound*— Minnesota S3 
(Kina 161. PhltodelpHro*4 (WB uta er w oo u 111. 
AntsU— Minnesota 29 (Williams 7), PMtadet- 
Phto 23 (Dawkins 8). 

demand 22 22 as 27— M 

Orlande 27 25 28 33-113 

C: Williams 10-19 1-1 21, Price 5*18 M 19.0: 
seen IT-16 04 28, O'Neal 16-21 6-» 38. Re- 
bounds— Cleveland 56 (Hill. Williams 10). Or- 
lando 50 (O'Neal 15). Aeslste-Ctovetond 27 
(Brandon 7>, Orlando 31 (Harttanoy W>. 
UTab 23 17 19 19— 71 

Charlotte B 36 36 23— 82 

U: Malone 7-177-1021, Hamocok 6-14 44 18. 
C: Mourn I ns 6-12 9-11 21, Hawkins 6-12 54 18. 
R ebound s Utah 49 (Malone 13], Charlotte 59 
(Mcumlno 111. Assists— Utah 2D (Stockton 
11), Charlotte 17 (Booties 7). 

Atlanta 20 11 22 16-81 

IndtabO 17 M 28 17—78 

A: Manntafl 7-19 2-3 16. Willis 9-18 1-2 19. 1: 
Srnlts 5-153-4 13, Miller 6-13 1-3 16. Raheends- 
AttantaSS (Willis 16), Indiana 50 ID. Davis 12). 
Assists— Atlanta 25 (Blaylock 12), Indiana 24 
(Richardson 6). 

Seattle 28 20 31 20— *4 

Chicago 21 26 » 15-87 

S: Olll 7-14 04 2X Payton 6-15 3-4 15. C: 

Plaoen 9-24 4-7 22, Myers 7-11 l-l 15. Re- 
hoonde— Seattle 41 (Kemp 9), Chicago 49 
(Plpuen 15). Asstals— Seottte 25 (Payton .6), 
CMeaao 2* l Armstrong 61. 


Sacramento 38 32 26 27— 115 

Denver 17 30 22 34—1*3 

5: Richmond 9-150429. Webb 6- 15 64 11 D: 
Ellis 5-13 7-817, Pock 7-11 9-13 24. Rebounds— 
Sacramento 53 (Polynlce 10), Denver 55 (B. 
Williams 17). Assists— Socramcnto 23 (Webb 
II), Denver 15 (Pack 61. 

Detroll 27 29 26 32—114 

Phoenix 30 22 27 24—113 

D: Milts 12-19 1-2 27, Dufflan 11-184-8 30. P: 
Berkley 9-18 13-16 31, K. Johnson 7-16 64 20. 
Rebounds— Detroit 42 (Anderson 9), Phoenix 
55 (Barkley 121. Assists— Detroit 26 (Thomas 
13). Phoenix 29 IK. Johnson 11). 

New Jersey 25 28 32 27— 102 

LA. Lakers 22 22 31 25— to 

NJ.: Coleman 10-17 5-5 3S, Anderson 7-13 6-4 
21. 1_A.: Dfvac8-19 1-2 It Threatt 6-15 04 It 
Smith 6-11 0-1 12. Rebaaads— New Jersey 54 
{Coleman 18). Los Anodes 59 (Dtvoc IT). As- 
sists— New Jersey 25 (Anderson 11). Los An- 
eetos 27 (van Exoi 10). 

Washington » 38 19 26-184 

Portland 27 3* 38 27-123 

W: Gupnotta 1524 50 32, MacLean 9-15 >4 
21, Chapman W-zi 2-224. P: Strickland 512 10- 
12 2t D rex tor 1517 8-8 28. Rafxmnds-Wasfi- 
lneton 47 I Duckworth 10), Portland 52 (Bry- 
ant 7). Assists— Washington 31 (Price 10), 
Portland 25 (Draxier 8). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Boston 32 21 26 12- 91 

New York 33 23 34 25-1*5 

B: Radio 5-13 2-2 12, Parish 6-1050 12. Dous- 
tas 8-1 24-4 26 N.Y. : Ewing 9- 161 7-23 3& Harper 
7-9 1-2 17. Rebounds— Boston 37 (Radio 8), 
New York 56 lEwtno 14). Assists— Boston 19 
[Douglas 10), New York 22 (Anthony 5). 
Cleveland 21 15 29 28- 95 

Miami ZS 21 32 28—1*4 

C: Williams 7-16 5-7 19, Brandon 51648 22. 
M: Lana 512 54 20, Rice 1517 52 33. Re- 
bounds— Cleveland 36 (Williams 6), Miami 48 
( Seiko ly 9). Assists — Cleveland 20 (Williams 
7). Miami 26 (Shaw 15). 

Utah 14 22 21 36-103 

India no 34 21 30 2S-107 

U : Mciane 12-17 1518 37. Stockton 7-11 54 19. 
I: Smlts 5H 512 19. Miller 69 4-6 17. Re- 
boonds— Utah 38 (Malone 8). Indiana 59 (D. 
Davfs 16). Assists— Utah 29 (Stockton 11), In- 
diana 28 (Workman 7). 

OaMen State 3* 2B 32 26-116 

Dallas 24 B 25 28-187 

G: Mullln 516 50 30. Owens 516 4-4 20, 
Sprewoll 7-16 1511 24. D: Jackson 15245831, 
Leo tor 7-1 J 4-4 20. RsboendB— Golden Slate 9? 
(Gaffing 15), Dallas eo (Williams ID). As- 
sists— Golden State 23 (Mullln 0). Dallas 28 
(Jackson 10). 

Detroit 28 25 23 15- 80 

Haeston 27 25 B 22— 704 

D: Milts 5-164-415, Diunars517Q-0 20, Hunt- 
er 7-18 0-0 15. H: Otoluwon 15275732. Elto M 
51 21. Rebounds— Detroit 51 (Janes 10). Hous- 
ton SB (Elto 15). Assists— Detroit 15 (Thomas 
7). Houston 24 (Smllh 5). 

Sac ram ento 23 25 33 17— 110 

San Antonia 31 26 34 26— M7 

S: Tisdale 515 04 18. Richmond 5175627, 
Webb 6-12 6-6 18. S: E Ills 7-18 2-2 18. Robinson 
17-31 14-16 48. Rebound s— Sacramento 38 <Po- 
lynlce 9), San Antonio 55 (Robinson W). As- 
lists— Sacramento 23 Webb 11). San Antonie 
» (Del Negro 8). 

New Jersey 23 16 32 22- 93 

Phoenix 27 27 29 22— 10s 

NJ.: GUtman 6-12 1-5 15, Edwards MO 5-6 
IS, Newman 5-98-13 16, p: Malerie 7-185622. 


45.56 seconds, she built a sizable 
lead of 1 27 seconds over Marianne 
Kjoerstad of Norway, the runner- 
up, who was timed in 46.83. 

Because erf the tenuous course 
conditions, gates were not reset f or 
the second run, and the competitors 
skied the same course a second time. 

Schneider had another fast run 
in the second heat (50.35) and had 
a combined time of 1:35.91, which 
was 151 seconds ahead of runner- 
up Katja Korea of Slovenia, who 
had stood fourth after the initial 
beat 

Germany’s Martina Erti, winner 
of the giant slalom on Saturday, 
rallied from 14th position after the 
first heal to finish third in 1:37.54. 

Officials were unable to properly 
prepare the men's slalom course, 
which is on a steeper hill than the 
nearby women's track. 

“We came to the consensus that 
the snow' would break up, that it 
might be dangerous," said chief of 
race Jim Roberts. 


Green 515 2-3 IS. Rebounds— New Jersey 57 
(Colemon 9), Phoenix 56 (Bark lev 15). As- 
sists— New Jersey 28 (Anderson 12), Phoenix 
31 IK. Johnson 111. 

NCAA Tournament 

EAST REGIONAL 
First Raima 

North Carolina 71, Liberty 51 
Boston College 67, Washington state 64 
Temple 61, Drexel 39 
Indiana 84. Ohio University 72 


On Saturday, Schneider won the 
overall World Cup by finishing sec- 
ond in the giant slalom. Austria's 
Anita Wacfater claimed the giant- 
slalom title for the season, while 
her teammate Christian Mayer 
held off fast-closing KjetiJ Andre 
Aamodt of Norway to take the 
men's giant-slalom crown. 

Aamodt rallied from 13th place 
after the first run to win the race, 
while Mayer came from fourth to 
finish second. Aamodt scored 100 
points to Mayer’s 80, but Mayo- 
had entered the race with a 22- 
point lead. 

Aamodt, the men's overall cham- 
pion, had a brilliant second run 
after a first heat that left him 1.14 
seconds behind first-run leader 
Fredrik Nyberg of Sweden. 

Aamodrs second run of 1 min- 
ute, 10.53 seconds — nearly a full 
second faster than any other com- 
petitor — gave him a combined 
time of 2:25.62 that withstood the 
effort? of 12 subsequent skiers who 
had faster first-heat times. 


Vancouver 

35 

33 

3 

73 343 233 

Sot Jose 

25 

33 

13 

63 198 227 

Anaheim 

27 

40 

5 

59 198 221 

Las Ansoteo 

24 

37 

10 

58 252 272 

Edmonton 

19 

41 

12 

50 223 266 

x -clinched playoff spat 






Connecticut 75, George Washington 63 
Florida 70, Pormsvtvonto SB 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL 
Pint Round 

Marauatte 81, Southwestern Louisiana SI 
Kentucky 8X Tennessee State 70 
Duke 82, Texas Southern 70 
Michigan State 84. Setan Hall 73 
Second Round 
Purdue 83. Alabama 73 
Kansas 69. Wake Forest 58 

MIDWEST REGIONAL 
First Round 

Oklahoma State 65. New Mexico State 55 
Tulsa 112. UCLA 102 
Georgetown 84. 1 1 (Inals 77 
Arkansas 94. North Carolina A4T 79 
Second Reread 

Maryland 95, Massachusetts 87 
Michigan 84. Texas 79 

WEST REGIONAL 
First Round 
Virginia 57, New Mexico 54 
Arizona 81, LOVCla. MU 55 
Louisville 67, Boise Slate 58 
Minnesota 74. Southern Illinois 60 
Second Round 

Syracuse 64, Wisconsin-Green Bay 91 
Missouri 109. Wisconsin 96 



EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 

W L T Pts OF GA 
N.Y. Rangers 44 22 6 *4 256 200 

New Jersey 41 21 10 92 265 192 

W as h i ng to n 32 31 8 72 228 223 

Ftorido 30 29 11 71 195 194 

N.Y. Islanders » 32 9 69 244 229 

Philadelphia 31 33 7 69 253 267 

Tomaa Bay 25 37 10 60 194 221 

northeast Division 

Montreal 38 22 12 88 351 204 

Pittsburgh 37 23 12 86 263 250 

Boston 36 34 12 14 246 211 

Buffalo 36 27 9 81 238 191 

Quebec 29 35 7 65 232 239 

Hartford 24 41 8 56 196 244 

Ottawa 11 53 I 30 168 339 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Central Division 

W L T PH GF GA 
x- Toronto 39 22 11 89 238 203 

x-Oetrott 41 25 5 87 305 239 

Deltas 36 25 10 82 242 221 

CMcooo 35 29 8 78 220 199 

St. Louis 33 38 9 75 221 236 

Winnipeg 21 44 8 SO 218 297 

pacific DivisMn 

Calgary 35 27 11 81 299 22B 


FRIDAYS RESULTS 

CWCDSO 2 2 1-7 

N.Y. Rangers 1 1 1— 3 

First Period: 1. Chloso, Roenick 46tsh)C- 
C hellos 14 { Roenick. Matfeau I; N.Y.-Kovatov 
15 (Gllbart. Leeicti). Second Period; c-Mur- 
phy 26 IMattoou. Carney); N.Y. -Graves 49 
( Kovalev) ;C-Cunneywortfi 10 (B. Sutler, Car- 
ney). Third Period: C- Roenick 41 (Matteau) ; 
C-Comev 2 (Dubinsky,5hantz); C-Murefry Z7 
(Roenick): |pp). 1N.Y.-A monte Ik Shots an 
goal: C (on Richter) 10-10-11-33. N.Y. (on 
Bel four) 7-9-16-32. 

Edmonton I 0 3 *— 4 

Ftorido 7 2 16-4 

First Period: t-Grleve » ( Sta pleto n , doer); 
F-Skrudtand 12 (Hull. Hough). Second Period: 
F-Llndsay5(Qrella,5krudtand); F- Bernes 17 
(Kudetskt, Benninol; (pp). Third Ported: E- 
Mollby 12 (Arnett, McAmmond) ; E-Arrw1t,77 
(Kravchuk. Malta y) ; E -Grieve 9 (Richardson. 
Claer); F-KutfebW 40 (Lowry, Barnes). Shots 
on goal: E (on VcriblesbroudU 6-11-19 2—38. F 
(on Brnftnvalte) 11-13-9-0—31 
St. LoBll 2 0 6—2 

Toronto 2 11—4 

First Period: T-Clark 38 (Eastwood. Pear- 
son): SL-Nedved 2 (Shanahan. Crossrmxil; 
SL-Hull 47 (Bazoo, Stasfnv); T-Osborne 7 
(Rouse, Zezel). Second Period: T-Bere- 
howsky 2 (Mocoun. Anderson): (pa). Third 
Ported: T-Rouse 4 (Clark. Mocoun); (pp). 
Shots an goal: SJ_ (on Potvln) 13-7-14—34. T 
(an Joseph) I7M-26 
Buffato II* B— 4 

MY. Islanders «11 6—2 

First Period: B-Smehllk 13 (Muni); (sh>. 
Second Period: N.Y.-Green 18 (Datoorn* 
Kina); B-Wood 18. Third Period: N.Y.-Ferro- 
ra 17 (Kurvers, Hoauo) ; (pp). Shots 00 goal: B 
(an. McLennan! 12-15-7-0-35. N.Y.(an Hasek) 
74-16-160-14. 

Wasbhiatoa - M - 6- 73-8 

Dallas 2 2 3 6 

Pint Period: W-Khristtch 27 (Bandre, 
Hunter): no. Hatcher 11 (Cavolllnl. N. Bre- 
ton); (sh)D-Dahlen 19 (Mdtvldiuk, Lc- 

dvard); (pp). Second Period: D-Modano 41 
ICavalllnL Ktatt): D- Ludwig 1 (Madana 
Mooo); (pp). Third Period: o-Kiatr 11 (Mo- 
ttonc. Dahlen); W-lafrafe ID (Cotoy Bur- 
ridge); (pa). D-Modano 42 (Ktetr, Courtnall- 
) .Shots oe goal: W (on Moog) U-2D-1J— 47. D 
(on Beauore, Dafoe) 4-16-13—33. 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
New Jersey 3 3 1-d 

Boston 1 * 1-6 

First Parted: N J.-Guerln 19 (Doneyka Ho- 
Ilk): B-Murray 13 (Huohcs, Juneaul; NJ.- 
Richer 30 (NfchoOs, Nledermayar); Njrito- 
klk6 Second ported: B-Donoto JO (Show) ; B- 
Morots 3 (SmodnskL Heinz! NJ.-MocLemi 
33 (Nichofts) ; NJ.-MocLean34 (Letntewc, HI- 
chaiis): (pp). n J.-N1rtwlls 16 (MocLean, Ste- 
vens); 1B-Oote* 28 (Donota Sweeney); 1B- 
Bourquel9 (penalty shot). Third Period: 1B- 
Bourque 20 (Oates); (pp). INJ.-RIcher 31 
(C ar penter, Stevens); INJ.-Nlcholls 17 
(Chorske,Lomleiiz>;<wi). Shanea goal: NJ. 
(an Rlendeou. Casey) 16-7-6— 23. B (on Tor- 
nri, Bredeur) 13-169—36. 

Horttont 1 1 2-8 

Philadelphia 0 3 *-3 


First Period; H-Ptopp 14 (PetreWOry, 
McGill); H-Kron 20 (Verbeek. McCrlmmon). 
Second ported: 3. Philadelphia. Undras 9) 
( Zettler. Renberg), : 17. H-Lemleux 13 f Drury. 
Verbeek); P-Recchi 37 (Fed*. Otneen); p- 
BrincTAmour 23 [Renberg, Galley); (pp). 
Third Period: 7, Hartford, LemfeuxW (Drury. 
Verbeek), 19: l3.H-Proppl2(KroR,Prenger); 
len-pp). Shots oa seal: H (on Roussel, Sodar- 
Strum) 6-5-16-21. P (on Burke) 6-13-7-26. 
Vancouver 1 1 3—4 

Pittsburgh 3 ■ 1-6 

First Period: V-Bure 47 (OdIICk, Craven); 
P-Sandstrom 20 1 Jaorv Strata); P-De Palma 1 
ID. Brown. McEachern); P-Slevens 36 (Mur- 
phy, Mullen). Second Period: V-Bure 40 
ILumme, Linden) ; (pp). Third Period: V- Run- 
ning 22 { Linden. Momessa) ; P-strokaX ijagr. 
SaidHram ); P-McEochern 13 (Sandstrem); 
V-Slegr 4 (Craven). Shota oa goal: V ion Bar- 
rosso) 16-12-10 — 33. p (on McLean) 11-159-34. 
Son Jose ■ 1 0—1 

Los Angeles 2 6 6—2 

First Period: I_A.-Kurrl30 (Gretzky); LA.- 
McSarlev 6 (Gretzky. Drucel. Second Period: 
SJ.-Foltoon 20 (Pederson, Rathie). Shots on 
goal: SJ. (on Hrtxtey) 6-14-11— JX LA. (on 
Irbe) 15-11)6-44 

Quebec 0 1 1—2 

Montreal T 2 3— S 

First Period: M-Schnelder 19 (Odeleta. Bel- 
lows); tpp). Second Period: Q-Bossen 11 
(Bui Cher, Sutter); M-Schneider 20 (Dam- 
ohousse. Muller); M-Bellows 28 ( S chn e l 
der). Third Period: M-Danwhousse 34 (Bel- 
lows. LeCloIr); Q- Kovalenko 14 (K am en sk y, 
Slodln); I BP). M-Bellows 29 (SrtmeMer.Dom- 
phousse); (pp). Shots on goal; Q (on Ray) 13- 
8-10-31. M ion FIsetl 64-13-27. 

Detroit 2 0 6-2 

Winnipeg 2 10—4 

First Period: W- Emerson 26 (Quintal); D- 
Yzerman 20 (Ccftev): (pp). D-Yzerman 21 
(Siliinoer.acoorem); W-Stoen 18 (Ysebaert. 
Darryl Shannon). Second Period: W-Emer- 
son 27 (Darrin Shannan. Steen); W-Tkacfiuck 
36 (Manson); (op). Shota an goal: D (an Che- 
vektoe) 14-10-15 — 39. W (on Esseraa) 64-7-21. 


Final OVat Slalom standings: ?. Moyer, 496 
points; 2. Aamodt, 494; X Piccard, 414; a. Nv- 
benr. 384; S. Locher, 356; 6, von Gruenlgen, 
391 ; 7. Bur ne r s su l 308; X Mader, 295; 9, Bel- 
trend. 293; 10. Thoreen. 271. 

Final overall standhtgs: I, Aamodt. Nor- 
way, 1,397; X Marc GtrardeML Luxembourg, 
l A07; X Tomba 822; -1, Mader, 820; & Hannes 
Trlnkl. Austria, 701; 6. Thoreen, 657; 7. Klws. 
651: & Mae, 650; 9, SkflardoL 641; IX Cary 
Multan. Canada. 535. 

WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM 

Results Saturday hum Vail: 1. Mom no 
Ertt Germany. 2 minutes, 1854 seconds; X 
Vreni Schneider, Switzerland. 2 :19J2;X Anne 
Berea. Norway, 3:19.76; 4, Anita wackier, 
Austria 2:19.91; & Katta Seizing er, Germany. 
3:20 J)2: a. (tie) Eva Twardakens, United 
States ond Marianne K I oersted. Norway, 
2:2X15; X Corale Merle, France. 2:2026; 9. 
Soeto Premar, Sloven to. 2ri627; 10. links 
Hravat, Si oven la. 3:2636. 

11. Heidi Zeller-Boetiler. Switzer iaraf, 
2:2699; IX Heidi Voelker. United Slates, 
2:2148; IX Christina Meter, Germany, 
2:23-85; 14. Alenfco Davzon. Slovenia, 2^259; 
lXBIMona Perez. Italy, 2; 2633; Megan Bis- 
set, Canada, did not start first ran. Sophie 
LeFranc. France; Deb ora h Compognoni. Ita- 
ly; Leila Plcecrd. France; Sabina Panzanlnl, 
Italy; Sylvia Eder. Austria; Melanie Tur- 
oean. Canada and Anna Partaien, United 
States, did not finish first run. Gortnne Rev 
Bel let. Franca, did not finish second ran. 

Final Giant Statom standings: 1, wackier, 
635 Paints; X Schneider, 516; X Comoagnonl, 
515; 4. Ulrike Motor, Austria. <32: 5, Ertt. 360; 
6. Seizing er. 2SB; 7. Voelker.252; X Merle. 243; 
9. Twardakens. 234; 16 Meier. 219. 

Final overall standing*: 1. Sdmeidw. LSf 
potfrrs; 2. Pern I Ik) Wlbera. Sweden. 1,343; X 
Stozlnger. l.lfS: 4. wachter.lJi)35; X Ert.8B3; 4. 
CompagnonL 841 ; 7, Mater. 71 1 ; 6 Perez, 667; 9. 
Kjoerstad. 525; 16 Moreno Gallbta llatv. 505. 



MEN? GIANT SLALOM 

Resstts Saturday tram VoIL Cotorodo: 1, 
Kletll Andre Aamodt. Norway, 2 minutes, 25A3 
seconds; 1 Christian Mayer, Austria, 2 J5JD; X 
Sieve Locher. Swttzertend, 2.-2X88; A Franck 
Piccard. France. 2:2601; 5. Michael von 
Gruenigerv Switzerland. 2:26.16; 6. Motteo Beh 
Irand. Italy. 2.-26.17; 7, B ornh aiil Gstrrta Aus- 
tria 2:26X5; X Jan Elnor Thoriea Norway, 
2:2M0; 9, Guenther Mader. Austrta,2:2656; 10k 
Tobias B c nwree o L Germany, 2:2642. 

11, Lasse Klus. Norway, 2 :26J4; IX Gerhard 
Kaentasrolner, Italy. 2:26.95; IX Thomas 
Grand!, Canoda. 2:27.11; K Alberto Tomba, 
Italy, 2;Z7A6; 15. Markus Wos m e ler, Gormo- 
ny, 2:2653; 16. Rob Crassan, Canada, 2:3953; 
17, Paul Cow Puckett. Unttod Stotes-2: 30.94; 
IX Stefan Stankafla Germany. 2:3159; 19, 
a tie Skaordai, Norway. 2:32.14. 

Mltlo Kona Sloven lo; Rainer Satzaeber. 
Austria; Marc Glrardelll.LuMmbaura,' Rich- 
ard Kroet 1, Austria; Carv MuliervCanocta. and 
Tommy Mae. United States, did not finish first 
an Fredrik Nvberg, Sweden; Achim Vogt 
Liechtenstein; Ur* Koelki. Switzerland, and 
Jura Koslr.Stovenla,dld not finish second ran. 


Milan - San Remo 

Results Saturday in the mA Uenw t tr 
(TB2J2-mlle) race: 1, Giorgio Furtan. Italy, in 
seran hours. 5:37 minutes or 41 ASS kah ( 25.703 
mph); x Marfa anoilini. Italy. 20 seconds 
behind; X Adriano Baffl, Italy, soma time; 4. 
StefonoZaiinl. Italy. sJ.; 5 - KaIHundertmark, 
Germony.s.1.: 6. Fabto Botdolo. Italy. 6.1 J 7, 
Angel Edo, Spate, it.; X Fcrblano Fentanefll. 
Italy, sj.; 9, Andrei Tchmito.Mo)dova sJ-; 16 
Laurent Jatobert, France, s.t. 

World Cup sta a dleg s : I. Furtan, SO Mints; X 
CteoiilnL 35; X Botfl. 25; A Zoninl. 20; S, Hun- 
dertmorfc, 18; A BakJato, 16; 7. Edo, 14; 6 
Fontanel 1 1. 12; 9. Tchmile. 10; 10. JalaWrt, & 


DUTCH FIRST DIVISION 
Go Ahood Eogtos Deventer 0, FC Votondam 1 
MW Maastricht a VW Vento 0 
SC Heerenveen 1, mac Breda 3 
Willem ii Tilburg X Feyenoord Rotterdam 1 
Soorta Rotterdam 4, Cambuur Leeuwarden 0 
Vitesse Arnhem 1, Rada JC Kertcrade 3 
PSV Eindhoven 1, PC Utrecht 0 
PC Groningen I. RKC Wooiwifk 2 
Stand i n gs : Aiax Amstenkxn. 44 points; 
Feyenoord Rotterdam, 38; PSV Eindhoven, 34; 
NAC Breda and Roda JC Kericrade.32; Wlltom 
II TUburg and Vitesse Arnhem, 29; FCTwento 
Enschede and MW Maastricht. 37; Sparta 
Rotterdam, 25; Go Ahead Eaatos Deventer. 24; 
FC Utrecht. 25; VW Vente and SC Heeran- 
veen, 71; FC Votandanv 19; FC Groningen. M; 
Cambuur Leeuwatden, 14; RKCWaaiwi)k.1X 
ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Aston Villa 1, Oldham 2 
Leeds 1, Coventry 0 
Liverpool X Chelsea 1 
Manchester Cltv 6 Sheffield United 0 
Queens Park Rangers 1. Wimbledon 0 
Southampton 6 ArsenaM 
Swindon X Manchester United 2 
Tottenham 1. IpswIUi 1 
west Ham X Newcastle 4 
Sheffield Wednesday 1, Blackburn 2 
Standings: Manchester United. 72 points; 
Blackburn, 67; Newcastle and Arsenal, 57; 
Leedx 55; Liverpool. 53; Aston Villa 49; 
Queens Parte Rangers. -*7; Sheffield Wtafties- 
day.45; Narwlcn.44; WImbtodon,42,- Ipswich. 
40; Coventry and west Ham. 38; Evertoa 36; 
Chatsea.3S; Tottenham. 33; Southampton, 32; 
Manchester aty, 31 ; Oldham, 30; Sheffield 
United, 27; Swindon. 25. 

FRENCH CUP 
Third Rag 

Monaco a Marseille a 
Laval I. Montpellier 2 
Lens X Charlevflle I 
Guinaanw a Paris SL Germain I 
5eto 1, An* erre 4 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
MSV Duisburg 6 Hamburg SV 1 
VIB Leipzio X FC Cologne 3 
vtfi Stuttgart X Borasslo Mdladbori) 0 
S chalk e X Kartsratie SC 0 
SC Freiburg 6 FC Nuremberg 0 
Boyer Leveriuisen X FC Kaiserslautern 2 
Dynamo Dresden 6 ElntracJit Frankfurt 4 
Bayern Munich 6 Barussla Dortmund Q 
Standings: Bayern Munich. 33 potato; EM- 
Iracht Frankfurt. 33; Hamburg. 31; FC KpF 


26; Genoa, H; Roma 24; Udfnese. ! 
glana 21; Atotonta 17; Laced; rt'. : 

SPANISH FIRST DIVOMM; 
Athletic Bilbao t Celia I . - 
Valencia 1, Saortlng Gitan Q ' • ' - 
RovO Vafiecano X Seville J • • 

Lerlda 1. Real soctedad 0 • 

Attetlca Madrid 6 Real Zarema 4 
Real Oviedo 1, Osasuna 0 - 
Deoprtlvo Coruna 0.' Real Voitodaildl 
Racing Santander 1, Barceiena 1 
Log rones X Real Madrid 4. 

Tenerife X Aibacvto i 
Standings: Departlvo La ( 

Barcetona,39; Real Madrid, 38; 2 
Athletic Bilbao. 34; Sevilla and 1 
AJboceteand Valencia 30; Racing I 
and Real SodedOd. 29; Saarting- Gbon^B;' 
Oviedo. 27; Rovo Vollecana, 26; Cette 1 
Loaranes, 24; AMehco MadritL23; LertfA 
Valladolid, 22: Osasuna. 16 




Major League Scores * 

PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 
Friday's Results . ■ 
Las Angeles 7. Philadelphia 5 
Houston 9. Cleveland (ss) 5 
Toronto 4, Montreal X 10 tanlnas - ‘ , 

St. Louis 10, Chicago White Sox 8 , 

Balllmere (ss) X Minnesota 2 V k ‘_ 
Bolttmore (ss) Cleveland (ss) 8 
Detroit 14, Kansas aty 3 ■ 

Florida 10. New York Mefc 1 
Boston 16 Texas 4 , 

Milwaukee 11, Son Dtoao 18. 10 timings*. 
Seattle 9. Colorado I ' 

Oakland 16 Cotitornta 1 
Alton to 6 New York Yankees 5 * 

Cincinnati 6. Pittsburgh 2 ’ 

ChJcoso Cubs 9. San Francisco 8 u 
Saturday's Results 
Pti( lade Ionic 1. Toronto 0 
Pittsburah 6. Boston S 
Kansas City x Cinctanali 2 ■ 

Cieveksnd 14. Detroit 5 
Baltimore 11. Minnesota 9 
Montreal 5. Florida 2 
Las Anaetos V, ». Louis 5 
New York Mete a Atlanta 3 
Seattle 7, Colorado 0 
Oakland 6 San Diego 5 
Milwaukee 7. Chicago 4 
New York Yankees ) X Chicago V/hth»5e*i 
Houston 6 Texas 5 n 



sersiairtern. Karisruha SC and MSV Duis- 
burg, 29; Bayer Leverkinen. V»B Slutfgari. ** ‘ J 


— ni . - jL-tZ sac. sSC mi £ • - ±-2 

LIPTON CHAMPIONSHIP 
In Key Blscavne, Florida 
Men's Stogies, SemMaais 
Pete Sampras Cl). United States, def. Jim 
Courier (4j. United States. 6-4, 7-6 112-10); 
Andre Agassi (24). united States, def. Patrick 
Ratter. Australia, 6-2. t-4. 

Women's s mates, Float 
Steffi Grot (1 ). Germany, def. Natallo Zver- 
eva (9), Belarus, 4-6, 6-1, 6-2. 


Werder Bremen and Barussla Moencheng- 
todboch. 26; Dynamo Dresden. 25; Schalke. 
23; 5C Freiburg. 22; Nuremberg. 20; Watten- 
scheld, 16; Leiazla. 14. 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Caoltort 6 Somndarla 0 
Foagla I. Roma 1 
Genoa X Udlnese 0 
Juvertfus 4, Parma fl 
Lazio X Napoli 0 
Lecce X Crem o ne s e 4 
Piacenza 4, Atalanta D 
Reootona 1, Torino 0 
Steadings: AC Milan. 44 points; Sampdorta 
andjuventus.37; Lazio, 36; Par mo, 35: Torl- 
na39; Naooli and Interoaztonato, 28; Foggla 
and Cagliari, 27; CramonoM and Plocenzo. 


FIRST TEST 

India vs. New Zealand, Second Dor 1 
Sanday, Hi Hamilton, New Zealand 
Now Zeatera isi Innings: 13) 

India 13I Innings: W-3 ' 

SECOND TEST 

Australia *s. sown Africa. Fwato Day 

Sunday, in Caae Town -a, m 

Australia 1st innings: 435 Ile04 even) - , 

Smith Africa 2d Innings: 106* le» overt) . — — ' 

SECOND TEST .. . 

E eg land vs. West indies. Fourth Dot >■ - 
Sunday, la Georgetown, Guyana ■ 

England 1st Innings: 322 1 - 

West tadtos 1st tantags: 556 all out 

England 2d inmnas: 79-j •• .'-■■■■ 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



If* never boon easier to subscribe 
and save with our now 
tofl free service. 

Just call us today at 

05437437. 


4 . 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


Page 15 


M O 


A Y 




» /V ' 


SPORTS 

Boston College Stops N. Carolina, Marquette Downs Kentucky 

\0klahoma Suite , UMass Eliminated 





I The Associated Press 

I Using timdy 3-point shooting 
Sand hustling work on the boards, 

! Boston Colkge stunned top-ranked 
and defending champion North 
Carolina in the second round of the 
] NCAA tournament, 75-72, Sunday. 
1 The Eagles spoiled North Caroli- 
9 na’s bid to become the winnings 
{team in (he tournament's history, 
i Both the Tar Hcds and UCLA have 
won 63 games in the event. 

531 Curley scored 10 of Boston 
College’s last 1 1 points to lead the 
Eagles to victory in the East Re- 
gional game and end North Caroli- 
na's run of 1 3 consecutive appear- 
, ances in at least the regional 
semifinals. 

' Boston College secured its first 
i trip to the round of 16 since 1985 


by holding off the Tar Heels after 
they had rallied from a 14-point 
deficit in the second half. 

Down 50-36 with 17:34 left. 
North Carolina scored nine consec- 
utive points to start an 18-3 run 
that tied it at 53 on a follow dunk 
by Eric Mon truss with 11:01 left. 

The Tar Heels tied it again at 58, 
70 and 72 before Curley sank a pair 
of free throws to make it 74-72 with 
38.1 seconds to go. 

North Carolina's Jeff Mclnnis 
missed a jumper in the lane with 21 
seconds left, and the Eagles* Ger- 
rod Abram gpt the rebound. He 
was fouled with 17.6 seconds left 
and made one free throw. 

The Tar Heels called a timeout to 
set up a final play, which ended up 
being a 17-foot baseline jumper by 


out in their v 


in penttans 



)N 

r-_-. /. - 





XV- =■ 

ar**r 







Kansas’s Greg Ostertag Mocking Wake Forest’s Ton Duncan on 
the way to the Jayhawks’ triumph in flie Southeast Regional game. 


Wallace with five seconds left. The 
ball took a long bounce off the rim 
and Boston College's Howard Eis- 
ley tracked it down with two sec- 
onds left and ran out the dock. 

Indiana 67, Temple 58: Todd 
Leary scored 13 points in the sec- 
ond half and helped squash a Tem- 
ple comeback with a vital 3-pointer 
as Indiana and its coach, Bob 
Knight, advanced to the final 16 for 
the fourth straight year. 

Indiana was dinging to a 53-50 
lead before Leary hit a 3-pointer 
with 4:29 to go. After a basket by 
Aaron McKie, the Hoosieis' Alan 
Henderson made two free throws 
and Leary followed with a layup to 
make it 60-52 with 2:31 left. 

The Hoosiers made seven free 
throws in the final 1:17 of the East 
Regional game to keep Temple at 
bay. It is the third straight year that 
the Owls have had their tournament 
run ended by a Big 10 team. 

In other East Regional games, 
played Saturday: 

Florida 70, Pennsylvania 58: In 
Uniondale, New York, guards Dan 
Cross and Craig Brown combined 
for 16 points in a 20-9 surge mid- 
way through the second half to 
power Florida to victory. 

Cross, who finished with 22 
points, hit four straight shots in a 
1 :48 stretch of the second half as 
the Gators moved to a 42-37 lead. 
Penn closed to 44-43, and had a 
chance to go ahead. But Matt Ma- 
loney pulled up from 20 feet and 
shot an airbaO, his eighth mins from 
b ehin d the arc up to that point. 

Maloney, a 34-percent 3-point 
shooter and the Quakers’ leading 
scorer, finished just 2-for-16 from 
long range as Penn went 8-for-37 
from behind the arc. 

Connecticut 75, George Wash- 
ington 63: After trailing, 38-30, ear- 
ly m the second half, George Wash- 
ington came back to tie the score 
three times. Then the Huskies put 
on a 17-4 spurt that put them in 
front for good. 

Donydl Mar shall, hot at the 
start and finish, scored 18 points 
for Connecticut, but went nearly 24 
minutes in the middle of the game 
without a field goal. 

All of Marshall's points came in 
the game's first 11 minutes and 
final nine minutes. He missed ax of 
his last seven shots. It was the sec- 
ond time in two tournament games 
Marshall has been under 20. 

Ray Allen, who had a four-point 





Darid PUham/Thc Anochled Press 


Massachusetts guard Mike Williams, left, going down with the Terrapins’ forward Exree Hipp in a scramble for the ball during Maryland’s second-round upset victory. 


play during Connecticut's decisive 
run, and Danny Marshall had 14 
each for Connecticut. 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL 

Marquette 7S, Kentucky 6% On 
Sunday in Sl Petersburg, Florida, 
Tony Miller handled Kentucky’s 
defensive pressure and Marquette 
survived one of the Wildcats’ furi- 
ous second-half rallies to advance 
to the final 16 for the first time in 
15 years. 

Damon Key scored 25 points 
and Miller broke Kentucky's 
vaunted full-court trapping defense 
for a key basket as the sixth-seeded 
Warriors held on after blowing 
most erf an 18-point lead. 

Tony Delk scored 22 of his 24 
points in the second half as third- 
seeded Kentucky, which three 
times this season overcame double- 
digit dcEdts to win, rallied from a 
42-24 deficit. 


In games played Saturday: 

Purdue 83, Alabama 73: In Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, Purdue proved it 
could supply Glenn Robinson with 
hdp when necessary. Robinson 
had 33 points, but just six in the 
final IS minutes as the Boilermak- 
ers finished off the Crimson Tide. 

Alabama had wiped oat a nine- 
point halftime deficit with a 13-2 
surge for a 44-42 lead with 16:40 to 
play. Robinson, who scored Pur- 
due's first seven points of the sec- 
ond half, restored the Boilermak- 
ers’ lead on a layup with 15:10 to 
play find that turned things over to 
his teammates. 

Matt Waddell and Cuonzo Mar- 
tin had II points each, and Wad- 
dell added eight assists. Herb Dove 
finishe d with eight points, in elud- 
ing two impressive dunks, the first 
on a pass from Robinson. 

Kansas 69, Wake Forest 58: The 


Jay hawks advanced as Wake For- 
est went more than seven minutes 
without a field goal down the 
stretch. 

Kansas, which trailed 30-26 at 
halftime, used an 11-0 second-half 
run to seal its victory, getting a pair 
of three-point plays from freshman 
cents Scot Pollard in the decisive 
stretch. 

MIDWEST REGIONAL 

Trisa 82, Oklahoma St 80: On 
Sunday in Oklahoma City, Tulsa 
rallied from a I2-poini deficit in 
the second half behind Pooh Wil- 
liamson to upset the Nob 4 seed. 

Williamson scored 14 of his 20 
points in the second half and came 
up with several huge plays, but it 
was Lou Dawkins who finished off 
the Cowboys with a 3-pointer from 
the left comer with 8.6 seconds left. 
That gave Hthseeded Tulsa an 82- 
78 lead, and the Cowboys managed 


only a follow shot from Bryant 
Reeves before time expired. 

In gamer played Saturday: 

Maryland 95, Massachusetts 87: 
In Wichita, Kansas, the Minute- 
men became the highest seed to fall 
in the first two rounds of the tour- 
nament whai Maryland went on an 
18-3 run midway through the sec- 
ond half to produce an 82-68 lead 
with just over seven minutes left. 

Maryland trailed by five points 
at halftime but went to a full-court 
press in the second half that forced 
Massachusetts into errors and out 
of its offense. The Terrapins 
seemed to have the guards con- 
stantly in trouble at halfcoun. 

Michigan 84, Texas 79: Juwan 
Howard scored 34 points, and the 
Wolverines made 10 cf 11 free 
throws in the final 1:27. 

WEST REGIONAL 

Arizona 71, Virginia 58; On Sun- 
day in Sacramento, California, 


Khalid Reeves overcame a slow 
start to score 30 points and lead the 
Wildcats into the round of 16- 

While Reeves scored 21 second- 
half points by penetrating Virgin- 
ia’s defense, the rest of the Wildcats 
dominated the boards, 47-36, and 
held the Cavaliers scoreless for 
7:37 late in the game. % the time 
Harold Deane’s jumper ended Vir- 
ginia's drought with 2:20 remain- 
ing, Arizona held a 62-48 lead 

In games played Saturday: 

Syracuse 64, Wiseoush^Greeo 
Bay 59: In Ogden, Utah, Adrian 
Autry, who limped off the court 
with a braised knee moments earli- 
er, came back to score a basket and 
free throw in the final minute to 
help Syracuse escape. 

Missouri 109, Wisconsin 96: 
Missouri combined with Wisconan 
for an NCAA tournament record 
27 3-pointers in an intense but foul- 
filled game. 


fCnicks’ Defense Overcomes the Celtics sidelines 

The Associated Press . Sherman Douglas led Boston won at home for the first time in break, got 20 points from Grant Wilkins Puts Off Deal With Clippers 

. • i ... . ] -.I 'm L... in .ni.. D.V ilnamnuc 1 nM wi ILnT.17 chnnli'nff -X 


The Associated Press 

After 29 lead changes and 15 ties 
in the first three quarters, wfao’d 
have expected this one to be won 
by defense? 

But the Knicks hdd the Boston 
Celtics scoreless for the first 6:46 of 
the fourth quarter Saturday in New 
-York: and won, 105-91. 

Although they led Boston, 80-70, 
when they started their 16-0 ran, 

NBA HIGHLIGHTS 

the Knicks failed to hold their op- 
ponents to less than 90 prints for a 
ninth straight game. 

Instead, they just won their ninth 
in a row, getting 35 points and 14 
rebounds from Patrick Ewing. 

Tt was a great defensive effort at 

.the end,” Ewing said. “We were 

feally strong in the fourth quarter, 
which has become a habiL The bot- 
mm fine is the ninth straight win. 

- We're on a good roll now." 

■ New York will have to share the 
National Basketball A ssocia tion 
■ post-shot-dock record streak erf 
\ holding the opposition under 90 
" paints with the 1954-55 Syracuse 

- Nationals. 

' * Derek Harper added 17 points for 
' f5gw York, whDe Charles Oakley 
. hfl 16 and Rolando Blackman 13. 


. Sherman Douglas led Boston 
with 20 points and 10 assists. Rob- 
ert Parish, Rick Fox and Dino 
Radja each added 12. The Celtics 
have lost five straight. 

New York, which led 56-53 at 
the half, kept its hopes alive for the 
defensive record into the last min- 
ute, when Tony Harris, fresh off 
the bench for Boston, made a 3- 
printer with 50.1 seconds left. That 
made it 103-90, and New York 
fouled him in a futile effort to stop 
the attempt 

Spurs 107, Kings 100: David 
Robinson scored 48 points and 
grabbed 16 rebounds to lead San 
Antonio over visiting Sacramento. 

The Spurs 1 Dale Effis hit the 
1,000th 3-poinler of his career. The 
shot, his second of the game, came 
at the 7:41 mark of the third quarter. 
rails is the first player in basketball 
history with 1,000 3-pointers. 

Romnson was joined in double 
figures by EHi*, who had 18 points, 
and Willie Anderson, with 15. 

Suns 105, Nets 93: In Phoenix, 
Dan Majerle scored 14 of his 22 
points in the third quarter, helping 
the Suns hold onto a double-digit 
IftaH throughout the second half. 

Cedric (Shall os and A. C. Green 
had 18 points each for the Suns, 
who snapped a two-game skid and 


won at home for the first time in 
their last three games. 

Rockets 106, - Pistons 88: Mario 
Elie came off the bench in Houston 
to hit all nme of his shots and 
pulled down a career-high 15 re- 
bounds to hdp stop Detroit. 

Elie scored 21 points, his second 
highest total of the season, as the 
Rockets won their fourth straight 
game to maintain their half-game 
lead over San Antonio in the Mid- 
west Division. 

Hie loss snapped a three-game 
winning streak for Detroit. 

Hakeem Olajuwon scored 32 
points and had 1 1 rebounds to lead 
five Rockets in double figures. 

Warriors 116, Mavericks 107: In 
Dallas, Lalrefi Sprewefi scored 24 
prints and three teammates added 
20 car more points for Golden State, 
which snapped a seven-game road 
losing streak. 

Chris Gatling contributed 21 
points and Billy Owens and Chris 
Mullin bad 20 each as the Warriors 
beat Ibe Mavericks for the 13th 
straight time. 

Heat 106, Cavafiers 95: Glen 
Rice scored 33 prints and Brian 
Shaw had 15 assists to hdp the 
Heat win their fourth straight by 
defeating visiting Cleveland. 

The Heat, 14-3 since the All-Star 


break, got 20 points from Grant 
Long on 9 L of-12 shooting. 

Rony Seikaly scored 15 prints 
and grabbed nine rebounds for Mi- 
ami, which is now 10 games over- 
300 for the first time this season. 

The Cavaliers have dropped five 
straight after tying a franchise re- 
cord with an 11-game winning 
streak. 

Pacers 107, Jazz 103: In India- 
napolis, Rik Smits hit two free 
throws to break a tie with 34.8 
seconds to play to lead Indiana and 
hand Utah its third straight loss. 

The Paces took a 15-point lead 
into the fourth quarter and led by 
18 with 9:29 to play. The Jazz then 
rallied behind Karl Malone, who 
scored 16 of his season-high 37 
points in the fourth quarter. 

Malone twice tied the game, the 
second time with 1:11 toplay at 101- 
101. He missed a chance to put Utah 
ahead when he missed a free throw. 

Smits and Jeff Horaacek matched 
free throws Tor a 103-103 tie before 
Smits, who led the Pacers with 19 
prints, was fouled by Felton Spen- 
cer. After he made both shots, Tom 
Chambers 1 runner was Mocked by 
Dale Davis. Reggie Miller made one 
free throw, and Sam Mitchell hh 
another after Jeff Horaacek missed 
a 3-point try to tie. 


___ '-m-m yy-i vi* 9 k FW1 1 I W/ /* ~W~h • MT world championships and Olympic Games," Digri said. 

Tall (Golf ers) Tale: Woes of a Big Man E n™mirm«,Te m i 8 sto,i 8 De^ 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

SINTRA, Portugal — Never mind trymg 
to find dothes off the rack, a cMjfajaWe 
economy seat on an airplane or a hotel two 
long enough. The hardest thing m theworid 

for a tall guy is to hit a goHball prop^ty. 

A tall guy walks onto the fast tee with his 
fat-headed driver knowing that everyone is 
tmectma the ball to create a sonic boom. 
iSepeople don’t know the doubts festering 
m the mind of a tall gay- . 

“We have to be more accurate v/ith 


j 3 


■•JS 





. v »*’»*•£? ■> 




swing,” said Robert 

' feet 5 beta (1.95 metos) ‘HSffSK 
. on the PGA European T ^v 

' the HadkswiniL our aims are farther from tne 
! ban Th e further distance from the arnsio 
-4 the ball, the longer tune it takes to 

■ Whmyou can control it, it can beanadwuo- 
*?• tage —the wider the arc, the more speed you 
V. ' can create, definitely.” 

The overwhelming problem — even ly 
• r. Karlsson - is that the clubs area t ong 
’>■' enough. Sure, blame the equipment, bunt’s 

i i true. Extra-long chibs ar ®* on J^_Lj h Lc 
Jf half-inch. Short guys can buy extra-teu beds 
< that bi & Tall gSys need ttjfcri* dubs. 
“It made me fade everything, said Karls- 
son,25.Hefadede«^»Sj*““^. 

; awfiWigfESvs 

different thafl a You are 

back far enough to lake advantage oime 


guy’s theoretically “wider are." The guide- 
books advise you to “stand comfortably over 
the balL” At the top of the swing, the tall guy 
feels like a pretzel 

Bran in Sl Malm, Sweden, Karlsson was 
the son of a greens-kccpcr. They lived near 
the fourth green of the golf coarse. No one 
ever tried to tell him that he was taking up the 
wrong sport, because there isn’t much basket- 
ball in Sweden. If there was basketball in 
Sweden, everyone would have been telling 
him be ought to play baskctbal 

“ Do you play basketball?' I hear that 
question all the time,” Karlsson said. 

In Sweden? 

“Yes." 

It’s official then. The entire weald believes 
that every tall guy is a basketball player. 

Playing with extra-long dubs that were too 
short for tan, Karlsson almost beat Nick 
Faldo at the European Open in 1991 It was 
one of the most gigantic final rounds ever. 
Faldo is 6 feet 3. 

“Faldo is very tall and he is (me of the 
greatest of all time,” Karlsson said. 

I year. Karlsson began to work with the 
coach Simon Holmes, a protfcgfc of Faldo’s 
coach, David Leadbeuer. 

“The first thing Simon told me was, ‘If 
you’re going to get better, we’re gang to have 
to change your set-up,’ " Karlsson said 

He ordered a new set of duM — 2 inches 
longer than normal 

In golf terms, these dubs were like the huge 
gun CUnt Eastwood was carrying around in 
die last Dirty Hany movie. The reason you 
can't normally buy such extra-extra-extra- 
long dubs is because the extra length makes 
them too heavy. In Karisson's case, a lot of 


the extra weight was shaved off the chib head, 
and die shafts were made thinner near the 
hoseL At last he could stand upright over the 
hall like lan Woosnam, the 5 foot 41/2 inch 
Welshman who hits it farther than most tall 
guys. At last he was comfortable. 

“Except that the ball would go all over the 
place,” Karlsson said. T didn’t know where I 
was going to hit it" 

They spent last year solving the new prob- 
lems. He grew used to his new address. The 
dubs were adjusted and rebuilt over and over 
to his specifications. Karlsson. has heard that 
only two other professionals are using dubs 

like Ins, but he doesn’t know thar names. He 

is hoping that they wQl soon bear all about 
him. 

He tied for 17th at 3 -over-par 287 Sunday 
in the Portuguese Open at the beautiful new 
Penha Longa Golf Gub, built around a 14th- 
century former monastery whose histone 
buildings are part of the course. 

Phillip Price of Wales shot a final-round 
one-ovcr-par 72 for a total of 278 to win the 
tournament by four strokes, his first PGA 
European Tour victory. 

Karlsson is ranked 16th in Europe with 
almost £42,000 in earnings this yea r. Next 
month he will spend 10 days in Florid a wit h 
Holmes working to control his monstrous 
and skinny driver. After Britain, Sweden pro- 
rides the greatest hope for the next genera- 
tion of European golfers, but no hopes are 
higher than Karissoo’s. 

“We have five or six players in the world 
top 100, but we don’t have one in the top 50,” 
he said. “We need one great player to come 
through.” 


LA QUINTA, California (AP) — Ellsworth Vines, 82, who won three 
Grand Slam tennis tournament titles in the early 19305, died of complica- 
tions of kidney disease. 

Vines, who died here Thursday, won the UJL Nationals, now the U.S. 
Open, in 1931 and again in 1932, the year be also won Wimbledon. 

A right-hander with an aggressive serve- and- volley style. Vines was 
widely regarded as one of the greatest players of his era. 

For the Record 

Cambridge won the women’s version of the University Boat Race on 
Sunday with a one-length victory over Oxford. (AP) 

Orznbek Nazarov of Kyrgyzstan retained his World Boxing Associa- 
tion lightweight title with a prints victory over the former champion 
Dingaan Umbria of South Africa on Saturday in Pretoria. (Reuters) 
Giorgio Parian of Italy, winner of six races this season, added the 
Milan-Safl Remo cycling classic to his tally Saturday, breaking away 
from his rivals well before the end. (Reuters) 


LIVING IN THE U.S.? 
Now Printed in 
New Drk 
for Same Day 
Delivery in Key Cities 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-38901 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COUID AFFECT 
YOUR LIFE: 


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dominique Wilkins has told the Los Angeles 
Clippers that be would become an unrestricted free agent at the rod of the 
season rather than immediately sign with his new NBA team. 

Wmdns, 34, is seeking $18 nnffion over three years, while the Clippers 
reportedly are offering a two-year deal. He and his agent, Steve Kauffman, 
told the Dippers on Friday that they wiD wait until July 1, when he can 
become an unrestricted free agent, before considering a new contract. The 
Clippers acquired Wilkins from the Atlanta Hawks Feb. 24 in exchange for 
Danny Manning. Wilkins is making $3.5 million this season. 

“Yon never want to say never, but it’s highly unlikely," Kauffman said 
of the possibility of reaching a Clippers agreement before July. He said 
there were no further talks planned with the team. Kauffman’s remarks 
were reported Sunday by the Los Angeles Daily News. 

Koss Captures Speed-Skating Tide 

HEERENVEEN, Netherlands (AP) — Johann-Olav Koss, who won 
three Olympic gold medals and a third world all-around championship 
and set numerous world records along the way, capped a remarkable 
season Sunday with a World Cup speed-skating title. 

Koss, who won bis third world championship a week ago, finished less 
than a second behind countryman KjeD Stordid in the final race of the year, 
the 10,000, but it was good enough to earn him the season distance crown. 

Manabu Hoiii of Japan broke the track record in the final 500-meter 
race of the World Cup to beat Dan Jansen of the United States, but 
Jansen stiD dahned the season crown. 

Germans Press for Wider Drug Tests 

BONN (Reuters) — The German athletics federation will demand that 
all athletes taking part in major competitions produce evidence that they 
have taken out-of-competition tests. 

The federation's president, Helmut Digri, told German radio on 
Sunday that it would ask the International Amateur Athletic Federation 
to change its rules at its biennial congress before next year’s world 
champ i onship s in Gothenburg, Sweden. 

“Athletes must bring with than documents proving they have also taken 
out-of-competition tests in order to be allowed to compete in European and 
world championships and Olympic Games," Digri said. 



FOLLOW THE WORLD EVERY DAY IN THE IHT 

Subscribe now O/q off tfte 

and save up to -MJ W cover price 


S GnwBnatn 
= Greece 


k.l -x ••••• fc.v > V v,. ...... ; .■mi. .Is'cjm ; <»'. 

CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AUSTRIA: 06608155 LUXEMBOURG: 08002703 

BQGWM: 0800 1 7538 5WII2ERLAND: 1555757 

FRANCE 05437 437 THE FC1EBHAM5S: 060225158 

GERMANY: 0130848585 UN1ED KINGDOM: 0800 895965 

> -V :>y,- .* s"? 

mm __ 

Umpniiw "' .J Bwonttw 3 month* 

CaxttyCunncy + 3 month* * 1 month + 13 FREE 

FRg jfqr.'t.yi— FREE 

i A. Sch. M00 3300 1300 

v aft 14.000 7joo 4300 

u> Oxr. l 3300 ■ 1300 1350 

1 fSA 2300 1300 700 

: FT. 1350 . ■ gU 1J70 sea 

r£ DU 700 ‘-r'y'T 3»5 210 

9«ta* t 210 •' j“3gQ 115 65 

> Or 7E300 41300 mimn 

Ort 230 12S W 

Ur* 500300 V£^g gSAOO 180300 

mi L_ft 143QQ ••• van “ • 7300 4300 

IPfA R 770 ->V- •*'<»• ' ^ 420 230 

< HKf. 3300 ' - r ' 1J00 1350 

a §« 47300 ag <•• •« 28300 14300 

£«* 40.000 ■ -V a* s v- 26300 14300 

ddh Madrid PW 55300 ■ \ ■* 27300 14300 

niagmag SJV. 3.100 jBlLj 1.700 900 


§• NflWtor*, R 770 •>V--if4 420 230 

| Norway UKr. 3300 ' - r 1300 1360 

w Portugal Esc 47300 -1 28300 14300 

1 Stan P«» 48,000 y •VatV- 26300 14300 

-hand aalfr MaMd Paa 55300 . \ ■> 27300 14300 

Sweden (agmaa S.Hr. 3,100 1,700 goo 

- hand detwery SJir 3300 . 1300 1300 

Suzsriand Sfr. bio IBS 

Rear ol e> CS S 405 • 265 146 

CS. M Abies. tamer .*..■»„« 1 

French Wntan. MMdte Ead 5 630 : 345 190 

(kd Simes. As®. Central and p '■ y,x V 'i 

SoutiAmerta S 7M ' ■ * 430 236 

Rea d AInca 5} 800 4fl6 370 

" Fw Mormaaon concenwig hend-detamy In motor Oorman etw cafl to! fmo IHT 
GanTany at 0130-84 BS 85 or tea (DOB) 175313. Undsr Gemori roguUtionr,. a ?«nk 
HWponWBQBntefl (oral new orflets 

Ye5, 1 wonflo start receiving the IHT. This is Ihe subscription term I prater 

[check appropriate boxes): 

□ 12 months (364 issues in all with 52 bonus issues). 

G 6 months (182 issues in aH with 26 bonus Issues). 

□ 3 months (91 issues in all with 13 bonus issues). 

B My chedc is enclosed (payable to the IrtfemationaJ Herald Tribune). 
Please charge my: G American Express □ Diners Chib □ VISA 
D MasterCard □ Eurocard □ Access 

Credit card charges wiH be made in French Times at current exchange rates. 

CARDACCT NO 21 - 3-94 

EXP. DATE SIGNATURE 

FOR BUSItiCSS OfiDStS, PLEASE INDICA i TlYOlXyAINLIMfiB^ 

(IHT VAT number FR 74732021 1 26 M 

G AV.G MnO Mis fAMlY NAME 


FIRST NAME 

PBRMANB'TT AD0RES5: D HOME G BUSINESS. 


cm /CODE. 


Fax: 33.1^6370651 --fct 




Jhis offer expires Worth J I. J 994, end is available to new subscribers criy 
7 f fl V ivrumniMi s t 

licralo^^fe.Snbum* 







Page 16 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, MARCH 21, 1994 


Jean Moulin: A Hero Finds His Boswell 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 


p AR1S — To an English intelligence 


r who quest o 

First Class Frenchman who can really help 
us in our war effort.” 

In France, he is immortalized in ihe 
Pantbdoa as a national hero yet still, in 
many respects, remains an enigma. 

To Daniel Cordier, his secretary in 
World War n, the Resistance leader Jean 
Moulin was simply “the boss.” 

It is to Cordier that one now must turn 
to Gnd out what kind of a man Moulin 
was, and what drove him to rebel against 
the wartime Vichy regime when so many 
others in his position did not. 

Cordier is halfway through publishing a 
monumental ax-volume biography of his 
former mentor that leaves Mouhn's status 
'as a hero intact, but that demolishes many 
of the myths that provide the political and 
moral underpinnings of postwar France. 

Did the French, for example, stand up 
massively and resolutely against the Nazi 
invader? No, says Cordier. 

Did they reject the Vichy regime, with 
its leanings toward Germany and its race 
hatred? Absolutely not, be says. Most po> 
pie saw the Vichy leader, Marshal Philippe 
Pfetain, as the legitimate head of state. 

Did the French in general support the 
Resistance? Cordier can find no evidence 
of it. 

Did they flock behind General Charles 
de Gaulle when he called on (he nation to 
resist? Again no, says Cordier. 

De Gaulle’s was a lonely voice for most 
of the war. and the Resistance members 
“were considered to be traitors,’* Cordier 
recalled in an interview. Stuffy friends of 
his bourgeois, monarchist family in Bor- 
deaux sniffed: “How terrible! Young Cor- 
dier has become a terrorist.” 

If his biography, called “Jean Moulin: 
LTnconnu du Panthdoa,” takes 8.000 
pages to tefl his story, it is because Cordier 
pays minute attention to detail and be- 
cause every fact and every statement is 
backed up by a quotation of the primary 
source material. 

The project dates from 1977, when Cor- 
dier appeared on a television show with 
other Resistance figures, having put the 
war out of his mind for more than 30 years 
and become a successful art dealer. He was 
astonished to hear Henri Frenay, the for- 
mer commander of Combat, which was 
one of the main Resistance groups, de- 
scribe Moulin as a crypto-CommunisL 

Moulin was undeniably a man of the 
Left, but Cordier never had cause to sus- 
pect that his chief favored Communists in 
the Resistance or had any relations with 
Moscow. The issue has surged again with 



John Fak* i Combat CoOeaion EmCfcr 

Daniel Cordier (left) is writing a six-volume biography of Moulin. 


the publication of a book by the historian 
Thierry Wolton, based partly on Moscow 
sources, suggesting that Moulin was a So- 
viet agenL Wolton has sued Cordier for 
libel for calling him a revisionist, and Cor- 
dier is planning to go to Moscow at the 
end of this month to do his own research 
into the archives. 

After hearing Frenay’s accusation, Cor- 
dier decided to search for the truth about 
the man for whom be had worked so 
closely, but whom he realized be did not 
know at all Indeed, Cordier did not dis- 
cover Moulin's real name until after the 
war. “That may shock you." he said, “but 
it simply did not interest me at the time. 
Forme, he was not a national hero but the 
boss of a young man of 22.” 

Cordier read the plethora of memoirs 
about the wartime Resistance, and found 
them all wrong in one detail or another, 
even de Gaulle’s. So he decided from the 
start that if he was going to write the 
definitive book about Moulin, he was not 
going to rdy on anyone's memory, and 
especially not his own. The biography was 
to be rigorously based on documents so 
that readers could judge the evidence and 
make up their own minds. 

“I abandoned everything and did two 


years of research in 1978 and 1979 for the 
wartime period,” Cordier said. “My origi- 
nal intention was to publish only the docu- 
ments pertaining to Moulin's missi on in 
the Resistance. 


“But then I realized I couldn't publish 
three volumes about his 17 months in the 
Resistance and only a few pages on his 
Hist 40 yean. Besides, although I was sure 
of Moulin’s position during the occupa- 
tion, Frenay was making these accusations 
and I wanted to be sure about Moulin's 
position before the war.” 

As a result. Cordier bought a camper, 
fitted his office and tiles inside, and went 
to every place in France where Moulin had 
worked, seeking any document that could 
shed light on his subject This provided the 
material for the first two volumes dealing 
not only with Moulin’s early life, but with 
the state of France in the years leading up 
to World War II. 


Before the war, Moulin had worked 
through the ranks of the administration to 
become prefect, or administrative head, in 
Chartres. When the Gomans invaded, 
Moulin remained at his posL The invaders 
tried to make him sign a document incul- 
pating black Senegalese soldiers in murder 


and rape. Moulin cm his throat rather 
than siga He was treated, then Bred. 

Other administrators remained at their 
posts, like Maurice Papon, the former po- 
lice chief in Bordeaux who now is accused 
of crimes against humanity for helping to 
round up and deport Jews. The case has 
dragged on for so long that it seems un- 
likely ever to come to trial 

But a former member of the pro-Nazi 
French militia, Paul Touvier. 78, went on 
trial in Versailles on Thursday, accused of 
a crime against humanity for authorizing 
the murder of seven Jews in Lyons. It is the 
first such trial of a French collaborator 
since the war. 

Moulin, who made his way to de 
Gaulle’s headquarters in London by devi- 
ous means, was one of extremely few se- 
nior French officials to recognize the ob- 
scure general as the future savior of bis 
country. “The Free French forces amount- 
ed only to a few hundred men," said Cor- 
dier. who went to England for mflitary 
training and was parachuted back into 
France in the summer of 1942. “But de 
Gaulle appeared before us like the com- 
mander of a victorious army.” 

Moulin, the left-wing professional ad- 
ministrator, and de Gaulle, tbe right-wing 
general got on well because both dearly 
understood the process of giving and re- 
ceiving orders, Cordier said. 

Moulin was parachuted into France as 
de Gaulle's representative and in 17 
months succeeded in forging the disparate 
Resistance groups into a united movement 
under tbe general’s command Then be 
was betrayed captured and tortured to 
death by tbe Germans. “1 believe be told 
them nothing, not even his name,” Cordier 
said Had they known who be really was. 
the Nazis surely would have kept Moulin 
alive as a propaganda coup. 

After his arrival in Lyons, Cordier went 
to dinn er with Moulin and poured out the 
details of his monarchist, nationalist and 
rightist upbringing. Moulin’s only com- 
ment was that this made him appreciate 
tbe value of a republican education. And 
then he offered Cordier the secretary'sjob. 
This entailed long hours of administrative 
duties, coding ana decoding messages and 
operating a radio transmitter and receiver. 

As a result, Cordier amassed a huge 
number of documents about the Resis- 
tance to which he has added by trawling 
ust about every contemporary archive in 
"'ranee. He has 10,000 photocopied docu- 
ments at his home in Juan-les-Pim, where 
be is putting tbe final touches on the 
biography. As someone who came late to 
writing history, he said. “There were many 
reasons why I should not have taken on 
this task. But finally it came down to a 
moral question. I had to do it for Moulin's 


t 


sake.* 


LANGUAGE 


Playing Mind and Head Games 


By William Safire 

N EW YORK — “1 decided not 
to play any mind games with 
myself,” Nancy Kerrigan told re- 
porters after winning die Olympic 
silver medal for figure skating, “to 
question myself, because I knew I 
was capable of this ” 

She probably took that locution 
from the cover of U. S. News the 
week before. "Mind Games" was 
the newsmagazine's cover title, 
alongside a picture of the skater, 
the subhead was “Nancy' Kerri- 
gan’s mental struggle. . . . How 
champions steel themselves to 
win.” 

Only a couple of months before, 
the political campaign consultant 
Ed Rolliiis was explaining Ms fiction 
about paying ministers in a New 
Jersey* campaign as merely “playing 
mind games with Jim Carvifle," Ms 
opposite number in the race. 

And this postcard came in from 
Joan Macey, in Binghamton. New 
York: “We were discussing person- 
al ads. and didn't know what 'no 
mind games' or ‘no head games’ 
meant. Perhaps you could eluci- 
date” 

Ever the slave to primary sources, 
f went through the personal ads in 
my Village Voice. Under “Men 
Seeking Women.” this ad stood out: 
“SWM [single white male], 27, 5-10, 
brown hair, blue eyes, muscular 
build, hot blooded [apparently too 
passionate to hyphenate], seeking 
SF [ sing le female], no kids, who is 
voluptuous and who has good mor- 
als and manners. No head games." 
In man y other ads. tbe hcrt-blooded- 
ness is ignored, and the mind-game- 
less “commitment” and “honesty” 
are stressed. 

What is (his game that is so uni- 
versally derogated? The lexicogra- 
pher Anne Soukhanov, after a brief 
study of the language of manipula- 
tion as it relates to personal ads. 
reports that the ratio of ads with 
the header of games ran 5 female to 
1 male. That suggests women are 
more conscious of, and resistant to. 
the dread game. 

Head gained a sense of druggi- 
ness in the ’60s: To go on a head 
trip, you went to a head shop and 
bought a head drug In this sense, 
the head was not the skull with hair 
on top, but the thinking that went 
on within; this intercourse with. in- 
trospection was also expressed in 
the heavy use of the word mind, as 


in the lyric ‘The Windmills of Your 
Mind” by Marilyn Bergman 

(ASCAFs new president) and Alan 
Bergman, and the description of 


some drugs as mind-altering and 
"" vent 


mind-bending. The '50s vert) “to 
brainwash” was replaced by a hy- 
phenated term suggesting copula- 
tion with the minaT In 1 973, John 
Lennon wrote “Mind Games, ” tak- 
ing this sense of mind into game 
theory. 

The Soukhanov theory is that we 
have come full circle: The resent- 
ment at mind games, as well as the 
desire for “honesty . . - reader to 
settle down . . . commitment in 
many persona! ads, suggests that 
the American Family Dream of the 
’50s has been recast into "90s ex- 
pressions derived from the counter- 
culture of the '60s. 

Playing games, without the head 
or mmd, has long had a slang sense 
of deceptiveness, evasion, or ma- 
nipulation; the addition, of the 
counterculture favorites under- 
scores the resentment of the 
psyched-oul marionette toward the 
puppet master. 

□ 

“On Looking Into tbe Abyss” is 
the title of a book of politically in- 
correct essays — she calls them “un- 
timely thoughts” — by Gertrude 
Himmdfarb. Tbe title piece derides 
Derrida and historical deconstruc- 
tionists who look at “history from 
below,” ignoring heroes and villains. 
“If it cannot take the measure of 
greatness.” she writes, “neither can 
it appreciate tbe enormity of evil.” 

Note the use of enormity in the 
way generations of usagists have 
considered correct: “huge wicked- 
ness.” They have bdd that enormity 
should be limi ted to descriptions of 
evfl, and that enormousness or some 
other noun like immensity be used 
for good as wefl as bad things of 
great size. 

Now consider this line in Presi- 
dent Clinton's most recent State of 
the Union address: “Our support 
of reform most combine patience 
for tbe enormity of the task and 
vigilance for our fundamental in- 
terests and values.” 

Barbara Balpb of New York, 
who is as well-trained and conser- 
vative as Bea Krislol (Gertrude 
Hirarodfarb’s nonliterary name) in 
proper English usage, objects: “If it 
were an enormity, my patience 
would be short-lived. The president 
subverted his meaning.” 


I think not. A dozen years ago. \ 
abandoned the ramparts on the 
limitation of enormity to wicked- 
ness. Tbe phrase “enormity of ih e 
task ” is familiar enough to be I 
dichi (and for that reason mjghi 1 
well be eschewed by presidential i 
speech writers), which brings iteas- j 
iJy to the mental tongue of Nod* i 
Loquendi. It would be nice for lin- 
guistic precision to be able to direct 
the English-speaking world to re- 
stria enormity to big evil and to use 
enormousness for big good, but the 
world doesn't always follow orders 
What Norma wants. Nonna 
gets; 1 know that sounds loose?, 
goosey. but if the native speakers 
want to use a word in a new oj 
broader sense, and persistently ig- 
nore all authoritarian strictures to 
the contrary, then that usage be- 
comes “correct.” Consider thesaa 
advice of Claude Swanson, FDR j 
secretary of the navy, on the sub 



ject of acquiescence to the ineviu- 


upper 


When the water reaches the 
level follow the rats.’ 


as the First Law of language 
Mavenhood directs: “Know who 
to bold 'em and know when to fold 
’em.” The unrestricted use of enar- 
mitv is no huge deal. 

□ 

An etymological find! Phrase, 
dicks have long attributed political- 
ly correct, the most damaging 
charge of lockstep thinlcfng ^ 
party-lining in recent ideological 
warfare, to Chairman Mao’s link 
red book of the 1960s. 

Now comes Professor Irving 
Lewis Allen, of the University of 
Connecticut, with an earlier cita- 
tion. Writing in a forthcoming issue 
of American Speech, which vf 
come out when it comes out. fie 
finds the full phrase in Vbdunir 
Nabokov's 1947 novel “Bend Sin- 
ister,” a fantasy about a downfall 
dictator “It is better for a man lo 
have belonged to a politically incor- 
rect organization,” goes a fictional 
article in the stale-controlled press, 
“than not lo have belonged to any 
organization at all.” 

The author of “Lolita” has there- 
by earned a place in the hearts of 
linguistic heavy hitters. 

4 Ve*r York Tima Service 





INTERNATIONAL I 
CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page i2 




WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


• ■- : 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 


Hlgl. 

Um 

W 

Wflta 

Low W 


OF 

Of 


OF 

CZF 

Mg»w 

16/54 

12*3 pc 

21/70 

1467 a 

AiTOtmhm 

B/43 

4*9 

»*■ 

11*2 

7/44 ril 

Altai 

13* 

3/37 


14*7 

3/37 a 

Afwra 

18/64 

0/46 

* 

19*4 

10*0 a 

Bwraton* 

17/62 

SMS 


19*8 

11/52 pc 


13/56 

8M3 

c 

13/55 

307 a 

Bain 

6/43 

-3/27 


0/46 

2*5 c 

Bronx* 

BUB 

4*9 


14*7 

7/44 C 

BudipoP 

0146 

2S& 


8*46 

2*5 s 

Copenhagen 

3J0T 

-3 nr 

( 

6M1 

2/35 c 

CocIh OdSof 

17*2 

12*3 

pc 

19*8 

13*5 » 

l***l 

8/46 

a/46 

r 

14*7 

8/48 c 

EdHwtfi 

7M4 

7/44 

rii 

11*2 

7/44 r 

Rnronca 

15*1 

8M6 s 

16*1 

8/43 a 

FianUurl 

5M1 

1/34 

rii 

7/44 

104 c 

Geneva 

11/52 

4*9 

rii 

14*7 

6/43 » 

HefeWd 

-3137 

■10/15 


-3137 

■7/20 c 

tawfci* 

15*1 

7/*4 


14*7 

8/43 a 

Lbs Psfcnos 

24/75 

14*/ 


23/73 

18*1 s 

Lirtxm 

17*2 

1162 


19*6 

13*5 a 

Londtxi 

10/50 

7/44 

ah 

16*8 

9/48 c 

Mw*H 

18*4 

5H1 

pc 22/71 

11*2 a 

Ufan 

14/57 

B/43 

c 

18*1 

7/44 a 

Moscow 

1*4 

-6*8 

ri 

sen 

-8/10 » 

Mro** 

7/44 

1*4 

f 

11*2 

2*5 a 

Kca 

18*1 

8/45 


17*2 

9M8 a 

O*. 

SOT 

-««« pc 

«M3 

-1*1 «i 

Paknn 

1BAJ1 

11*2 


18*4 

12*3 pc 

Pans 

12*3 

8/43 

rii 

17*2 

9MB pc 


5/41 

-2*9 

1 

7/44 

002 pc 

Rayt+w* 

3*7 

2*9 

r 

H/43 

1*4 pe 

Rum 

18*4 

9/48 

a 

20*6 

7/44 a 

SI Pstnbura -0/27 

■Prtfl 

Mi 

-3/27 -10/15 pc 

StocHwkn 

1*4 

-8*2 

s 

2*5 

■2/29 c 

SbastouH 

fl/48 

2*5 

r 

14*7 

6/43 pc 

Tatan 

-3/27 

-an« 


-4«b 

■6/22 c 

Venien 

13*5 

8/46 

c 

13/55 

7/44 1 

Vfenna 

9/48 

307 

V 

9/48 

205 a 

Warsaw 

4*9 

-7/20 

ri 

3*7 


2sfch 

11*2 

30/ 

* 

14/57 

8/43 pc 

Oceania 

AuAfanrf 

19*5 

12/53 

a 

20*8 

1467 pc 

Syrtoey 

23/73 

18*1 

pc 

24/73 

17*2 a 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Asia 



North America 
Houston and Dellas will be 
rather warm Tuesday. 
Wednesday and probably 
Thursday. Warm weather 
with hazy nxisMne wft occur 
in Mexico City much of this 
week. Rattier sunny and mfld 
in Washington, D.C.. end 
New York City Wednesday 
and Thursday. 


Europe 

High winds and rains will 
make lor an Intermittently 
sonny time from Ireland and 
northern U.K. to Norway. 
Denmark and northern Ger- 
many. Toward the south. It 
wll be warm wtti same sun, 
and much less wind end 
rain. Warm, sunlit weather 
will Include ihe western 
Medterranean lands. 


Asia 

Rein wilt fall In Korea and 
southwestern Japan Tues- 
day with leftover showers at 
midweek. Tokyo will turn 
rainy by Wednesday. The 
period aril begin with show- 
ers in Taiwan, South China 
and Hong Kong, and maybe 
Shanghai; drier weather 
should follow. 0 eying w» be 
chSy and mostly dry. 


Asia 


Today 

Tomorrow 


«08 

Low W 

M* 

Low W 


C/F 

OF 

OF 

OF 

Ban*A 

32*9 

28/79 1 

33*1 

25/77 pc 

Betas 

11*2 

205 ril 

8/43 

-4/25 pc 

HwflKong 

19/60 

17*2 ril 

18/84 

11*2 e 

Manta 

33*1 

22/71 pe 

32*9 

22/71 pc 

NawOriH 

34*3 

17*2 a 

34*3 

17*2 a 

Sari 

7M4 

408 rii 

9/49 

0/27 e 

ff— Jtol 

15*9 

8/48 ill 

1365 

3*7 e 

?^P 

31 /BE 
33173 

24/75 pc 
<569 e 

91*8 

20*0 

24/75 pc 
14/57 r 

T°V> 

10*0 

2*5 l 

12*3 

4/39 pc 

Africa 

Afctara 

19*6 

12*3 a 

19*8 

12*3 pc 

Cope Town 

24/76 

17*2 s 

26/79 

15*9 pc 

CostataEa 

18*4 

1/48 s 

20*8 

12*3 pc 

Hwsre 

28*2 

11*2 pc 

28*2 

11*2 pe 

L*7» 

31*8 

28/79 pc 

32*9 

28 m pe 

Ntori 

25/77 

1162 a 

28/79 

13*5 pc 

T»»ta 

24 r* 

10*0 a 

21/70 

TM4 pc 

North America 


ACROSS 


i Bakery 
byproduct 
6 Went by plane 
loCopied 

14 Arizona features 

15 Scottish isle 
Ifl Lemon's 

partner 

17 With 36- Across 
and 55 - Act oss. 
a sales pitch 
disclaimer 
20 Baden-Baden 
end others 


21 Shea team 

22 Eastern V.I.P. 

23 Mr. Caesar 

24 Ship to 

25 “Swan Lake.* 

eg 

29 Tiny bit 
ai Not native 

22 Printer's 
employee 

33 Printer's 


measures 
26 See 17- Across 


3bHis wife look a 
turn for the 
worse 

ao Obsolescent 
piano key 
material 

41 Bellini opera 

42 Hoarder's cry 

43 Teiescopist's 
sighting 

44 Strength 

«7 Opponent 

48 Xerox 
competitor 

49 "When i was 


5 Type of cobra 

6 Shot 

7 Artist's pad? 

8 Son of Seth 

9 Revolutionary. 

e-8 

la 'Remember the 


45 Reason out so Noted James 

46 Sentence Earl Jones 

subjects stage role 

47 Country homes 6* Entice 

48 Pigeon coop 52 The holm oak 

48 da capo saErupterof 1669 


54 Applications 

56 G.l. entertamera 

57 Command to 


.1 


Solution to Puzzle of March 18 
^IgIaTvTeMI 


EIQDSHlj 


Mhxqi 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Mgh 


Tod* 


Ti 

H*l 


Low W 


Totay 
High Low 


W Mgh Low W 


Dwww 
DriK* 
HonoUu 
Houston 
Las Angela 



OF 

C* 


OF 

CIF 


OF 

OF 

OF 

OF 

Baku 

21/70 

12*3 


20*8 

13*5 S 

Buanoa/Uaa 

28/79 

20*8 pe 

31*8 

21/70 m 

Cara 

21/30 

8M3 


22/71 

10*0 a 

Caracas 

29*4 

2303 a 

29*4 

24/75 a 

DnmtKu 

18*1 

4*9 


18*7 

6/43 a 

Lkrw 

28/79 

21/70 PC 

27*0 

21/70 a 


16*1 

7/44 


18*1 

9/41 pc 

UaatoaCty 

a*» 

12*3 pc 28*2 

1162 pc 

Lunr 

26/79 

4/39 


28*2 

9/48 a 

Rtodaianeko 29/84 

23/73 pc 

29*4 

23173 pc 

Bfl** 

2B*2 

17*2 

PC 29*4 

15*9 * 

Sarttosp 

33*1 

15/59 a 

32*9 

12*3 a 


New York 
Pheaa 
San Fran. 


vvsww.Hoe. 


’. e-doudy. ghfitwwers. Hhundwstoms. r-rth. st-eron femes, 

AI irapt, foiecsats otd dUs pcwidMl by Accu-Wewttwr, Inc. e 1QM 


-4« - 12 m 

22/71 SMS 
10/50 10* 
14*7 104 

18*4 307 

1102 -107 
2802 1906 
24/75 1203 
21/70 1203 
30«6 »«J 
1203 2/36 

409 -4/25 
ZinO 22/71 
1203 3/37 

2BM2 16*1 
17/82 8 M6 

11/52 205 

7/44 -3/27 
7801 6 M3 


PC -2/29 

* 20/BO 
PC 9/48 
S 1040 

* 18/84 
Ml 8/4* 

e 27/80 
I 24/75 
( 20/08 
a 2602 
a 7M4 
pc 4/38 

pc 2802 
r 1203 
a 2805 
pc 1203 

* 8/46 
r 5M1 
r 1509 


- 12*11 pc 

9/48 pc 
1/34 ah 
2/35 pc 
1134 pc 
-1/37 pc 
21/70 pc 
17® C 
1102 a 
1908 pc 
104 pc 
-504 rii 
2008 pc 
3/37 *■ 
12/53 s 
7M4 pc 
307 ril 
-3/27 pc 
307 pc 





Si in of 

SS See 17- Across 

58 Person 'twixt f 2 
and 20 

59 'The King and I* 
setting 

60 Singer Cara 

61 Misses the mark 

62 Paddies 

63 Waco locale 


DOWN 


UQHQQ aaaauLi 


1 Concert hall 
equipment 

2 Harvest 

3 Greek mountain 

4 Wrestlers ' needs 


11 Heartbroken 
swain 

l 2 Leno. for one 
is Bucks and does 
16 Give forth 
18 Indian 
noblewoman 

23 Feeling 

24 Suffix with tip or 
dump 

as Get-out-of-fail 
money 
2 e In addition 

27 Bit of fluff 

28 Mr. Durocher 

29 Harden 

30 “Sure, why not?" 

32 Borodin's 

‘Prince * 

33 To be. in Parse 

34 Secretarial work 

35 Bum 

37 Confess 
36“ on your 

life!" 

43 Fashion 
«4 “60 Minutes" 
reqular 



s 

i i 


Puxria By Sidney L Rubnm 


<5 New York rimes Edited by Will Short z. 


Iravel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


ABff Access Numbers 
Hem' to call around the world. 

I. Using the chan hefcw, find the country you an? calling frwn. 

— Dkal die corresponding AUff Access Number. 

3. An XIKT English-speaking Operator or voice prompt will ask for the phone number you wishioal! 
awoincT struct represeraauve. ■ io 


or connect you to a 


Tora^r your fiwwaBct card of ADET^ Access Numbas. Ms dial the access number of 

the country you’re 31 and ask for Customer Service 


COW1HV ACCESS NUMBER 

ASWFAQRL gjMj 1 - 800 - 550-000 cdESZ “ rr r I T— 

0014-861-011 


Irrfan d 

Maly* 


I-800-SSQ400 



j Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home. And 

reach the US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn't speak your 
language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at 3 a.m. knowing they'll get the message in 
your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with XT59T 1 

To use these services, dial the AT&T Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need. With these Access Numbers and your ABET Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don t have an AESET Calling Card or you’d like more information on AES£T global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right. 


CMnajntGo* 

* 10811 

Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

Grant 

O1S072 

Lithuania* 

8*196 

Hong Song 

800-1111 

Luxembourg 

0-800-0111 

India* 

000-117 

Maks* 

0800-890-110 

Indonesia*' 

001^01-10 

Monaco* 

19*-00ll 

Japan* 

0039-1 1J 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

Korea 

009-U 

Norway- 

800-190-11 

Korea** 

It* 

Poland**** 

0*010-480-0111 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Foitqgal' 

05017-1-288 

New Zealand 

000-911 

Xnrwnljj 

01-8004288 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Rnssta-CMoscow) 

155-5042 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

00-420-00101 

Singapore 

80001) 1-ill 

Spain 

90099-00-11 

Sri Lanka 

430-930 

Sivcdcn* 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080-10288-0 

Swifauland* 

1554)0-1 1 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

UJL 

0500«9«0ii 


COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

Colombia 

980-11-0010 

Costa Rica** 

114 

Ecuador* 

119 

H Salvador* 

190 

Guatemala* 

190 

Guyana*** 

165 

Honduras's 

125 

Mexico*** 

95-800462-4240 

WeatwgnaQfana|p»> vr* 

Panamas 

109 

Peru* 

191 

Surinam# 

156 

Uruguay 

004410 

Venezuela** 

80411-120 



Ba hama s 

Bermuda' 


CARIBBEAN 


1 - 800 - 672-2881 



AT&T 


Armenia** 


8*14111 Bahrain 


Austria— 


Belgium* 


022-9034)11 Cyprus* 


8004)01 


078-11-0010 


JWWOOIO, 


British VI 
Cayman Islands 


1-800-872-2881 


1-800-372-2881 


Bulgaria 


Croatia** 
Czech Hep 


00 - 1800-0010 


Denmark* 


9*300011 
0042000101 


Kuwait 

L ebanon (Beirut) 


177-100-2727 
800-288 


Grenad a* 
Haiti* 


1-300372-2881 


1-800372-2881 


Finland* 


80010010 

9800-100-10 


Saudi Arabia 


Tnrioey* 


426301 

1-800-100 


Jamaica?* 
Ncth. Antil 


001-800972-2883 


0-800372-2881 


00800-12277 


■Sc Bto/Nevis 


001-800372-2881 

1-600372-2881 


Germany 


l9*-0Qll 

01303010 


Argentina* 


Greece* 


Belize* 


AMERICAS 

ooi-aoo-zoo-nil 


AFRICA 

SBKjjggjg) 


Hnnffuy* 

Irdand*a 


0P-0P0-13U Bolivia* 


0QA-800-0n.il BnBtt 


555 

0300-1111 


Gabon* 
G «oblr 


3100200 


OOa-OOI 


999-001 rfcih- 


0008010 


Ke nya * 

Liberia 


00111 


0800-10 


,Jn * OOa- 0312 - Malawi— 

■ ABO O UmgC«a!n« tra A u/inov-s AUT World Conancr- M*kc -Mjy u Pc Jtalrid* i nan 

^ ^ ^ am [giaour -Cafcnunuipua:, 

I* "Hiwmton to iiw HOfcnoact — Pul*, 

r-T^L C fr" 111 JJItl 11 ’ d* c/umno frl l»*l jtxre • nf tm ^ 1TOfnttf,n * 1 ri' u ^allAiral. 


19M9T 


101-1992 


© 1994 AIBET 


wn in jnU6«01»rtui»xnclnh 

~Pu^- ■ < '»<" AAAWtacJtaatanjpuhU. niB~, „ jmdibaiifal 


;> -:s.